Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

In Ancient China, the primary method of coordinating units were to use flags, drums and gongs. Beating drums were a signal to advance, whereas ringing gongs was an order to retreat. Flags instructed units on the battlefield to move in specific directions. 《吳子‧應變》 凡戰之法,晝以旌旗旛麾為節,夜以金鼓笳笛為節。麾左而左,麾右而右。鼓之則進,金之則止。 (Wuzi, chapter "Reaction") The method of war ...


1

1) Long before Rome fell it had abandoned Republicanism. After Diocletian and the Crisis of the Third Century the Emperors no longer felt any need to consult with the Senate. The Senate's role in government and in the legitimacy of the Empire was symbolic. This is the first flaw in the question - the transition between Republic and Monarchy occured during ...


4

The short answer is that it didn't. Monarchies did not become more common, and Europe in general did not adopt absolutist rule, immediately after the fall of Rome. First, to answer your literal question, monarchies were already common before Rome fell. Imperial Rome was itself a monarchy, even though the imperators were initially careful to maintain the ...


3

Those are a lot of questions! Referenced quotes at the bottom. How could they coordinate such an immense mass of people? Divide up the command. How could they provide the logistics? They brought everything with them and hoped either to resupply from the enemy or not at all (win quickly). These armies had to be separated into smaller armies I ...


-1

Even though the armies were massive, ever more massive were the supply trains which helped solve the problem of supplies. Moreover, there are stories of generals who actually burned the supplies right before the battle, thus motivating their troops to win the battle and take the supplies of the enemy. As for communication, it was undeniably slow- while there ...


7

Generally speaking, Pytheas of Massalia had an apparently undeserved reputation as a "liar of the first magnitude" during antiquity. Much of what we know of this comes from Strabo, who is incidentally Pytheas' most vocal critic. Strabo argues against the authenticity of the Massilian's reports primarily based on the dimensions of Great Britain and the ...


3

Nothing would prevent that; it is common. One term for this is to Lie Doggo and there are some examples referenced in the wiktionary article on the term. I'm not sure how one distinguishes "faking death" from "hiding". Here is another example The eminent neologistician has citation files from Prof. Allen Walker Read including this World War I Aemrican ...


0

Wikipedia gives etymology of the word, search each word separately. Mango originated from the Malayalam via Portuguese (also manga) during spice trade with Kerala in 1498. Rice Originated from Indo-Aryan (as in Sanskrit vrīhí-) and subsequently to Proto-Dravidian *wariñci according to Witzel and others. Orange Originated from the Sanskrit word for "orange ...


0

In general, yes, sort of. First of all there are two main divisions of Russians, the Bolshoi Russky (great Russians) and the little Russians. Then beyond this there were innumerable so-called "Slavic" tribes (Pechenegs, etc etc etc). It is important to realize that the "Slavic" peoples have widely varying ethnicities and it is only language similarities that ...


6

There are two ways to answer this question, the easy way and the hard way. The easy way is to use language as an indication of lineage. Language is probably the foremost component of a culture, so this is a valid and typical approach. The language Russians use ("Russian") is Slavic, while the language the Varangians used was Germanic. Historically it ...


4

I have made mail armor on and off for 15 years now and perform in a local living history group. I also do a bit in plate armor. While it looks simple and such things as making a sheet of mail are rather simple, there is a complexity to patterning that is hard to explain to people with out actually doing it. Proper fitting and shaping makes a world of ...


3

The first use of the term golden section (Der goldenen schnitt) was by the German mathematician Martin Ohm in his book "Pure Elementary Mathematics" (1835). Since Ohm, various authors have theorized about the presence of the ratio between the extreme and mean as defined by Book 2, Proposition 11 of Euclid, notably Jay Hambridge in his book "Dynamic Symmetry: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included