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There's an underlying question of "why would a commander choose to charge through a minefield?" The main purpose of a minefield is not to stop an attack, but to slow it down and restrict the attacker's movement while they carefully pick their way through it. A good minefield is placed in restricted terrain with clear fields of fire from the defenders, ...


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He didn't, and didn't plan to. The minefield at the entrance to Mobile Bay was well-known and clearly marked. Its purpose wasn't to sink attacking ships, but to force them close to the guns of Fort Morgan, where they could easily be sunk by artillery fire. Farragut's initial plan for the battle was for two columns of ships to enter the bay through the ...


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NO and YES - there are two different questions. NO, Confederacy was not down to six states. Western states lost ability to supply eastern states with people and horses, and coordination with Confederate government, but still controlling large territory and fighting, preventing substantial northern forces to be moved to East. If Confederacy government ...


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The Confederates were better at keeping units up to full strength, both by replacements, and by "merging" units. (This was managed at a regimental, not company level.) At the battle of Gettysburg, for instance, there were seven Union Corps versus three Confederate Corps, but the ratio of Union to Confederate troops was 7 to 6, not 7 to 3, because the Union ...


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For our purposes, there are three areas: Northwest West Virginia, Southeast West Virginia, and Southwest Virginia. That is if you divide the state using a "line" running southwest to northeast. This map shows that only "northwest" West Virginia was anti-secession. Southeast West Virginia was pro-secession. Meaning that "West Virginia" was basically "too ...



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