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I once read that the Romans were masters of building roads that stretched long distance in a straight line like the Fosse Way road in Britain.

I never thought much of it until I watched Canada & The United States: Bizarre Borders Part 2 where the person mentions that the border is about as straight as a pre-GPS civilization could make and as someone who has never attempted to draw a straight line over long a distance I never thought of all of the problems that you would run into.

My question is How did the Romans build straight roads that stretched very long distance?

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No idea on the how, but at some point they realized that their obsession with straight roads was counterproductive. Going straight up and down a hill, or building a bridge over every little river or pond you may find in your way isn't either the smartest thing to do, nor the more cost effective. –  Yannis Rizos Jun 6 '13 at 16:01
    
@YannisRizos Yes, I also read about that. The idea was that you build the road once and use it a million times so having it straight means less travel for the user than having him go around it which they thought would save them resource and time in the long run. –  Caesar Jun 6 '13 at 17:23
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Here is an interesting and well-cited article from Ferris State University College of Technology Surveying Engineering (there's a name that flows from the tongue) covering the technical aspects of ancient Roman surveying techniques.

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Link-only answers are susceptible to link-rot, which renders them useless. Also, some people prefer not to click links to external sites. Please paraphrase/quote the article (or relevant) portions in this answer. As it stands now, this answer in itself does not answer the question at all. –  American Luke Jun 6 '13 at 17:47
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See meta.stackexchange.com/q/92505/192187 for example. The policy has been in place for quite a while. –  American Luke Jun 6 '13 at 18:07
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Yes, but paraphrasing or quoting relevant portions here would solve that. –  American Luke Jun 6 '13 at 18:29
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@Luke Interesting link to MSO that you gave there. The second-highest voted answer there is quite reasonable, in my opinion. In brief, first drop a friendly (!) comment prodding the Answerer to add some content. When you critique and downvote in one fell swoop, it gets people's backs up, especially if yours is the first vote. –  Eugene Seidel Jun 6 '13 at 18:39
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@RISwampYankee (and everyone else): This would be best discussed on Meta. While the general policy is that link only answers are not preferable, there's no reason why we can't establish our own policy on History (although, chances are we'll end up with more or less the same policy). –  Yannis Rizos Jun 7 '13 at 4:35
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