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1

No, they didn't. From their point of view there was now a hostile anti-South majority in Congress. Any attempt by themselves to do things to protect slavery through US Congressional action was doomed to failure. So there was no reason to bother trying. The closest thing they had was allied Copperheads, Northern Democrats who felt the issue wasn't worth ...


1

The answer is: It depends on your point of view. In regards to 'resolving the conflict peacefully' - The Southerners never fully believed initially that the North would go to war for the sake of abolition. The issue of the day was: Did secession require an act of Congress to legalise it? The Constitution never mentions secession at all or even a perpetual ...


0

No, they did not use peaceful or legal means. Often the secession commissions used did not even fully represent the population of the state seceding. Southerners only started worrying about supposed legality after they lost the war and wanted to look better after the fact.


1

Muzzle-loading weapons were apparently frequently loaded with multiple shot. You can read this in the old literature, for example in Robinson Crusoe (17 century), where the procedure is described in detail. Multiple shot scattered increasing the probability of a hit.


0

In 1861, Wendell Phillips used this line, but he was quoting William Seward, not Lincoln.* Seward used this line in his famous "Irrepressible Conflict" (full text here) speech of 1858. Seward was ardently anti-slavery, but also doubted the federal government had the legal power to mandate abolition. He therefore argued that the triumph of free labor over ...


7

#1 happened often. Soldiers were drilled to load, aim and fire in a fixed rhythm to maintain volley fire. In a well-drilled unit, this was muscle memory. If a soldier's musket did not fire, they may not notice with all the other guns going off simultaneously. The order to load would come, and they would dutifully pour more powder in and ram another ball ...


8

According to The Big Book of Gun Trivia, of the 24000 loaded muskets recovered after the Battle of Gettysburg, a quarter were properly loaded, half were double loaded, and the last quarter were multiple (>2) loaded. A further 11000 were unloaded. Research (http://www.policyscience.net/ws/marshall.pdf among others) has shown that combat soldiers in past ...


-1

This apparently refers to a Gettysburg study. The story is that after the battle of Gettysburg, the ordnance department collected all the abandoned rifles from the battlefield and examined them. In some cases rifles were found with multiple loadings, ie, ball, wadding, powder, ball wadding powder, ball wadding power, etc, one after the other in the barrel. ...


0

As of the Compromise of 1850, there were 16 free states and 15 slave states, after California was admitted as a free state. The number of slave and free states had been running "neck and neck" ever since the Missouri Compromise (of 1820), which led to 12 free and 12 slave states, and even before. One problem (for the South) was that the Missouri Compromise ...


3

It was about preventing "free" states from gaining a majority in the Senate. When the United States was formed, slave states outnumbered free states 8 to 5, giving them a majority in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. Over the course of the next twenty or so years, states were admitted or outlawed slavery such that an even balance (9 slave ...


3

The South's deepest fear, from the early drafts of the Constitution, was that a strong central government would outlaw slavery in their states. The entire reason the USA was given a Senate where each state holds equal power was to prevent this. The fear was that if free states ever got a majority in the Senate (to go along with their presumed popular ...


3

Before WWI torpedoes and torpedo boats had a much greater impact on naval tactics than submarines which were still generally considered a bit of a novelty. The Revolutionary War and Civil War examples were essentially weapons of desperation against a vastly superior blockading force and not particularly successful. Torpedo Boats were a different story as a ...


3

Your premise is wrong. The statement, "Based on this question and an answer, it appears that although almost all southern white men of draft age were in the military during the Civil War." is untrue. The relevant "evidence" from the question is: "In my geneology research, I can assume with some certainty that if a white southern family had sons born ...


10

First, according to the 1860 Census, there were 3,526,195 free men, aged 20-39 in the states that would not secede. 3,475,987 of these men were white. Second, according to the National Parks Service, 2,672,341 men enlisted in the Union Army, 2,489,836 of which were white. Around 67.8% of enlisted soliders were between the ages of 20-39. To estimate ...



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