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The Republican Party remained more responsive than Democrats to issues of civil rights throughout the Great Depression. The Republicans were not forced to choose between their reputation as the "Party of Lincoln" and the "Party of Business" until the 1940s, due to the establishment of agencies like the Fair Employment Practices Committee in 1941. Unlike ...


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To add another answer. Yes, there were plenty of nobles in Europe who could trace their ancestry to various Byzantine emperors. For example, Emperor Francis I of Austria was the heir through the house of Lorraine and the Gonzagas of Mantua of the junior branch of the Palaiologos dynasty who were Margraves of Montferrat descended from a younger son of ...


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Almost nobody thought the Earth was flat by the 19th century. Even as early as Columbus, the argument was not that the Earth was round, but that it was small enough to go to India from Spain (it wasn't). The ancient Greek mathematician Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth with relatively good accuracy i.e. not flat. Columbus used ...


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Male line descent from previous emperors, or any descent from previous emperors, was not legally necessary to become emperor. There were Emperors who seized the throne, and officials who were elected emperor when there was no obvious heir to the throne. Almost every single Emperor after Alexios I Komnenos (reigned 1081-1118) was descended from him either ...


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The thing I find most interesting about this story is not that someone has claimed to have solved the murders, but how many such people have claimed it over the years. The only mention I could find for actual information backing up the initial suspicion was a claim by Assistant Commissioner Robert Anderson (not the lead investigator) that he had been ...


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There is a very good article written in 1999 discussing in detail the pros and cons of Kosminski as a suspect. The article is very long, so I have included a few excerpts from casebook.org: In assessing the status of Kosminski as a suspect we are left with this to judge its strength. Sir Robert Anderson, whose main case seems to rest upon the ...


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The Japanese were a very pro Anglo-Saxon country. This is indicated by their twentieth century track record. In 1902, they concluded a naval treaty with Britain, in 1940, they became part of Germany's Axis, and after World War II, they became America's ally. Beginning with the Meiji Restoration, they tried to imitate the Anglo-Saxon countries, particularly ...


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The Japanese rebellion was caused by heavy taxes and Christians being persecuted. Its not like the taiping rebellion which was a cult organized by someone power hungry. So it probably didn't remind the Japanese of anything since there's such a big difference between what they are seeing in China, which was a deadly civil war, and their own much smaller ...


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The main reason was that North have four times more white men than South (plus, almost 200 African-american soldiers served in northern army). With rate of volunteers about 50% (theoretical figure), northern army would be four times bigger than southern. So it is why South eventually needed 100% conscription, after the first year of war, to get Southern ...


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Initially, Japanese observers thought the Taiping Rebellion was a nationalist revolt by Ming China loyalists. This perception was encouraged by for instance the rebel slogan "Destroy Manchuria, Revive Han China (滅満興漢)". Thus, Japan believed the rebellion to be an attempt by the subjugated Han Chinese natives to free themselves form their Manchurian ...


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An under-appreciated reason for the collapse of the Federalists is that they were, essentially, a neo-mercantalist party. Hamilton and others were pro-industrialization not so much because they wanted to see individuals get rich through manufacturing, but because industrialization made the United States a more powerful nation in the international system ...


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In 1815, Jefferson offered to sell his massive library of over 6,400 books to the U.S. Government to replace those books burned in 1814 by the invading British. The Government paid him over $23,000 for his library. That amounted to almost $400,000 in today's money, i.e., after the Revolution, Washington had to sell a large parcel of his land for $50,000 ...


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According to James David Hart in The Popular Book: A History of America's Literary Taste: Sylvanus Cobb Jr. “was the most consistently read of all the period’s novelists and his Gunmakers of Moscow probably had an American public second only to that of Uncle Tom’s Cabin (99) Cobb's books were action-packed pulp, and he was disdained by the educated ...


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Both parties were pro-business for most of the 19th century. As one example, in 1894 Democratic President Grover Cleveland sent in Federal troops to break up the Pullman Strike. The question, then, is is when did Republicans become the sole beneficiaries of business support? The turning point was 1896, when the Democrats nominated the populist William ...


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Drennon's answer is incorrect. Montalembert's writings had nothing to do with Tyrannicide. John Stuart Mill's reference is to two trials that took place back-to-back in England in 1858. Paraphrasing from the legal accounts: Queen versus Truelove. Indictment found at the Central Criminal Court and removed into the Court of Queen's Bench by certiorari, ...


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From reading the books of Robert Massie, specifically about Catherine II (Catherine the Great) [r. 1762-1796], at this time the lingua franca was French. Anyone who was anyone in Russia spoke French. Catherine the Great and Peter the Great were arguably the most progressive Tsars in Russia's history. With that, a more western style of philosophy, ...



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