Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

It is a widely used epitaph of the time for beloved wives (see here and here), and seems to refer to Luke 10:38-42: (New International Version (NIV)) At the Home of Martha and Mary 38 As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. 39 She had a sister called Mary, who sat ...


10

That Poland avoided internal wars of religion can indeed be attributed to the religious tolerance of the state at this time, a tolerance that stretches back a long time. And this has to do with it's position where many of it's neighbouring countries were not Catholic. To the east the Kievan Rus adopted Orthodoxy, and further north the areas now known as ...


8

They didn't try because it wasn't politically relevant to them (i.e. The Emperor wasn't interested). Chinese dynasties preferred a tributary network instead of European or Pan-Arabic style colonisation. This reasoning worked well enough considering the key motivation for Europeans traders to sail beyond Europe was to bypass Arabic tariffs on the Silk Road ...


6

Easy: through his mother, who was Ferdinand and Isabella's daughter.


5

Suleiman the Magnificent died a year after the Great Siege and was succeeded by Selim II. The change in leadership also brought a change of focus. Selim decided to move against the equally strategically positioned Mediterranean island of Cyprus. The War of Cyprus started only five years after the Great Siege, and although the Ottomans ultimately prevailed, ...


5

After some reading up I have the beginnings of an answer here, I think. The partition of the Habsburg lands actually took place in 1521 (The pact of Worms) and 1522 (The pact of Brussels), way before Philip II was even born. By the Worms and Brussels agreements, which were actually family documents and not diplomatic instruments, Charles's brother ...


5

Quite simple really, and basic economics: More money circulating in the economy, combined with no comparable increase in things to do with that money, leads to an increase in prices. And as the Spanish government used the bulk of that silver to coin money to pay for their wars, the amount of money in the hands of people in Spain increased dramatically. If ...


4

"Spain was a powerful kingdom ruled by Ferdinand and Isabella (or their descendants) at that time." Charles V was one of those descendants. Specifically, his mother, Juana of Castile was the daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, while he inherited Austria, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Netherlands from his father and the father's parents. And Charles V ...


4

@jwenting is correct. Inflation is defined as an increase in the money supply uncoupled from an increase in the means of production. One crucial distinction is important - you asked about an increase in "resources" - silver is specie/currency, not a simple resource. Adding specie to a market will always cause inflation. @lohoris argues that this is true ...


3

It looks like he did spend those years in Iceland. There are a few pages discussing his time there from 1515 in volume 3 of Historisk arkiv (Gbooks), p403-406 De tre nordiske rigers historie under Hans by Carl Ferdinand Allen (Gbooks) pages 143-144 suggests that he did spend time there (without much detail about his stay). The phrasing of a sentence in ...


3

It's a much more complicated process than saying "Let's do it.", to provision a sea voyage of (at that time) likely 12+ months, return trip. Accurate maps didn't exist at the requisite scale, and pilots "chart's" were patentable; so a European pilot (or three) would have been advised.


3

Poland was indeed involved in the 30 Years War, sending death squads to aid Habsburg allies in Bohemia and getting decked when Bohemia sicced the Ottoman Empire on them. At this time, Poland-Lithuania was far more unified politically under the Magnates and royalty than the Holy Roman Empire... and nobody kid themselves, the 30 Years War was a political as ...


2

Spain was the first to experience a high rate of inflation that swept across Western Europe in the 15th-17th centuries known as the Price Revolution. The inflation rate was about 1-1.5%. The upper estimates are 3.3%. So to answer the question, it seems counterintuitive, because these rates are not high by our standards, but since the inflation rate had been ...


2

Addressing the link you cited, Tokugawa Ieyasu taking no part in fighting is not the same as opposing the war in general. In fact, Ieyasu was the one who proposed the invasion strategy that Hideyoshi adopted. When combat operations began, Tokugawa troops were part of the reserves who stayed in Kyushu. But, as you said, whether or not Ieyasu actually opposed ...


2

To expand on Amandeep Jiddewar's answer: The Wikipedia article on Noryang referenced by OP seems to indicate that the Japanese were not intending a retreat from the Korean Peninsula, but rather a consolidation inside their fortified perimeter around Pusan. As one of the most vulnerable maneuvers that an army can attempt is a withdrawal in the face of the ...


1

I knew nothing about him before reading the Wikipedia article on him five minutes ago, so hopefully someone will come up with a more informed answer. According to Wiki: Hideyoshi's health beginning to falter, but still yearning for some accomplishment to solidify his legacy, he adopted Oda Nobunaga's dream of a Japanese conquest of China and ...


1

In 1485 the House of Wettin split into the Ernestine and Albertine branches, splitting Saxony between them. During the Schmalkaldic War the two branches were headed by John Frederick I and Maurice, respectively Elector of Saxony (Ernestine) and Duke of Saxony (Albertine). The normal distinction between the two sovereignties was made through distinguishing ...


1

The Catholic Encyclopedia (not the most unbiased of sources) states: He appeared before the tribunal of the Inquisition at Toledo in 1582, as interpreter for one of his compatriots who was accused of being a Moor El Greco, by Michael Scholz-Hänsel, goes into rather more detail, saying Between May and December 1582, El Greco served as an ...


1

Here are four maps tracing the de facto control of the Low Countries through the first 30 years of the Eighty Years War: The coloured area in the first map corresponds highly with modern Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. No cities are marked, but Antwerp is located at the south-east corner of the Scheldt delta as drawn. To a first approximation, all ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible