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According to the historical records of the Cornaro / Cornèr family of Venice, they have their ancestral ground from gens Cornelia, via the city of Rimini. Here are links for Wikipedia (Italian version is more informative) and The Art of Living Long from Louis Cornaro, William Temple the family can derive themselves back into Middle ages so Cornaro / Cornèr ...


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No one questions the date of Cyrus' conquest of Babylon: 539 b.c.e., nor his release of the Jews in 537 or 538. Four different Bible writers say the Jews were in captivity 70 years: Jeremiah 25:11; Daniel 9:2; 2 Chronicles 36:21; Zechariah 1:12. 70 years before 537/38 would be 607/608. The 'scholars' who are stuck on 587 or 586 are relying on ...


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The short answer is: loot them. Once the bodies had been looted, they would be left to rot. There is a famous passage in Herodotus concerning the Battle of Pelusium which had occurred about 75 years previously: On the field where this battle was fought I saw a very wonderful thing which the natives pointed out to me. The bones of the slain lie ...


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No mention of Stonehenge or other standing stones is made by Bede, Gildas, Nennius or anyone before them (Agricola, Pliny, Tacitus, Strabo etc). It is likely that in most cases the remains were too remote and too fragmentary to be noticed. In the case of Stonehenge, it is likely it was underground (like its twin Newgrange still is), and was excavated between ...


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The first publication I know of was by Christian Charles Josias, the Baron von Bunsen, in his Aegyptens Stelle in der Weltgeschichte (1845). This was the publication that brought the classification into general use among English-speaking Egyptologists. To quote from Browne's Hierogrammata: The tract of time from Menes downward is divided by M. Bunsen and ...


4

According to this: http://www.bibelwissenschaft.de/wibilex/das-bibellexikon/lexikon/sachwort/anzeigen/details/neues-reich-3/ch/746c4a4853fde241e7777581bf2e29c9/ the designation “Neues Reich” was in use since 1834. This was about 20 years before the birth of Eduard Meyer.


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According to the Oxford Companion to Archaeology, the term New Kingdom was introduced by the German historian Eduard Meyer in his Geschichte des Altertums. English Egyptologists adopted his usage, displacing their earlier designation of the period as the "Empire". Source: Silberman, Neil Asher, and Alexander A. Bauer, eds. The Oxford Companion to ...


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Petra was built at a time when the Alexandrian empire was in operation and the Antigonid Dynasty was in power in that area. The southern part of that empire was nearly waterless desert and occupied by nomadic tribes, some of whom were known as Nabataeans. Apparently they formed an alliance with the Antigonids that allowed them to prosper and benefit by the ...


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The Nabateans had given up the nomadic life long before the construction of the most famous buildings at Petra, such as the Treasury in the 1st century AD. Petra had been the Nabatean capital for around 400 years at this point, and the Nabateans had been Hellenized since 150 BC--they were even ruled by kings with names like Aretas III Philhellene. By the ...


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@T.E.D says, "By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)." No. ...


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The change in number and frequency of the suffect consuls just reflects the changing of the job of consul with the Principate. Under the Republic, beyond ennobling your family, allowing you to run Rome for a year, and getting the year named for you, consulship was the bridge to a plum job administering a province where you could collect money and contacts ...


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It is hard to tell since nobody aside from the Romans wrote...and Roman writers were rich city dwelling snobs who could hardly be bothered going to a distant province and writing down natural features there. There is some indirect evidence in the archaeologic record - Bronze Age settlers would sometimes add to or incorporate Mesolithic survivals into their ...


5

Based on the limited information presented in the question, I would say no. The general model suggests that early Indo-Europeans reached India somewhere after 2,000 BC. There they possibly adopted a proto-Dravidian deity, ana-mandi or male monkey, into their pantheon under the Sanskritised name Hanuman. Given the timeline, claims of the idol being 5,000 ...


3

With a paring knife. That's why nail parings are called, well, nail parings. Also, there were nippers similar to modern yarn cutters which were in common use since Roman times. Yarn cutters look like this:


1

The Greek phalanx often deployed the most elite soldiers on the right flank of the formation. Hanson writes as follows in Hoplites: The Classical Greek Battle Experience(emphasis mine) Each individual hoplite carried his shield on the left arm, protecting not only himself but the soldier to the left. This meant that the men at the extreme right of ...


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Regardless of what the Hindu nationalists vehemently claim, the Aryan Invasion Theory (AIT) has not been disproven. Merely called into question. It is India's version of America's bitter controversy about creation or evolution. In America our big disagreement is: Did we come from Adam and Eve, or from ape-like creatures? In India the issue is: Was it white ...


4

The Romans would accept and raise the highborn of allied tribes, hoping to Romanize their future leaders and cement their political and military relationships. Maroboduus was a ward of Augustus. Later, as king of the Marcomanni, he organized a confederation of tribes to defend against Rome. This was also the case with the Germanic Cherusci tribe, which was ...



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