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The Spartans are known for different things to different peoples in time. Some of these things are good, and others bad. Today, if you ask a typical 20-something man who has a keen interest in history, watches historical movies and plays historical video games, he will say that the Spartans are best remembered for their Military prowess. It is this quality ...


3

First of all, spartans were dorian greeks who had culture of their own (specific dialect, calendar etc.). And Peloponnesus itself was relatively closed world for many years. Certainly, spartans appreciated poetry, and there are quite a few well-known names, yet little remained of their texts written in 7th century B.C. in laconic dialect. Next, the vast ...


0

I agree with all the answers that were posted on the site before, but we should take into consideration that it is not right to compare the world outlook of ordinary Athenian and ordinary American. The human race took a huge step into future and what was considered normal in Ancient Greece, is considered illegal and immoral in modern-day America(or the US, ...


5

The study of ancient climate is called paleoclimatology. The word "climate," incidentally, comes from the Greek word, klima. There is a difference of opinion about the climate of ancient Greece. For a long time it was the common view that ancient Greece was a temperate, forested paradise with meadows, like modern France or Pennsylvania, a so-called ...


1

Another thing to take into account is that, in the archaic age particularly, armies would often meet on the field of battle and then agree to settle the differences by having one warrior from each side meet. This form of battle would have been more akin to the gladiatorial matches of later periods. Since the Greeks, and even the Romans to some extent, had a ...


4

There are also some hints based on the representation of the Peleset in Egyptian art, with a rather distinctive helmet : which seems to be similar to some helmets found in Crete during the same era : Nothing to link them specifically to the Pelasgians except for the similar name, though.


1

To me this sounds all a bit too contrived. I haven't read the book but there is a contemporary review by Marvin Pope. Pope points out many flaws in Gordon's arguments and concludes by saying that [F]or all the intermingling and syncretism in the Amarna age, it appears likely that Gordon has overstated the case for cultural and linguistic uniformity. ...


4

Mycenaean Greek is an Indo-European language. Hebrew is a Northwestern Semitic language. This by itself makes the notion a non-starter. Gordon makes the case in the book that Minoan and Hebrew have the same roots, and Minoan culture preceded the adoption of Greek in Mycenaea in his speculative Eastern Mediterranean civilization, but this is unfounded in ...


1

Going back that far (to Mycenaean Greeks) seems kind of unnecessary (and tenuous) to me. When Alexander invaded and conquered the Levant it ultimately resulted in a fusion of Greek and Hebrew culture under the Laomedon Satrapy. For example, a synagogue was originally a Macedonian town hall, but this custom became general under the Hebrews. Many other such ...


2

A friend of his named Heracleides wrote a biography, but it was lost so the details of his biography is unknown. But after reading its biography, (in my opinion ) I don't think he had any students. The quote below is from wikipedia Unlike his inventions, the mathematical writings of Archimedes were little known in antiquity. Mathematicians from ...


14

Ancient Mediterranean sailcloth was made of a fine linen, which was written "linon" in Greek and "lintea" in Latin. Many ancient literary sources mention this, for example, Aeschylus, Virgil, Homer, etc. There is a book, "Ships and Seamanship in the Ancient World" (1995) by Lionel Casson that goes into detail about ancient ship technology.


12

He synchronised them to the solar zenith. Eratosthenes knew that on the day of the summer solstice, the sun passed vertically above Syene, which lies very close to the Tropics of Cancer. As the traditional account goes, the sun was directly above a vertical well at Syene, whereas at Alexandria the columns of the Library always leaves a shadow. Either way, ...


6

Simple. While the earth moves around the year, the sun seemingly moves around between the Tropic of Cancer (north) and the Tropic of the Capricorn (south). In the north this is begin of summer and the sun reaches the highest point. The first city where the deep well exists is the city of Syene (now Assuan) which is almost exactly on the Tropic of Cancer, ...


2

The god in question is Dionysus (or Bacchus, if you're from Rome), god of the grape harvest and wine, among other things. The geographical origins of Dionysus are Greek. From the Mycenaean Linear B tablets, we know that a "DI-WO-NI-SO-JO" was known (at least) in Pylos before 1200 B.C. (source) Homer's relative neglect of Dionysus, coupled with the ...



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