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In any part of present Europe, let's say before the fall of Constantinople (1453 AD). Also if you can show me a drawing or a picture (if these buildings are still there), I would appreciate it.

Also, I would like to know what the average number of floors of such buildings in major cities is (Bruges, London, Paris, Prague).

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Out of wood in middle ages Japan and China had impressively huge and tall buildings, sadly I have no valuable data on Europe. –  CsBalazsHungary May 12 at 8:45
    
This doesn't fit into your time frame, but the largest timber-framed religious buildings in Europe might be of interest -- they are the Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica, built in the 17th century: whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&id_site=1054 –  litlnemo May 12 at 9:02
    
@litlnemo beautiful church, deserves to be visited. Where I grew, there is a timbered church too, but not so big as far I know. –  bob - Zombeavers breeder May 12 at 20:05
    
Also doesn't fit the time-frame, but the tallest non-modern timber building in the world is currently Kizhi Pogost, at 37.5 meters. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kizhi_Pogost –  Comintern May 13 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

Timber framed buildings cannot go above three floors (about 50 feet) because beyond that they cannot hold up their own weight. Often buildings would be constructed with the first or second floor made of masonry and then wooden floors above. The "average" number of floors in the middle of a city during the Renaissance would be two. Here is Dürer's "St. Anthony in the City" (1513) showing the typical Renaissance/Tudor view of a metropolis.

St. Anthony in the City (1513)

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50 feet = 15 meters right ? that means each floor is around 5 meters? sound really big... even if I consider the roof as a fourth floor, it's still sound big for me... –  bob - Zombeavers breeder May 12 at 20:32

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