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10

The Premise is a bit off here. During the Crisis of the 3rd Century as well as after, the Roman army usually could win a set-piece battle over barbarians or the Persians. The difference was that the Roman army usually wasn't around where these incursions happened, and the tribes could run amok without much opposition. With the distractions of the Civil ...


8

The first thing to note is that fashions changed rapidly in ancient times, just like they do today and one "Phoenician" might be wearing something completely different than another one. Also, a foreigner who was doing business in Rome normally would dress just like the Romans. Wearing foreign garb in Augustan Rome would not be a recipe for success. Also, ...


3

The modern view of ancient civilization, including that of Greece and Rome, has been heavily censored. Ancient writings on these topics have been systematically expunged or destroyed over the centuries. In general, the ancients were far more promiscuous than society is today. Pederasty was considered somewhat amoral, but was widely practiced. In Rome, ...


2

There is another fundamental problem in projecting back current sexual classification onto Rome. They didn't think of it as homosexuality versus heterosexuality. Rather, they thought of it as being the penetrator or the submissive partner. For a grown man to be penetrated was the shameful act. To be the dominant one, not so much. And since women were ...


2

Even when the Roman children were protected by law, these laws didn't apply to slave children. There was that loophole in roman law concerning slave children. So there was a little if not nothing romans (citizen) could do. Because slaves weren't considered persons,but objects instead. Something similar could happen with greeks, but as you correctly say, ...


2

In the book The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City.' (Da Capo, Cambridge, Mass, 7 September 2010). author Stephen Dando Collins puts forward the theory that the people persecuted by Nero were not Christians, but an Egyptian sect (the priests of Isis). Part of the reasoning is that Christians were few at the time and relatively ...


1

This has been a particularly vexing question. First, it is well established that Constantine "legalized" Christianity in 313 AD. In doing so, it appears that Constantine granted specific rights to Christians regarding property and constructing churches. It's possible these specific rights were conferred by the Senate in the form of recognizing the Church as ...



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