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Alexander the Great held the title of Archistrategos (Supreme Commander), which was granted to him at the Second Corith Congress. He also was a king of Macedon. He could not bear the toitle of "imperator" which was a Roman title.


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Note that an empire isn't necessarily ruled by an emperor. When historians describe Alexander's conquests as an "empire", it is at least partly in reference to the fact that he subjugated many nations and countries under his central authority. Alexander was definitely an "emperor in the sense that he was a ruler of this polity. Since the word "emperor" ...


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Ab urbe condita, from the foundation of Rome, which is 753 BC.


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Rama was a member of Raghuvamsam or Raghu's dynasty. His clan was called Ikshvaaku. The progenitor was the Sun God or Surya. Suryavamsam is another name. The Puru dyansty is derived from the Moon and so is called Moon's dyansty or Chandravamsam. The other prominent dynasty is Agnivamsam or Agnikula. These were born from a Homa ceremony after Parasurama ...


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(Disclaimer: I've not seen that documentary so I'm sure what exactly it said.) Sort of. In a literal sense, Angkor Wat was built upon a sea of groundwater. The city was built in a very wet and water-rich area; much of this water found its way underground. At the lower levels, the water fills up all the pores and holes in the sandy soil. The water table ...


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(This answer-comment was originally posted as a comment when the post was locked and no open for questions.) The use of Anno Domini ("in the year of our Lord") was first used in narrative history by Bede (although it had been used very slightly in some annals before that). It was invented, more or less, by Dionysus Exiguus (circa 470 – 544). Before Bede's ...


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Prior to the adoption of the Anno Domini system, the main system of naming years was to refer to them as a given regnal year of the local ruler, or of a dominant nearby ruler (eg. the Roman Emperor). Specifically in Roman-dominated areas, the year was named after the two Consuls who took office that year. In a sense, Anno Domini is simply an extension of ...


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The main issue with sustaining a 'line' is that without modern medicine, a decent fraction of marriages will not result in children. This ends that gens right there. If you have children, they may die before reaching the age to marry. In ancient times, child mortality was high, something in the 30-50 percent range. Wealthy families might do a little ...


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Over the centuries the original Latin gens were diluted. Even in late Roman times such names were not common. In many cases Latin families married into the families of leaders of barbarians and their name was lost as a surname. Latin names do tend to persist as first names, however, indicating the continuation of their cultural heritage. For example, the ...


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The wikipedia page on gens notes that Although both the concept of the gens and of the patriciate survived well into imperial times, both gradually lost most of their significance. In the final centuries of the Western Empire, patricius was used primarily as an individual title, rather than a class to which an entire family belonged. The gens ...


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What your teacher teaches you is unfortunately a complete nonsense and political propaganda. There were no "Ukrainians" until the 17 century, and the notion of "proto-Ukrainians" (as people who lived of this territory) is unscientific. This is a good example of the use of history for political propaganda. Very many different peoples lived on the territory ...


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Yes. Off the top of my head, jauhar is reminiscent of the Siege of Masada. Looking at the wikipedia entry for jauhar (which you linked), I see also a reference to Balinese puputan. Finally, here is a list of historical mass suicides, a number of which fit the jauhar pattern (women of a defeated group suiciding to avoid capture or slavery). In some cases, men ...


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Maybe the slaves were marked with red iron. This practice was done against black slaves during the triangular trade, later than ancient Rome. This practice was also done in Egypt against hebrew slaves, sooner than ancient Rome. In any case, I remember so from the film “the Ten Commandments”. In addition, the slaves were wearing… their skin colour. In ...


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Although, as you say, a rich slave might be able to engineer an escape, most slaves were not rich and not educated. Slaves could generally be immediately recognized by their dress. Although there were no laws mandating dress for a slave, they tended to wear clothing which set them apart. For example, no slave could wear the toga, so if a man is wearing a ...


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Well, I suppose it's a matter of means plus motivation. If you're educated - read/speak Greek and Latin etc - then you'd be valuable, and only the psychopathic master would mistreat a valuable peice of property. And you'd need money to get away - some slaves were relatively wealthy, but stealing from your master would be dangerous, the penalties could ...


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First off, I think Semaphore's answer has it right (which is why I upvoted it). Your teacher is almost certainly thinking of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. "Proto-" is a prefix commonly used to talk about the theoretical common ancestors of several seemingly related languages. Thus "Proto-Indo-European" would refer to the ancestors of all Indo-European speakers. ...


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This is not really true because there is no such thing as "proto-Ukrainian people". Both Ukrainians and Russians were invaders who came to their current homelands between 350 AD and 1000 AD. In other words, they were relatively recent immigrants, certainly long after any invasion of India took place. When the Ukrainians originally invaded the area was ...


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Based on what you've told us, your teacher is most likely thinking of the Proto-Indo-European people (Note: I am NOT saying it is accurate to call the PIE people "Proto-Ukrainians"). According to the most mainstream theory, the Kurgan hypothesis, these speakers of the ancient Proto-Indo-European language emerged from the Pontic-Caspian steppes some 6-8,000 ...


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Probably not. Here's a statement by a modern historian: There were no crusaders for universal abolition at this time; while an ancient Christian (or a Stoic) might esteem a slave as a brother, revolutionary efforts to end slavery were never on the table. Source: Christopher J. Fuhrmann, Policing the Roman Empire, p. 27. Conceivably, other ...


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Not all Roman "workers" were slaves, and in fact my (very small) Latin dictionary has three words for "workman" - none of them being "servus". To say that in Latin " a world without slaves " would mean "a world without workers" is simply wrong. There were butchers, fishmongers, fullers, dyers, schoolmasters, doctors, tavern-keepers - all workers, but not ...


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The more I read about the ancient world, the more I come to the conclusion that there was no unified notion of slavery at all. There were multiple things (which the people of the time could distinguish) which we call with the same word, slavery. This is similar to how we call nearly any head of state (and sometimes even not head of state) in ancient world a ...


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As a matter of proselytization (not just in my country but in every country) or actual policy, it doesn't appear that anyone particularly prominent in ancient times did that, no. It has become fashionable to put that belief on ancient Persia's King Cyrus the Great. There's little doubt that his behavior toward conquered peoples was far better than that of ...


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Well, very quickly three ideas came to my mind Spartacus rebelion, it was just one of the three servant wars in Rome. ALthough it is pretty obvious, the slaves theirselves wanted to abolish slavery (at least some of them) The myth of atlantis talks about the automatons, some kind of robots designed by the atlanteans so that there will be no need for slaves ...


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I cannot say with absolute certainty, for much tradition of the Highland Spirit has been wiped from the historical record due to the eventual infiltration and overthrow of the Highlands by the scurge that we now know as the Scottish Rite, but it is my opinion that this method of greeting was used to show a non-Templar affiliation;as it is blatant, obvious, ...


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Short Answer: His army was too small to either assault or securely besiege Rome Rome itself remain defended by two legions and a large, conscriptable population Marching on and laying siege to Rome was beyond his logistical capacity He cannot realistically defeat Rome while her Latin and Italian allies remained loyal The traditional analysis is that ...


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Hannibal's troops were not numerous enough (about 40,000 after the battle) to have a hope of taking Rome, which had a very large population (somewherere around 200,000) and was well fortified (the Servian Wall).



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