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In Poland "Phoney war" is treated as betrayal by UK and France, who only declared war against Germany and did not perform any other actions. This combined with Soviet attack on 17th September is said to be one of main reasons of lost of the war.

I have read this question and associated answers, I don't want to ask why western Allies did not invade Germany to support Poland, it is clearly explained in choster's answer.

However, in my opinion, it is not 100% fair to say UK did not do anything. The Royal Navy began fightings at the very beginning and one can believe it was everything they could do. Sources say France launched Saar Offensive and "Britain and France also began a naval blockade of Germany on 3 September which aimed to damage the country's economy and war effort." (source). However, I can't find what this blockade look on the French side. All I can imagine was (like in WW1) that UK was responsible for North Atlantic (including North Sea) while France -- for Mediterranean (which has little sense as Italy was neutral then and there was no other enemy country like Austria-Hungary or Turkey during WW1).

What major or even minor actions did France performed during late 1939?

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@DVK: I know, but I only have enough rep here to make a suggested edit, and as I recall it would have to be at least 6 characters. I thought it would be easier for the OP to make the edit. –  Keith Thompson Nov 22 '13 at 21:41

1 Answer 1

It was mainly a "Phoney War." But early in September, the French advanced a few miles into the industrialized Saar region (as they did in 1923). They stopped as soon as they encountered their first real resistance in the form of German soldiers protected by mine fields, even though the 40 available French divisions outnumbered the German defenders by about 2 to 1.

A few days later, the French high command decided to withdraw, and fight a World War I-style defensive war. This decision was buttressed by the rapid fall of Poland, and the fact that it would have been too late for the French army to make its weight felt before the Germans were returned from the Polish front.

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