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This is all speculation and since Carthage was literally wiped off the map eventually by Rome we can only draw inferences as we don't know what the strategic plans of Carthage were...if any. My educated guess is that Hannibal and his allies and Army had no intention of taking Rome without a follow on attack by a second Carthaginian Army or at least dramatic ...


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There exists genetic evidence of the African genes in the Sicilians' mitochondrial DNA, see e.g. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-1809.1989.tb01784.x/abstract that indicates some percentage of maternal African ancestry.


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The passage means that if you want a fight, you should not meet the enemy on his side of a river which he needs to cross. The reason is fairly obvious. You should wait for him to cross first, and fight on your side of the river with his back to the water. If you win, you will destroy him. Better yet, you should wait until he has crossed the river with half ...


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The only historical connections that I know that exist starting with Ancient Greece and moving forward to the 18 hundreds are through Egypt pushing upriver (South) through the Nile and then through sporadic contact with the Romans (who were the Nubians for example?) After that you have the Portuguese and West Africa but even then I know of little contact ...


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This thesis is manifestly false, and is indicative of the weaknesses of "Guns, germs and steel". For example, the making of iron tools was probably passed up the Nile, to Kush and Meroe, and then across to East Africa; they were making iron tools well before 1000 AD; evidence of iron work by the Nok of Nigeria exists as earlier than 400 BC. Nok culture -...


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The Wikipedia article on Hellenistic Judaism includes references to Greek speaking, Hellenistic Jews: It is therefore no wonder that there were synagogues of the Libertines, Cyrenians, Alexandrians, Cilicians, and Asiatics in the Holy City itself (Acts vi. 9) The reference is to "Hellenism", Jewish Encyclopedia, Quote: from 'Range of Hellenic Influence' ...


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I would call in to question the origin of this phrase. At first glance it seems highly romanticized - something that has been attributed to Attila (perhaps centuries) after his death by judicious use of poetic license. One of the main primary sources for Attila is Priscus - who seems to actually have spent a great deal of time with Attila and is regarded as ...


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Having read all these comments, I am impressed with the amount of knowledge shared on this forum. Very informative, I am also a writer of Sci-fantasy and I found this to be an excellent well of information. But I do have to pose the question that as we talk about materials and their abundance I wonder if as a person dials back the gauge of time, how common ...


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To the best of my knowledge, there are no surviving records outside the Bible that can be linked to the time of Solomon. There are surviving mentions from the records of other nations to King David, and to some of the kings who reigned after Solomon, but not to Solomon. (Not shocking in itself -- lots of people in ancient times are known to us from only one ...


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As a question of law, it is pretty obviously not legal; but if you read the prophets you find it was understood that it was practiced throughout the entire time of the divided kingdoms. If you read carefully, you find a reference during the reign of 1 Kings saying "but the people continued to offer sacrifices in the high places". An again in the proverbs ...


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Yes they did. There are specific instances of historians or philosophers being ostracized for criticizing not even the existence of the gods, but just the powers of the gods. An example illustrating their literal belief is that when Tiberius found out that the god Pan had "died", he had an investigation launched as to the cause of his death. Christians ...


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Your question has a couple of big problems: How do you establish antiquity? Is it merely a matter of geography? If so, just find the countries located near the cradle(s) of civilization and order your list accordingly. How do you account for the political component to government? The nations on your list are all of relatively recent vintage. It would be ...


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Your assumptions are wrong. You assume, that you can say that e.g. modern day Egypt can be traced back to Kemet of 4000-1000 BC. But this is wrong. Political entites do not neccessarily inherit from their predecessors. Sometimes they do, like e.g. Russia from the Soviet Union. But the problem in early ancient civilizations is that there is a whole lot of ...


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When one sees the fell ripened fruits fermenting on the ground or in a bowl or something, it becomes apparent after enough time that there is something about fermenting fruit which distinguishing it from "rotten" food, in that it is not really going bad but going somewhere else. After seeing birds, mammals and other animals delightedly consuming them, it ...


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I would bet that Glohithia is just a misspelled Glochidia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glochidia which are larvae of freshwater mussels. Some of them appear to have a snake-like shape.


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I find no historical reference for this term. I would say made up for the song lyrics. Let me edit my answer a little. I did spend time searching for this term, and found no website, no link to Sumerian, Babylonian, or Demonic mythologies that I tried linking with the term. No image showing it. No Book referencing it. That is what I meant by finding no ...



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