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The location and time period of Tel Arad seems most similar to the "high places" that the book of II Kings credits King Josiah of Judah with eliminating in favor of a single temple under royal supervision in Jerusalem. It is not clear whether these places were used for the worship of Y-H-V-H, for idolatry, or for a syncretic mixed practice. Reportedly, ...


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I'm confused about the origin of the Hebrew people. Did they travel from Mesopotamia and then into Canaan? If so, did some of the tribes eventually migrate further into Africa?


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I think it's hard to facilitate an answer as so few primary sources date from that period that we know of and can actually "read" (understand.) So perhaps in the abstract we can infer but I think we'll never know. Our Western "traditions" (of communicating the past on something other than stone) don't really begin until the Greeks...and very few of the ...


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The levant area (Syria, Lebanon, Israel/Palestine) of the time was dominated by an overall cannanite culture. The phoenicians were the coastal branch of the canaanite culture - who lived in individual city-states that made their wealth by ocean trade. The hebrew's core ancestors were likely pastoral tribes related to the arameans, which is even stated in ...


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Most certainly. The famous example is the Delphi Oracle. Everyone who wanted to ask it a question brought a gift. The gifts were held in some place in the temple (apparently open for display). Several times in history it was robbed, and once such a robbery led to a major war. There is plenty of evidence in the ancient literature that other temples were also ...


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According to this reference to Roman temples, from A Concise Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities... As was the case with Greek temples vast stores of treasure sacred public or private were frequently preserved in the temples of the Romans treasuries were usually cellar like cavities the immense mass of concrete which forms bulk of the podium ...


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In his lectures on iTunesU (link), Steven B. Smith reports that Aristotle wrote about many different systems of government that predated the Athenians.


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In the Hebrew square script, the first line of the stele says אנכ.משע.בנ.כמש[מלכ].מלכ.מאב.הד The letters "מלכ" (m-l-k) are indeed repeated twice, but none of these two copies is a part of the true name of the father which is just "Chemosh". The line really says "I am Mesha son of King Chemosh, the king of Moab the Dibonite". The word "King" is probably ...


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There is none (although see below for theories). It may help to recall briefly what the Torah, the five books, also called the Pentateuch, say. In the first book, known as Genesis to the Greeks, which means the Beginning, Abraham is an ordinary citizen who is born in Ur, which is ruled by the Chaldeans. Ur is in Sumeria in Mesopotamia. He then travels a ...


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The usual form of the name in English is Mattan, which is found both in the Bible and in Herodotus where the name is spelled Ματτην. This transliteration is, in my opinion, misleading, but it is very common. In my opinion eta should be tranliterated in most cases into English as "ai", thus it should be Mattain. Unfortunately, many scholars translate both ...


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The main source for confusion is that different sources use different names for that certain person Matgenus (Μάτγηνος) / Mattan. He's said to be the father of Dido who founded Carthage. There are a lot of historians (greek, roman) who wrote about Dido, herself being a quite "popular" person, using different names for her father (Timaeus has "Mutto" (cf. ...


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I'll differ with Anixx here. There's no evidence that democracy was the "most ancient" form of government. Anything about that is pure speculation. The origins of democracy are almost definitely in the council of kings. The Senate of the Roman Republic, for example, started out as a council of elders convened to advise the king. Elites in any situation ...



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