Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

43

It is true that bombs in World War II would make a whistling sound as they fell. This could be heard by both the pilot and the target, however due to the Doppler effect, they heard different things. The pilot would hear a high pitched whistle and as the bomb accelerated it lowered in pitch. The target would initially hear a higher pitched whistle than what ...


36

Yes, I can tell you from personal experience that they certainly did whistle. When I was a boy I lived in Nottingham, and until May 1941 we were lucky in that, although we heard (and sometimes saw) German aircraft, they usually passed over on their way to less fortunate cities like Sheffield, Coventry or Birmingham. But on the night of Thursday 8 May 1941, ...


29

The only landing in Europe and Africa that got carrier support was the Torch landing in North Africa in late 1942. In that case, it was not possible to use land-based air support, since there weren't any bases there. All following landings were within land-based air range (deliberately) and relied on it soley. Aircraft carriers were very valuable, being ...


18

Much of the allied airpower used in the invasion was for ground attack and for bombing. The aircraft used for these purposes weren't designed to operate from carriers. Also, the airfields of Southern England were only 25 minutes flying time to Normandy and the allies had so many ground based aircraft, carriers weren't needed.


17

I would date the transition to aircraft carrier domination to the Battle of Midway, in June 1942. The Japanese fought an old style battle in four ship waves. In the first wave as a carrier task force, plus supporting cruisers and battleships, whose main task was to soften up Midway by air bombardment, and then screen the rest of the Japanese fleet. In the ...


17

Here are some rough specs for common planes (as I said in the comment, the endurance depends on various factors). Sopwith Camel (BR) combat endurance (at 1000 m) - 2:30 (hr.:min.) cruise endurance (...) - 5:00 SPAD S.XIII (FR) combat endurance (...) - 1:30-2:00 cruise endurance (...) - 3:00 Albatross D.III (GER) combat endurance (...) - 1:30-2:00 ...


16

Strategically, it didn't make sense to use aircraft carriers in the Atlantic. Any portion of the war that was taking place in the European theater could be reached from air bases already available in that area. The air support for D-Day was pretty considerable as it was. Towards the end of 1942, the US only had two aircraft carriers that were operational. ...


13

The first transatlantic crossing by airship was made by the British R34 in July 1919, from East Fortune, Scotland to Mineola, New York, a journey which took 108 hours and 12 minutes. The R34 had not originally been designed as a passenger carrier, however, so this should not be seen as typical. The return journey to Norwich took 75 hours. Regular passsenger ...


13

In fact, the U.S. did do a lot of work on AA missile systems, chiefly the Nike program. This included the Nike Ajax, Nike Hercules, and Nike Zeus. The latter was expected to counter ICBM launches. The program was scrapped in 1965 when it was determined that Soviet ICBMs would ultimately overwhelm any defenses, and that the only real defense was the MAD ...


13

The Smithsonian lists a couple of competitors including Samuel P. Langley, and Sir Hiram Maxim. Wikipedia has a reference to competing claims. Langley was paid by the government; he may be the individual you're remembering, although I can't immediately find any evidence of the depression.


12

Looks a bit like a Vultee BT-13 Valiant


11

Sea power is not directly about which ship type can beat up which other ship type; it's a matter of being able to run one's merchant ships in an area and preventing the other side from running merchant ships. In WWII, it was difficult for surface ships to protect a convoy from air attack, as we can see from the 1942 attempts to relieve the siege of Malta. ...


10

The allies had air superiority (as quant_dev commented) is the basic explanation. I'll try to add some details. First of all, ground support trained pilots were in short supply. Most pilots stationed in France were trained on bomber interception, not close ground support. Pilots/units with this training were usually stationed on the Eastern Front. Training ...


10

The island of Great Britain, chock full of military airports, was well within aircraft range of the landing beaches. So special ships to carry airplanes would have really been unnecessary. For all intents and purposes, England acted as a giant aircraft carrier.


10

If you blow up the photo and look carefully, the Squadron name is the USAF Bee Liners, which is the name of the 21st Air Lift Squadron. I actually believe this is a Douglas C-54 Skymaster. You can see plane 7233-A in this photo


10

C-54D c\n 10858 type C-54D-15-DC prod line DC589 reg\tail #42-72753 72753 (c/n 10858) to MASDC Aug 4, 1964. C-54 is the type of aircraft (Cargo) D denotes improvements on the base model (C-54A,C-54B,C-54C) -15-DC says that the aircraft was built by Douglas Aircraft Company I believe the Prod line DC 598 is its place on the overall production line. ...


