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7

Speaking as a former military aviation-type person myself, I can assure you that the U.S. Navy (and uncle sam's airplane army, which was one of the unofficial names of the branch I first served in, the USAF) had and have, STACKS of regulations governing when and where to land if your home carrier is unavailable. I cannot speak of direct or familial ...


1

There were airfields being built starting with Gudalcanal of course. As the War progressed many more Airfields would be created...some of which are even airports today. If you Google search "Navy Seabees" you'll understand an amazing expertise that US servicemen gained by fighting the "island hopping campaign"...one that had a major impact back here in the ...


12

Aircraft losses in carrier battles could be staggering. At Midway the United States lost the Yorktown with a capacity of 90 planes, but they also lost 113 carrier planes. Some of the surviving aircraft from Yorktown landed on Enterprise, refueled and rearmed, and attacked the Japanese again in the afternoon. A slightly different principle applied during ...


12

This happened many times during the period of World War 2, such as in the Battle of Coral Sea and Battle of Midway (Japan versus United States). During the Battle of Coral Sea the aircraft carrier of Japan, IJN Shoho was destroyed while its aircraft still in the air. They didn't have the technology to communicate to locate their main force. So they ditched ...



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