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The French flag, the Tricolour, was installed as France's national flag shortly after the Revolution in 1790. Its colors are Red and Blue - which are the colors of the flag of Paris - and White - which was the colors of the Bourbon rulers.

I understand that Blue and Red were taken for the national flag since these colors, being a symbol of Paris, had been used by the citizens during the storm of the Bastille. However, why was White added afterwards? All three colors do not seem to have a particularly revolutionary meaning, and wasn't especially White a symbol of the Ancien Régime the Revolution seeked to abolish?

Was there any discussion among the Revolutionists concerning the flag at all? Were there any other proposals for the national colors? Why was the color combination as it is today chosen in the end?

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As for the symbolism of the white color, Wikipedia has a couple of explanations :

White had long featured prominently on French flags and is described as the "ancient French colour" by Lafayette. White was added to the "revolutionary" colors of the militia cockade to "nationalise" the design, thus creating the tricolour cockade.

And also

The colours of the French flag may also represent the three main estates of the Ancien Régime (the clergy: white, the nobility: red and the bourgeoisie: blue).

If you understand French, the article about the Drapeau de la France has a much more thourough explanation about how the tricolour prevailed.

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I understand that Blue and Red were taken for the national flag since these colors, being a symbol of Paris, had been used by the citizens during the storm of the Bastille

In fact, this is likely to be a misunderstanding. As explained in the research of Michel Pastoureau, blue and red where not strongly associated with the colors of Paris at the onset of the French Revolution. The most likely explanation is that red and blue come from the colors of the uniforms of the Garde Nationale, that these colors were chosen by Lafayette, its first commanding officer, and that Lafayette chose them because he associated them with the American flag, then strongly associated (especially in his mind) with the idea of liberty. In turn, these colors show up on the American flag because they are on the Great Britain flag, where the red is the red cross of Saint George and the blue is the saltire of Saint Andrews, the respective Saint Patrons of England and Scotland.

So quite ironically, it seems that the French Flag owes its colors to Great Britain, France's traditional most bitter enemy.

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