Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

Yes It's a variant of the belt claw technique of arming crossbows. Possible reasons include extended range due to a greater pull and presenting a smaller target profile for opposing crossbowmen. Bear in mind that military techniques varied throughout Chinese history, and that much of current theory is based on conjecture. Here's what we do know: Chinese ...


0

Basically, they petered out and were replaced by new families who in some instances gratuitously grafted old illustrious names to theirs. This process took place a number of times. For example, according to one estimate, by 69 CE only 2% of the senators had republican patrician ancestry. And that was before the large influx of provincials into the ...


0

Yes, they did wear horned helms. The British Museum allegedly has a lot of horned helms and also boar helms (though for some reason they are not displayed). For example, in Beowulf you can read of the hero's helmet: ...wonderfully formed, beset with swine-forms so that it then no blade nor battle-swords to bite were able... Picture of vikings with boar ...


0

Kit, Regia Anglorum are the premier Early Medieval living history society in the United Kingdom. They actively research historical social and military life, and have built permanent settlements in the Norman and Anglo-Saxon style, as well as having Viking ships. See http://www.regia.org/research/history/vikings.htm and ...


2

In Rome at War, Nathan Rosenstein provides a very careful study of mortality rates in the Republican Army from 200-168 B.C. The overall mortality rate strictly attributable to combat is estimated to be 2.6 percent of soldiers per year (125). Overall mortality is estimated at 4.75 to 5.45 percent of soldiers per year, with non-combat mortality amounting to ...


0

Ancient world had bloody history in the East throughout. Casualties were vast and sometimes entire armies were slaughtered. First example which I cite, is the Battle of Kalinga . It is one of the bloodiest battles of history. The casualties and horrors of the war changed Ashoka's heart. That's how we see so much of Buddhism around us. The Battles of Tarain ...


4

(I make a few generalisations here, beware) Economy of scale is a factor in the production of maille, especially in Europe during the early medieval period. During much of the Roman period, iron was mined - mining (espeically deep mining) is an extremely labour intensive activity which can only be supported by a stable and sophisticated economy. The ...


0

It might be informative to look at how people make chain-mail today, e.g. http://metalsmithing.wonderhowto.com/how-to/make-chain-mail-armor-from-start-finish-0118499/ While medieval armorers didn't have the options of working in aluminum or titanium, I doubt that much else has changed. Looks fairly labor-intensive but, as noted above, much of it is ...


16

You will find some cost/price data here: List of Prices in Medieval England Image of the Armour data: Expensive is a relative and subjective term, the best that can be done to answer the question as asked is to compare the prices with typical incomes/pay. For such a we find that a labourer would earn 1-4 pence per day (the lower pay is earlier the higher ...


0

Chain mail is more expensive primarily because it is more labor intensive to make it, and that has always been the case. However, anyone who wanted to use any form of armor had to decide what form of protection they wanted and then decide whether or not the extra expense was justified. Chain mail could tend to be heavier and would concentrate most of the ...


7

Seals were less about verification of identity, and more about verification of non-tampering. As with all significant documents today, the presence (and seals or signatures) of witnesses was the most important aspect of identity- and authentication-verification. Placing the author's/authorizer's seal at the bottom of the written text was more about ...


4

The 4th-5th century A.D. "Bikini Girls" mosaic from the Villa del Casale of Piazza Armerina shows female athletes practicing or competing in athletic competition with dumbbells and a big ball that looks like a medicine ball (both in upper-left). Without knowing the materials used to make that ball, it's hard to tell how heavy it would be. This site goes ...


2

The book is very well regarded: it won a Pulitzer Price for non-fiction and figures in many lists of the more important books of the end of the 20th century. It's impossible to say how accurate it is regarding the truth of its main thesis: that the long-term and gross differences between societies in different continents and environments, come ultimately ...


1

While it is true that alcohol disinfects, it is also a poor hydration source. First beers (e.g. in Egypt) were low alcohol content, even kids could drink it, and they were mayor protein/nutrition source while being more or less germless. You can argue that this is already a hygienic use. Southern and Middle Europe wine was much more available for drinking ...



Top 50 recent answers are included