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The Jewish mob hid behind the front-men of the Italian mob. All the major players such as Bugsy Seigel, Myer Lansky and Lefty Rosenthal were of, course, Jewish. Las Vegas was built by Jewish gangsters, not Italians. Similarly, the new "Russian" mob is actually a Jewish mob hiding behind the facade of being Russian.


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See 'Midnight in Sicily' by Peter Robb for an informative account of mafia/ US 7th Army colloboration.


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Compared to the Great Powers, Italy had two important disadvantages: 1) she started later and 2) she was smaller. No Great Power had both those disadvantages. Italy had about the same land area and population as the United Kingdom. But the UK was the "home" of the Industrial Revolution, and had a "head start" of half, or even three quarters of a century. ...


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Japan had "The East Asia co-prosperity zone" unlike the 3rd Reich which really did believe in all that Aryan Supremo stuff. I've travelled throughout East Asia but not Japan. I'm talking "hippie travel" too not 5 star hotels or Government employ and lived there for 6 months. The History is taught the way it is I think because this was truly an "honest War" ...


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According to "Generations" by William Strauss and Neil Howe, Prohibition was pushed through in the U.S. by an unlikely "out" coalition of social reformers, agrarian interests, and women. (The 18th and 19th Amendments came close together.) They formed a "majority," but it was as "non-mainstream" a majority as one can get. Prohibition barely passed. Prior to ...


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The 1920s were after the (First World) war. Soldiers were coming home from the front. The majority were "bachelors" but quite a few of them had wives. "Society" needed jobs for these returning soldiers. In some cases, a wife worked because her husband had been killed or incapacited in the war. But if her husband were "able" and working, it was considered "...


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The thought processes was that each employed woman was taking that job away from an unemployed man. With unemployment rampant, this was the time leading into the depression in the US, and economic collapse in Germany(not sure where your question is referencing in particular), it seemed more important to lower the overall unemployment rate. You can find ...


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As an American born in the 1950s, I remember a "fear of the bomb" in the early stages of the Cold War. In addition to "fire drills" we (as schoolchildren) had "bomb drills" of hiding in a "basement," or absent such, under our desks. This was perhaps less so immediately after World War II (1945-1950), and escalated during the 1950s after the McCarthy "anti ...


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In the USSR there was none among the common people, maybe except the Cuban crisis period, I don't know. There was totally no fear of war, let alone, a nuclear one. The state propaganda emphasized peace and and international friendship. Regarding the Cuban crisis some people I had talked to said that they realized how dangerous it was only years after, and ...


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Again...as a State of War EXISTED (emphasis mine) between the United States and Japan any declarations of War against or alliance with the United States after this date cannot be considered lightly as the USA was...after December 7th, 1941...under no obligation to declare War on ANYONE (again, emphasis mine.) In "diplomatic terms" that meant KILLING ANYONE ...


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So I think what is most critical in understanding December 7th, 1941 is that Japan itself did NOT declare War on the United States but instead did knowingly launch a "sneak attack" on the US Navy and Army Air Forces on that day. There are those even at the time that the whole thing was a "contrivance" created by the Roosevelt Administration but the fact ...


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To take out Poland, Hitler linked with the country on the other side of it and thus sandwich attacked his target. He declared war on USA because he thought Japan would then attack Russia, enabling him to repeat his previous successful tactic.



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