Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The direct motivation of Nebuchadnezzar in sparing King Jeconiah is not known. However, we can discern his motivation from subsequent events that suggest that keeping an heir of David alive, but under the thumb of the Babylonian king would make it easier to manage the large number of Jews in exile in Babylon. In or about the year 597 BCE, Jeconiah, the ...


0

Chariots, LOL, I want a chariot. Well dude, sorry to disappoint you, but they WALKED as amazing as that may seem. Unless you were a child or old guy with bad legs, in which case you rode an ass. The problem with asses is that they are as slow as molasses and they can get ornery if you overburden them. Like horses they are insanely uncomfortable if you ride ...


3

First off the Greco-Roman world extends over a long time period. Depending on how you measure it that could span a millennium. So the answer to your question changes depending on when you are travelling, (and the season of the year; some seasons you travel by sea, and some you must travel by land) and where you are travelling. Beyond that, the answer ...


0

Macedon was ancient-Greek Kingdom - Alexander the Great was Greek King of Macedon. Macedonians form Northen branch of Dorians - Spartans form Southern branch of Dorians. Nobody disputes Greekness of Sparta or Spartans! The Greekness of ancient-Macedon and the peoples that inhabited the Kingdom is on equilibrium with Spartan example.


3

According to the book of Han, it's 100 plus some (百餘人). The full entry is as follows and pretty much matches the description on Wikipedia: 濟東王彭離立二十九年。彭離驕悍,昏莫私與其奴亡命少年數十人行剽,殺人取財物以為好。所殺發覺者百餘人,國皆知之,莫敢夜行。所殺者子上書告言,有司請誅,武帝弗忍,廢為庶人,徙上庸,國除,為大河郡。 http://ctext.org/han-shu/wen-san-wang-zhuan The translation on Wikipedia is acceptable so I'll reproduce here (with ...


3

If you look at the map, you can see that there are highly mountainous regions covering northeastern India and Southwest China. So even if you draw a boundary line somewhere through these mountains, you can see that the desirability and likelihood of moving or fighting across these mountains is pretty slim (at least until 1962). They acted as a buffer zone ...


14

Because China was actually pretty far from India. For most of the past millennia, China and India were not "neighbouring countries" in any meaningful sense of the word. Most Chinese empires did not actually stretch all the way to the Indian subcontinent. It seems you're considering China and India based on their modern borders, but that is misleading: ...


4

Good Fences Make Good Neighboors The answer consists of 1 word - Himalayas. Okay, let me add the second word: Tibet. Basically, the two cultures have been completely separated by an insurmountable barrier (not to mention that the fact that India and China share a border today is an artifact of the 20th century, when China annexed Tibet).


4

Your guess is correct. Bathing in Rome was one of common daily activities. While nowdays bathing is seen as strictly private activity, bathing in Rome was public activity. Rich Romans could afford themselves bathing facilities in their villas, while other classes bathed in thermaes, public facilities for bathing, similar to nowdays spas. They were owned by ...


5

The oldest Biblical manuscript is Papyrus P52 containing a fragment of the Gospel According to John. It dates to around 100-150 A.D., and is usually cited as from 125 AD. It has been alleged that a fragment of the Gospels According to Mark dates to the first century, but as far as I know this has not been authenticated officially. (Since the question ...


1

Since you have changed your question I will reply directly to the question you have posed. The oldest fragments of manuscripts of parts of the New Testament are not older than the first quarter of the second century.


4

The earliest confirmed date of written evidence for Christianity is probably the book of 1 Thessalonians, which is dated around 50 AD. Wikipedia has a list of the various books of the new testament (the portion of the Christian Bible which is specific to Christianity), and their dates of authorship. The oldest known, existing manuscript from the New ...


2

I think this is a perfectly legitimate question. The first real (that is: datable and tangible) evidence for Christianity is the report of the Roman pagan historian Tacitus about Christians in Rome at the time of Nero. Tacitus wrote his history around the year 116.


3

Prisons, as we understand them today serve the purpose of depriving an individual of their liberty; that idea of liberty did not exist at the time that you refer to. The liberty of an individual to live their life as they see fit within the restraints of the law is a modern concept, therefor the idea of punishing a person by depriving them of something of ...


3

The Han general Ban Chao (AD 32-102) reconquered the states in the Western Regions (the modern day Tarim Basin in Xinjiang) after pushing the Xiongnu out of the region. This included the kingdoms of Kashgar, Loulan, and Khotan, which were returned to Chinese control. He also sent his emissary Gan Ying even further in order to reach Rome (Daqin). Gan Ying ...


9

They did know. Roman knowledge of China is attested in the Geographia, work of the famous Claudius Ptolemy. Which is not to say, however, that the Romans knew much at all about the Han Empire (or vice versa, for that matter). For instance, Ptolemy's map of the Far East coastline is rather distorted: In Chinese records, the Han Emperor first received ...


3

A prison is expensive: you have to build the installation with all the necessary security precautions (fixed costs), and then feed and cloth the inmates and guards (variable costs). This is completely unaffordable for a subsistence society (IOW, before feudal castles provides dungeons). The Biblical law provides for 3 kinds of penalties: death, flogging (at ...


2

The ancient Romans had prisons, such as Mamertime Prison, but imprisonment was just a temporary measure before trial or execution, not a punishment in itself. The English Houses of Correction introduced a more modern system of mass incarceration, with hard labor.


5

A nice timeline appears in Max I. Dimont's survey, Jews, God and History (Simon & Shuster 1962). Rather than using the order that you set out in your questions, I will answer chronologically according to Dimont's timeline. Note that historians disagree as to who and how the ideas of Judaism developed, and there might be some quibbling about the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included