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18

It certainly meshes up with my memory of the way things were in the early 70's. But my memory may be exaggerated too. (I was anti-smoking way before it was cool.) It wasn't true that everyone smoked all the time, but it was certainly true that there were no real restrictions on locations smoking was allowed (short of near propane tanks). The first local ...


11

By the 1970s, smoking in the USA was starting to come down from its peak in the early 1960s. (Note that this is slightly deceptive in the early years of the 20th century, when cigarettes were relatively rare but cigars, snuff, chewing tobacco, and pipes were relatively common.) I don't watch Mad Men, so I'm not certain of the characters' ages, but I ...


9

Be careful using movies as research for the commonality of smoking in the early 20th century. Film stars were paid by various elements of the tobacco industry to be seen smoking and paid to smoke in films. Here's a link to a reasonable summary of the scale of this advertising: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7632963.stm


7

Yes, most men smoked For men born in USA between 1900 and 1930, about 80+% of them had been smoking at some point; and during 1920-1950 ~70% of them were current smokers.[1] This matches other countries - at ww1, for example, all soldiers generally received also a tobacco ration with the expectation that most of them will need it. For UK statistics, see ...


5

First of all, I want to remark that people in the first half of 20-s century knew about health risks of smoking. I don't think any new discoveries were made in this area in the second half of the century. Second, all answers above address the situation in the US, so let me add some first hand experience from other countries (I grew up in former Soviet Union ...


3

Two Problems There are really two issues you raise: 1) The contrast in the American voice (I limit myself to diplomatic and political, since the press was arguably equally anti-Japanese and anti-German) of condemnation of Japanese aggression, versus the lack of same against Germany 2) The apparent contrast in severity of provisions against Japan (in case ...


3

I don't know where you got the idea that the US was more "vocal against" Japan than the Axis powers. I picked a random week in 1938 (July 15-21) and looked at all the stories on page 1 of the New York Times. There were 8 negative stories on the Axis and 3 negative stories on Japan. And remember this was a time when Japan was actively attacking China, but ...


2

Unfortunately, I had trouble finding a source of evidence to link to you for this, but I recall that, in a high school US History class, we watched a documentary on the death penalty, and it covered the history of it. There were some hand-painted signs advertising the killing of a known convict, but I can't recall what period they were from. That said, the ...


2

I found the answer on page 267 in: Oshiro, George M. “The End: 1929-1933.” In Nitobe Inazô: Japan’s Bridge Across the Pacific, edited by John F. Howes, 253–78. Boulder: Westview Press, Inc., 1995. “His last major appearance to a wider audience was an address to the Institute of International Affairs at Pasadena. He gave an address entitled, ‘A Japanese ...


2

As other answers have mentioned, there were state and local laws that prohibited alcohol before the Constitutional amendment. And there is the obvious fact that a Constitutional amendment is a more permanent measure than a normal law, which would require a more complex measure to overturn. (There may be a parallel to the moves in recent years to enshrine ...


1

I assume you are talking about the SD "operational situational report" of that date (23 JUL 1941). In English translation, the report begins with a political assessment, concluding "...the Jew remains dangerous and hostile in this area." then goes on to say "A solution of the Jewish question during the war seems impossible in this area because of the ...



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