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I think some of the answers here are wildly overblown. T.E.D. has the right basic idea, although ironically he only got one vote. If you are "anxious to fight" being on the opposite side of a river is the wrong place to be, because the enemy may take a long time before he crosses it. Also, if the enemy senses that you are eager to fight him, he may delay ...


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Candles where a fairly major fire hazard as it was difficult to shield them yet still get air. The flames were not large, people used to snuff them with their fingers. Also, as Matt Riddly has pointed out, an hour of light in IIRC 1792 took three hours of labor during the day for the average person. Not until the later 1800s, was it common for the middle ...


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Isaiah 20:1 is key in its reference to Sargon. Two hundred years ago, none of the major historians, Herodotus and Xenophon included, had any clue as to who Sargon was. Of course, the higher critics of the period took this and ran with it. Until the year 1843, when the excavation at Khorsabad were started. Sargon's Palace was magnificent and Isaiah mentioning ...


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Respectfully, I doubt that your question can be easily answered. Alas, my reply does not fit into a comment, so here you go. The Jewish tradition is alive in Jewish homes; it keeps evolving as we speak. Grab a Chabad edition of Haggadah Shel Pesach and you will find there many additions and elaborations by various Hassidic authorities over the last 2 ...


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Today I stumbled across Machiavelli's answer to this question (at least with reference to the Persian Empire) in chapter 4 of The Prince, where he writes, Considering the difficulties which men have had to hold to a newly acquired state, some might wonder how, seeing that Alexander the Great became the master of Asia in a few years, and died whilst ...


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You have the wrong idea about Judea. It was not "colonized" by the Romans. There were no Romans in Jerusalem, the location of Jesus' death. Jerusalem did not use the Roman calendar in any way. The Roman praetor who technically ruled Judea was located in Caesarea, almost 60 miles away, a three-day journey. Also, remember that in Judea virtually nobody spoke ...


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This is actually a subject of much debate. More interestingly, the answer depends on which Gospel account you are reading*. For the Synoptics, the Last Supper is the key. They report it as a Passover meal, which by definition puts it on 14 Nisan. The crucifixion is (strongly implied at least) the next day, so 15 Nisan. For John, its Jesus' trial that clues ...



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