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As Wikipedia clearly shows, there have been many different land reforms in many different times and places. It seems there is enough data for research about the consequences of land reforms.

I am interested in a statistical assessment of the effects of land reforms on the economy. To allow quantitative analysis, I have focused on land reforms in the 20th and 21st century, where quantitative data (or at least estimates) of various economical indices are available.

I am looking for measurements of the effect of land reforms on indices such as: the gross domestic product, the Gini equality index, the inflation rate, and the currency exchange rate relative to neighbouring countries.

Obviously, there are different kinds of land reforms, that may have different effects. For example, land reforms done in formerly-feudal countries, based on democratic ideologies, are different than land reforms done in socialist or communist countries, based on Marxist ideologies. So, the above questions can be asked, for each kind of land reform separately.

Can you point me to research papers on this subject?

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closed as too broad by Samuel Russell, Louis Rhys, Mark C. Wallace, American Luke, Tom Au Jun 28 '13 at 20:57

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Bad subjective: unspoken methodological assumptions. Off-topic: economy. –  Samuel Russell Jun 28 '13 at 6:55
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I think it is hard to answer this way. Just few problems with the question: Land reform made by democracies, communist states, in feudal systems, they both aimed different things, and had different effect. I am not giving -1, because the question itself might be good, but it should be more exact. Please edit! –  CsBalazsHungary Jun 28 '13 at 8:16
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@Kobunite you are right, I probably should have started with specific questions such as the ones you mention. I jumped too fast to statistics, when the raw facts are not clear... –  Erel Segal Halevi Jun 28 '13 at 12:21
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Maybe the question should be narrowed down to land reforms in the 20th-21th century, where more accurate numeric data can be obtained. –  Erel Segal Halevi Jun 28 '13 at 12:28
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Yeah, if you edited your question to ask this instead and provided a couple of examples I think you'd be set. –  Kobunite Jun 28 '13 at 15:55
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