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1

I have been doing a study of military service in Hawkins County, TN. That is in East Tennessee, where sentiments were divided about the War. But in that county, a much lower percentage of men served than in the rest of the South. I started with the 1860 census and identified every white male between 14 and 45--these were the men who would have been in the 18 ...


0

I presume you are talking about the North, during the war itself. The newspapers shut down in those cases were invariably Copperhead newspapers that opposed the war, not slavery. It is true many abolitionists criticized Lincoln, but they were not arrested. For example, according to the "Report and Evidence of the Committee on Arbitrary Arrests in the State ...


2

It seems very unlikely. Why would Lincoln arrest men who, even if critical of the government, were even more critical of the slave states? My TLDR is that the majority of the arrests were of Southerners or Border Staters who, in some way, materially supported the Confederacy. The pattern of the arrests is entirely inconsistent with arrests for mere political ...


8

No, not even close. Alan T Nolan lists this as one of the components of the Lost Cause Myth in his essay "The Anatomy of the Myth", collected in the book The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History (ed by Gary Gallagher and Nolan). McPherson says in Battle Cry that slavery was more firmly entrenched in 1860 than it had been in 1820. By 1860 the ...


2

It'a a (partially) false premise. Cricket was popular with Americans (at least those with high social status) long after the Civil War. While the increasing popularity of baseball did present a formidable challenge to American cricket, the two games existed comfortably side-by-side throughout the 1850s and 60s. It was not uncommon, in fact, for ...


1

The Civil War is largely written about in terms of the importance of the Eastern theater, and Gettysburg as the turning point of the War. However, as far as a battle the south could have won that would have made a major impact on the war, I suggest the much earlier (Feb 1862) fight at Ft. Donelson. The Union victory there compelled the abandonment of ...


0

I think demographics played some part, too. Baseball was very popular in New York, even called at one time "The New York Game." With the large number of soldiers from New York serving in the Federal army, it was widely spread.


1

"Which Confederate state supplied the most troops" and "fought for the Confederacy" are slightly different questions. Tennessee actually supplied the second largest total of troops--more than North Carolina--from any Confederate state. But more than 30,000 of those fought on the Union side. (And not including 20,000 African-Americans.) An issue which may be ...



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