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16

It's probably because Ganson--one of the handful of Democrats who voted for the 13th Amendment--was on the fence about this Amendment himself. Voting not to reconsider the bill is similar to voting "present" in order to duck a difficult issue. First, Ganson voted against the 13th Amendment the first time the House considered it. He was widely expected to ...


10

They looked in England, but nothing came of it. During the Greek War of Independence, a commission investigated Cornwall, England for descendants of the Palaiologan dynasty. Supposedly, a certain Theodore Palaiologos of Pesaro in Italy died there in 1636. The Ferdinando Palaiologos mentioned in the question was one of his sons, and he died at Barbados on 3 ...


9

Quite possibly for procedural reasons. There are a lot of little nits about parliamentary procedures that encourage weird things like this. For instance, under the older Roberts Rules of Order extant at the time, a motion to reconsider could only be made by someone who voted on the prevailing side in the previous vote. So if there's a chance the vote might ...


9

The White House, which had been occupied for only 14 years at this point, had been richly furnished with sofas, writing tables, commodes, card tables, and beds by Jefferson. The Madisons "inherited" these furnishings, and brought in their own personal possessions. So most of what was burned or looted (like the small medicine cabinet pictured below) was ...


8

No, not even close. Alan T Nolan lists this as one of the components of the Lost Cause Myth in his essay "The Anatomy of the Myth", collected in the book The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History (ed by Gary Gallagher and Nolan). McPherson says in Battle Cry that slavery was more firmly entrenched in 1860 than it had been in 1820. By 1860 the ...


8

Realpolitik: American foreign policy under Washington, Adams, and Jefferson was aimed at threading the needle between England and France, avoiding European entanglements. Getting involved in Haiti would have angered at least one of them. Better to sit back and let the European empires expend their own resources. Also, intervention would have been ...


7

The decline of wagon trains in the United States started in 1869, with the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, and wagon trains as a way of migrating essentially ended in the 1890s. Covered wagons, on the other hand, stuck around for a long time. The covered wagon of the migrations evolved from freight wagons such as the Conestoga, and ...


6

Until 1871, Germany wasn't "Germany." It was a collection of (often) warring German-speaking states like Prussia, Bavaria, etc. Austria, which was occupied elsewhere, never did join. The thing that unified the "Germans" was their common distrust of the French, even though some German states liked France more than others. Essentially, uniting to defeat and ...


4

The decline of wagons was very gradual. They were displaced for long-distance movement of bulk goods starting in the 1820s and 1830s by the canal building frenzy sparked by the success of the Erie Canal. Canals were the cheapest way to ship bulk goods for a long time. By the 1840s, ocean-faring steamboats provided direct competition to wagons for ...


3

Pay huge amounts of money to invade some other country where there were no Americans. Huh? You are applying 2015 morals to 1800 America. In 1804, we did not have thousands of helicopters and ships with millions of tons of fuel just lying around and trillion dollar budgets for invading random countries. In 1804, the United States Navy only had 3 ships (USS ...


2

The electors were likely looking toward the future, anointing Hendricks as future (Vice) Presidential material. Hendricks was a Hoosier of national prominence who could help the Democratic Party make inroads into the North in 1876. Benjamin Brown retired from politics after the election, so there was no need for the electors to defer to him. And anyway, ...


2

It seems very unlikely. Why would Lincoln arrest men who, even if critical of the government, were even more critical of the slave states? My TLDR is that the majority of the arrests were of Southerners or Border Staters who, in some way, materially supported the Confederacy. The pattern of the arrests is entirely inconsistent with arrests for mere political ...


2

I can't really provide example of Polish names in Upper Silesia, but I can provide you with one example and reason for it in Sudetenland before WW2 and one funny story from one village in Northern Moravia People in Sudetenland with the wake of nationalism often changed their names to pick sides. Be it to show more pro-German or pro-Czech sentiment. There is ...


2

I have performed some research and in fact it seems it was not very common, and if it was - being an unintentional result of mistakes or to make life simpler for officers. In comments I've shown an example. One of main characters of All Quiet on the Western Front by E. Remarque (Am Westen nichts neues), being a Polish from Poznań (Posen), named Stanisław ...


2

It'a a (partially) false premise. Cricket was popular with Americans (at least those with high social status) long after the Civil War. While the increasing popularity of baseball did present a formidable challenge to American cricket, the two games existed comfortably side-by-side throughout the 1850s and 60s. It was not uncommon, in fact, for ...


1

I have been doing a study of military service in Hawkins County, TN. That is in East Tennessee, where sentiments were divided about the War. But in that county, a much lower percentage of men served than in the rest of the South. I started with the 1860 census and identified every white male between 14 and 45--these were the men who would have been in the 18 ...


1

"Which Confederate state supplied the most troops" and "fought for the Confederacy" are slightly different questions. Tennessee actually supplied the second largest total of troops--more than North Carolina--from any Confederate state. But more than 30,000 of those fought on the Union side. (And not including 20,000 African-Americans.) An issue which may be ...



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