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There were three main periods in the Ottoman Empire. The first was known for internal, but not external stability; the second was known for both external and internal stability; and the last was known for neither. The Ottoman Empire took its form after the capture of Constantinople in 1453, which it took at its capital. For the next two and a half centuries,...


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I can't speak directly for England, but will note that it was much more socially liberal than Austria-Hungary, where the following exchange took place: As recorded in Irving Chernev's "The Bright Side of Chess," a Mr. Epstein, head of the "securities" (stocks and bonds) exchange, was taking chess lessons from Wilhelm Steinitz, then champion of the world. ...


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Of course there's the whole growth of manufacturing in the North as others have stated. Moreover, the farther south you go, the more labor intensive the act of yielding the commodities (rice, indigo, sugar, tobacco) are. The South and the West Indies kept slaves because indentured servants (who were mostly white immigrants from England) were not immune to ...


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Napoleon apparently was quoted as saying after annihilating the Prussians at Austerlitz then taking Berlin "If Frederick the Great had been in charge this never would have happened." Not an expert but Frederick the Great loved everything French and hated almost everything German...which his Army Commanders loved since there would be many dead Germans under ...


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The answer is mainly that the South is where cotton grows , also this and this. Cotton was a very valuable cash crop, contributing about 2/3 of U.S. export value by 1840. It's also labor intensive. Cotton production really took off after short staple cotton became profitable (due to the invention of the cotton gin). The cotton belt is essentially the ...


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Frederick was at least as capable a battlefield commander as Napoleon, who was himself probably only the sixth best French battlefield commander of his generation, after Davout, Desaix, Lannes, Massena, and Soult. Aside: Napoleon never truly mastered the battlefield use of any arm besides artillery, and in battles personally directed by himself over relied ...


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The problem you have with such a journey, at the time, is there is no direct way to travel between the two. From most texts I have read about shipping to Philadelphia entry is only through the Delaware River that makes up the border of New Jersey and Delaware. When reading about Howe's exit from Philadelphia this is prominent as the Colonials were ...



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