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(Hint; I may be of Irish ancestry). (Hint 2: I'm trying to go over the top for humorous value; I mean no offense to anyone but Cromwell and Napoleon, and I'm relatively sure they won't take offense). If your Irish, then the official view is to recognize that Cromwell was a murdering bastard who only fell short of genocide because he was lazy. Later, ...


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It really depends on which “officials” you mean. There is famously a statue of Cromwell outside the main train station in Manchester. It is said that it for this reason that Queen Victoria always refused to visit the principal industrial city of her empire.


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Plutarch, writing about 100 AD, in his "Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans" has a commentary about the Roman Cato the Elder who recommended working slaves hard and selling them off when they became unable to work. He critiques this as being inhumane and immoral, saying that slaves should be cared for after their life of service. So humanizing slavery ...


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Starting in 1776 and continuing through the end (!) of the Civil War, there was a gradual evolution in the institution of slavery in the US. Some of the changes could possibly be described as making slavery more "humane," although that's not necessarily the word I'd use. Slave marriages were not legally recognized, and were initially discouraged. But when ...


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The story behind it is pretty interesting. In 1731 King Frederick the I of Sweden received a living lion as a gift from the Bey of Algiers. The poor lion lived out its days in a cage at Djurgården in Stockholm and when it finally died the hide together with some of its bones were put in storage. Some years later a taxidermist was ordered to stuff the ...


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It seems the key word I should've been looking for is "Christian Slavery". E.g. this NYT article says: Southern Christians believed that the Bible imposed on masters a host of obligations to their slaves. Most fundamentally, masters were to view slaves as fully members of their own households and as fellow brothers and sisters in the Lord. Therefore, as ...


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During the 18th and beginning of 19th centuries the Deys of Algiers made a series of treaties with European seafaring nations. Each of the European states would deliver yearly “gifts” in order to secure free passage of their ships. Otherwise, the corsairs of the North African states would capture whatever they could of ships: seize the cargoes and ships, and ...



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