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39

Short Answer: The Candiens were tired of war and content with British rule. Long Answer: Twenty-some years before the American Revolution (1754), which was just before the Seven Years War, this is what the map of British Colonies looked like: Only a few areas of modern-day Canada were British then: Nova-Scotia, Labrador-Newfoundland, and around James' ...


31

John Hancock was the President of Congress. So, as stated, he signed first and largest. In the leftmost block are the signers from Georgia. In the block immediately to the right of that one are the signers from North Carolina. The block below contains the signers from South Carolina. This pattern continues throughout with a few exceptions. Here is a ...


14

After the Stamp Tax in 1765, the 13 colonies set up "committees of correspondence," whereby leading members of one colony commiserated with leading members of other colonies about British (mis) rule. These leaders later formed a "Continental Congress." As a result, the 13 colonies developed a certain common "consciousness." When a few of them (e.g. ...


10

This answer is for a previous version of the question The most persuasive answer to this that I have read recently can be found in "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" by Colin Woodard. It has been a few years since I read it, but if I remember correctly, he posits that different cultural patterns that were ...


10

This information turned out surprisingly easy to find. The Boston Tea Party museum website lists the following facts: 342 chests on three ships 92,000 pounds (roughly 46 tons) reported damage £9,659 equivalent to $1,700,000 in todays money I would be very careful with the total weight stated, particularly because the one chest I could find definitely ...


6

There is an unobvious connection pointed out by Tarle: Before the Seven Years War the major threat for the colonists was the French in Canada who could conceivably mount an invasion and conquer the colonies (who hardly relished the prospect). The only sure protection against that was Britain. Once Britain had vanquished France and removed the ever-present ...


6

There are many examples of propaganda in the American revolution. A few that come to mind off the top of my head: Common Sense, so beloved of grade school teachers and proto-communists everywhere. Letters from a Pennslyvania Farmer Note well the list of several dozen similar propaganda vehicles cited at the bottom of that page The correspondence committees ...


5

The quoted indictment, the 27th against the King of England, refers to the use of slaves and Indians against the colonial rebellion. The most notorious of these policies was the Dunmore Proclamation (1775) which offered freedom and weapons to any slave in Virginia that would fight against rebellious colonists. The Virginians were infuriated by this act. The ...


5

The North American version of the Seven Years' War was the 1[French and Indian War]. And yes, it did set the stage for the American Revolution for at least three reasons: It provided a causus belli. The French and Indian War cost a lot of money, which the British tried to recoup by taxing the "Americans" of the Thirteen Colonies. The result was a battle ...


4

I passed the question to the professional historians at Mt Vernon (Washington's home). The Mt. Vernon research historian provided the following information, which I'll quote. Interesting...I've been on the staff here at Mount Vernon for almost 34 years and have never heard anything about Washington riding sidesaddle. I think what people might be ...


4

It appears that this was almost certainly not the case. Here are some of the things contemporaries said of Washington's horsemanship during the revolution: "the best horseman of his age, and the most graceful figure that could be seen on horseback." - Thomas Jefferson "a very excellent and bold horseman, leaping the highest fences, and going extremely ...


4

In a small way, yes it did. However, the deleterious effects of this incident would have been almost entirely isolated to the southern plantation colonies of Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. Not only are those only four of the 13 colonies, but they happen to have been some of the rebelling colonies in which Royalists (colonists against the revolution ...


3

The Declaration of Independence was explicitly written as propaganda, to convince the World and its leaders that the actions of the American People were reasonable. Consider these excerpts: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are ...


3

The middle of the 18th century was the height of the British nationalist movement. Examples of this movement include composition of Rule, Britiannia! and creation of the popular of cartoon character, John Bull. John Bull is a simple, jolly, content, country gentlemen who represents Britain and is often placed in opposition to France, Scotland or the popular ...


3

A traditional British regiment was divided into 3 battalions. A standard battalion had nominally 800 foot soldiers. A standard regiment, 2400 soldiers. Quoting from "A New and Enlarged Military Dictionary" by Charles James (1802): REGIMENT, (regiment, Fr.) a term applied to any body of troops, which, if cavalry, consists of one or more squadrons, ...


3

It appears that the practice was becoming more common, and was a tactic being pursued and developed by American Revolutionaries. The following passage is from "To Be A Military Sniper" - Gregory Mast, Hans Halberstadt Further paragraphs from To Be A Military Sniper explains a little more about the growing role of Rifles in the American Revolutionary War, ...


3

I found a few articles, here and here. The historical inaccuracies are quite extensive, ranging from anachronisms like tomatoes, to conspiracy theories regarding the knights templar.


3

There is the obvious geo-political gain of weakening their British enemies, who had seen such expansion in that theatre during the seven year war. Come the next war (Napoleonic, yes, unfortunately not so much of a gain for the Bourbons) the United states offered both trade to France and co-belligerency (1812 war). However, I get the feeling France expected ...


2

From Wikipedia – In all the French spent 1.3 billion livres to support the Americans directly, in addition to the money it spent fighting Britain on land and sea outside the U.S. France's status as a great modern power was affirmed by the war, but it was detrimental to the country’s finances. Even though France's European territories were not ...


2

France did make some important gains from the American Revolution, but they were mainly longer term. The first was that she deprived Britain of what later became the United States. Britain lost not only the 13 Colonies, but also "East Louisiana," (the part of the country between the Mississippi River and Appalachians) to the new Republic, and "Florida" ...


2

I'm not sure why you're asking the question; the quotation you provide establishes that he was arrested and prosecuted - ""On July 10, 1805, Butler was found guilty of mutinous conduct." (Quote from your citation of The Writer's Response). "Found guilty" means that he was prosecuted. More information on the trial can be found at The United States Army ...


2

The 17th century English civil wars fostered a spirit of rebellion in the American colonies. Which led to independence. Prior to the Civil War, Parliament tried to impose a check on the king through its taxing powers. Charles I demurred. Parliament fought and won a civil war against the king, and chopped off Charles I's head. The winners, Oliver Cromwell's ...


2

Update: I've edited this answer to expand the material provided and to more precisely address the elements of the question, specifically, what is the factual basis for the accusation? A quick google search for Indian attacks 1605..1776 will reveal multiple attacks. Even if we narrow the range to 1754..1776, there are attacks by Indians on colonists. Trivial ...


2

I doubt the quoted indictment is about the Royal Proclamation of 1763 that forbade settlement beyond the Appalachian Mountains. I think it refers to the current state of affairs months or even weeks just before drafting the Declaration of Independence in June 1776. In March, there were widespread rumors about Sir John Johnson "boasting about calling the ...


1

Having dug out Lineage Book of British Land Forces 1660-1978, Volume 2 (Frederick 1987) from the library, I have discovered that that the nominal strength of a regiment of foot in 1775 was 737 men. Regiments were composed of 10 companies: 8 battalion companies, a grenadier company and a light company. A full strength company would consist of 3 officers ...


1

The generation that undertook the revolution gave lots of specific arguments, many of which could be read in the Declaration of Independence and in Common Sense. Both documents were widely read aloud in public places. They cited lots of arguments about taxes, trade limitations, procedural abuses, unfree trials, and so on. The revolution had broad support, ...


1

Henry Knox's diary of the expedition (pages 16 - 19) mentions a cannon falling through the ice, apparently from inadequate precautions having been taken, and that it was recovered. As no mention is made in the diary of how the recovery was performed, it is possible that no written record remains of the precise technique. Myself, I would start by tying a ...


1

The Americans targeted officers at least once. A sniper at Saratoga, armed with a rifle and lodged in a tree, shot British officers and was instrumental in the American victory. The sniper is reportedly named Timothy Murphy. [added] This is an excerpt from the Wikipedia article: "Morgan called on Murphy and said: "That gallant officer is General ...


1

Wikipedia has the answer to your question "As my wish was to serve an oppressed people, and assist in a just and good cause, I conceived that the honor of it would be promoted by my declining to make even the usual profits of an author." Wikipedia which cites Craig Nelson's book on Thomas Paine. This is confirmed in multiple sites Wired is a bit more ...


1

The general war was actually between Great Britain on one side, and France, Spain, the Netherlands, and the new United States on the other. However, only the French were acting as direct USA allies. (The Spanish, for obvious reasons, weren't real keen on the idea of helping colonies in the Americas revolt). If this sounds complicated, it was, and the treaty ...



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