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LoLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL


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The Dixiecrats and the AIP were not really the same party, because they were led differently. But they had somewhat the same ideologies, geographies and voters. The Dixiecrats were led by Strom Thurmond, an aristocrat. He was pro-business and particularly popular among business owners in the coastal regions the south, and won his native South Carolina, plus ...


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An approximation of the eastern boundary of ethnic Poland was drawn by the Curzon Line put forth by Britain's foreign secretary, George Nathaniel Curzon. Coincidentally, or otherwise, it was actually very similar to the dividing line of the Hitler-Stalin Pact of 1939. Either of these two lines were ones that Polish nationalists could legitimately claim. In ...


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The question implicitly hides a misconception, namely the opinion that to succeed and establish policies, one needs a lot of "support", majorities in opinion polls, majorities in the Parliament, friendship of the media, and similar things. That's not how Otto von Bismarck did things. He used to have some connections to the old feudal order but was gradually ...


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According to Van Manstein and Admiral Raeder who both advised Hitler to attack Great Britain immediately after crushing France in 6 weeks "they were amazed to observe that Hitler thought Great Britain was his Ally." So that ended any attempt at formally invading Great Britain...probably the only time Nazi Germany's staff was in a hurry to attack and Hitler ...


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Under the Meiji Constitution of Imperial Japan, the Prime Minister - like all Ministers of State - were technically appointed by the Emperor solely on his own discretion. In practice, appointments were always made on the recommendations of the genrō, a clique of prominent elder statesmen who had orchestrated the Meiji Revolution. Whenever a vacancy arose, ...


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The Taisho era saw a limited "democratization" of the selection of Prime Minister. For instance, there was the 1918 appointment of Hara Takashi, the first "commoner" Prime Minister, because of the pressures on the nobility caused by the "rice riots." Hara was a "meritocrat" who had served at various levels of the bureaucracy, as well as in the legislature. ...


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Post world war 2 immigration is considered the third of the major migration phases in Australia's post First Fleet in 1788, according to the Melbourne Immigration Museum We focus on four periods: the gold rush days of the 1840s to 1900, Federation to the end of the Second World War, then post-war to the early seventies, and finally 1973 to the ...


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I live in Plzeň and I am located in Plzeň and I assure you that no sensible force has ever considered Plzeň to be a town in the Sudetenland. The Sudetenland has two approximately but not completely equivalent definitions: the mountain ranges along the border of the Czech lands (you may see the nearly circular border of Bohemia from the satellites – which ...


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These three maps clearly outline, in varying level of detail, the portions of Czechoslovakia that were annexed by Nazi Germany in 1938. As the definition of "Sudetenland" has almost no meaning apart from this annexation, they comprise a de facto meaning of the term. As illustrated below, the city of Plzen was just outside the boundaries of Sudetenland as ...


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This question is extremely interesting to me. It's been part of an ancestry research project of mine. My paternal family comes from the Sudetenland, but sadly, with the recent passing of my dad late last year, the last first hand source in my family is also silent. I will try and fill in this answer over time, which might be a bit unusual of an approach. ...



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