Take the 2-minute tour ×
History Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for historians and history buffs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In WW II, Jews were either killed or driven out from Germany (and all the area it conquered). What followed was the mass exodus of Jewish scientists to the US, which helped the US build the atomic bomb. Meanwhile, in Germany, German scientists were also racing against the US to build the atomic bomb, but they didn't manage to finish it before the US did.

My question is: If Adolf Hitler had been nicer to the Jews and made full use of Jewish scientists, would he have won WW II? I think that this could have been very possible because the US would not have had the atomic bomb but Germany would. This would have determined the war outcome decisively.

Am I right?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Tea Drinker, jwenting, Yannis Rizos, litlnemo, DVK May 24 at 17:13

  • This question does not appear to be about history within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I afraid this is not really a historical question, because the answer is some alternative history related. The 2nd world war was depending on many minor and major decision. Can't really tell on what factor it depended. A lot of "ifs". If Hitler keeps sanity all the war, if he focus on nuclear bomb, if he invade England before USSR, if he focuses more on Africa, if he forces Franco to join into Axis, if he has more u-boats, if he keeps good relationships with jews, etc, etc... –  CsBalazsHungary May 24 at 5:35
1  
questions about alternate history "what if" scenarios are out of scope here. –  jwenting May 24 at 8:45
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about alternate history –  jwenting May 24 at 8:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Germany possibly could win WWII if they were nicer to the civil population and POWs of all ethnicities. As Russian veterans tell, in the beginning of German invasion in the USSR much of Soviet soldiers surrendered to Germany expecting humane treatment. The number of surrendered troops in the first months exceeded million.

This changed very much when the soldiers become aware of how the Germans treat the POWs. Mass surrenders stopped and the soldiers started to fight to the end. It is always attributed by Soviet propaganda to the features of Russian national character or Soviet patriotism, but in fact the motivation behind such fight to the end in large part was due to knowledge of the treatment of POWs. Also they were aware that the surrendering troops were often get killed on site without being taken prisoners.

Similarly, the population initially met Germans loyally and sometimes friendly. But after Germans started to demonstrate their cruelty, mass partizan movements arised.

The cruelty to the Jews also contributed to the process because non-Jewish population drew parallels of how the Germans may treat them in the future. They saw that Germans promised safety to the Jews and then killed them, so to conclude that Germans could not be trusted and not restricted by moral standards.

share|improve this answer
1  
in the beginning, certainly in Ukraine, the Germans were even hailed as liberators by the civilian population which for a decade had lived under Stalins oppression. When the mass killings started (or rather when knowledge of them spread) this of course changed... –  jwenting May 26 at 8:14
    
@jwenting dfinitely this is not true for the whole Ukraine, lol. –  Anixx May 26 at 9:36
2  
The Stalinist oppression and the elimination through famine of the kulaks was all over the Ukraine. A big part of the current problems there can be traced back to Stalin's (and to a degree Kurschev's) "Russification" of the republic, wiping out or displacing entire ethnic and national groups and shipping in Russian settlers by the tens of thousands to replace them. This started before WW2 but didn't end until the mid 1950s. –  jwenting May 26 at 9:42

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.