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1

Bearing in mind the dates already mentioned in the OP, and the fact that the British evacuation of New York City did not occur until November 25, 1783, there was no functioning government of New York during the negotiations, nor had there been since the evacuation of Manhattan by Washington's army on November 16th, 1776. Vermont was a center of fighting ...


2

The preamble of the Preliminary Articles of Peace answers your question. To be inserted in, and to constitute the Treaty of Peace proposed to be concluded, between the Crown of Great Britain, and the said United States; but which Treaty is not to be concluded, untill Terms of a Peace shall be agreed upon, between Great Britain and France; and his ...


-1

"We the Colonists" wanted our own law. The English didn't think us very valuable unlike say India, Egypt or South Africa...let alone equal to the Caribbean and the Spanish possessions. The "United States" did have a vote on its Constitution though. That came after the War of course. Apparently looking at the evidence the British didn't give "the Colonists" ...


4

One reason was that in the late 18th century, Britain was trying to define who was "British." And this, led in turn to the question of what a "colony" was and "how much" representation one should have. There were two kinds of colonies. The first kind was fundamentally empty land (America, Canada, later Australia), settled mostly by people of English ...


11

Attempting to answer the actual question, Giving the colonists seats in Parliament would not have suited the aims of the parliamentarians and therefore it did not happen. In contrast to the acquisition of (most of) Canada from the French (ignoring the presence of the First Nations and their standing governance of course), the Colonies that eventually became ...


33

I think there were two basic issues here: First off, it had never been done before in England. This was effectively the first colony outside of the British Isles peopled almost entirely with Englishmen that had "grown up" to an extent it could possibly consider running its own affairs. There was no real precedent for this situation. When this situation ...


19

Because residents of Great Britain also had "taxation without representation". Britain in the 1700s was not a democracy. Members of Parliament were not members of the general public, and were not elected by the general public. Even when elections happened, they were not in the least fair, and the voting areas had nothing to do with the numbers of voters ...


30

Great Britain considered the colonies represented thru virtual representation and as James Macpherson wrote in 1775 Had the Americans, instead of flying to arms, submitted the same supposed grievance [as the taxed though unrepresented Palatine counties in England had], in a peaceable and dutiful manner, to the Legislature, I can perceive no reason why ...


-1

In 1803, about 25 years after France bankrolled the American Revolution, she received $15 million from the new republic for the purchase of "Louisiana," a territory she nearly lost in the Seven Years' War, and was about to lose again. This was an unforeseeable, but not totally unforeseen result; France hoped to trade with the new "American" nation. Nobles ...



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