10

Smoking was allowed on the hydrogen filled zeppelin, the Hindenburg, but only in a specially made pressurized smoking room. the smoking room was separated from the rest of the passenger section by a double-door airlock. The smoking room was closely monitored at all times by a member of the zeppelin’s staff, and only one electric lighter was ...


9

Through the course of World War 2; in September 1939 battleships were still considered more important than aircraft carriers, and by VJ Day carriers were considered utterly decisive at sea. This process took a good few steps, however, and really examining it in detail could take an entire book. You also need to consider the application of carrier air power ...


9

Supposedly, the first time aviation was used in a war was during the American Civil War (meaning 1861). Both parties used balloons for reconnaissance, mostly hydrogen-filled. The balloons obviously couldn't be used for any kind of attack - they made a very big target and a single bullet was sufficient to ignite the hydrogen. Edit: It seems that first use of ...


9

I believe it would be Operation Weserübung, the German invasion of Denmark and Norway during the Second World War. German Fallschirmjägers were deployed in several small scale actions in both Denmark and Norway. The first airborne assault occurred at approximately 5 a.m. on 9 April 1940, when a German battalion were dropped on the Danish island of Masnedø, ...


8

It all started with North American P-51 Mustang which had sufficient range to escort US bombers in daytime raids: General James Doolittle told the fighters in early 1944 to stop flying in formation with the bombers and instead attack the Luftwaffe wherever it could be found. The Mustang groups were sent in well before the bombers in a "fighter ...


7

Yes I can tell you from personal experience also I was six years old we lived in Haverton Hill, County Durham, England, there was a lot of heavy industry in that area including Dorman & long steel works, the ICI Imperial chemical industries, Furness ship building company, and Smith's dry dock, for ship repairs plus many smaller companies. They were after ...


7

In Hungary there was an article about this, but I am not sure you are looking for him. I remembered his name, here is wiki, it should be a good point to start. The name is Gustav Weisskopf or Gustave Whitehead depends which language you read.


7

Most bombing by both the RAF and USAAF was partially or fully unescorted. Early in the war, virtually all long-distance bombing raids took place at night to avoid the possibility of interception. The Germans used searchlights and AA guns to try to combat this. Later in the war they developed night fighters. The United States eventually perfected daytime, ...


6

The premise of your question is false. Here's a brief (and incomplete) list of current jet engine manufacturers: MTU Aero Engines (Germany) Jet engines are their main product, usually in conjuction with other manufacturers and/or manufacturing consortiums. They hold 33% of the development share and 30% of the production share of EUROJET Turbo GmbH, 40% of ...


6

I think it's safe to conclude that no fighter plane radios were encrypted, due to requiring extremely bulky equipment at the time. Communication between enemy fighters was theoretically possible, since all you need to do is tune in to the enemy's frequency, but most planes could only use a very limited set of preset frequencies. Of course this does mean ...


6

All of the activities of the airship were considered interesting by the newspapers. The New York Times had 5 or 6 articles on the Hindenburg in April alone. The Hindenburg was by far the fastest way for a passenger to cross the Atlantic at the time, taking only about 70 hours (3 days) compared to regular ships which took about a week, twice as long. It's ...


5

Probably for "Field Carrier Landing Practice". Here is a modern example Of course it's a "probably", I can't find a decent source for this in particular. I imagine they would have stored chocks, arrestor wires in there but I can't find a source. Another image link ,Different Picture


5

Air superiority wasn't really in question for the Allies in mid-1944 over Western Europe and so the extra aircraft that would have been provided weren't necessary. The Allies had thousands of aircraft operating from airfields not far away in southern England - a few hundred more from aircraft carriers wouldn't have been all that helpful. Carrier based ...


5

This is a garbled account of the attack that began the Yom Kippur War, or the October War, between Israel and an alliance of Syria and Egypt. The latter launched an attack on Israel (to recover Egyptian and Syrian territory previously occupied by Israel) on Yom Kippur, the most solemn of Jewish holidays, when the whole country grinds to a halt. Jewish law ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible