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1

Some Roman gods ramaned the integral part of Medieval mythology and arts. For instance, consider the German legend of Tannhäuser (first attested at 1430), a knight who allegedly met Venus and fell in love with her. There are multiple appearances of other classical gods in medieval epos.


3

Greco-Roman polytheism in Rome survived the 455 CE sacking but it is unclear at what point traditional roman paganism transformed into hybrid Christian heresies versus any retention of religious purity. Secret cults by virtue of being secret are both hard to track and likely to mutate in isolation over time. In so far as Roman beliefs fed back into the ...


-3

We still do worship one last Roman god: Modern Cupid from today... and Cupid from Pompeii 2000 years ago The sole survivor of the Greco-Roman pantheon.


6

The only (to my knowledge) province that Rome brought under its control primarily based on a resource need was Egypt. Egypt, and to a lesser extent, north Africa, were the so-called "granary of Rome". Egypt was a necessary supplier of grains in a time where Rome (the city) and the standing army were growing, and an increasing number of citizens was relying ...


1

As people have said, if Caesar wanted to seize power in Rome, then acting forcibly and quickly was his best option, so what he did was the only sensible way forward towards his goal. The other viable option for rebellion could have been to set up a separatist state, like Sertorius had done twenty years before Caesar's time. However, I think that's an option ...


1

At one point, the Romans extended the frontier in central Germania to swallow up a modest bit of land that was rich in silver mines. IIRC this was around the time of the Emperor Domitian. Sources: The primary source was from The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire by Edward Luttwak. It discusses the annexation and mentions the region as securing some ...


5

@Felix's answer is the key, but there is also the secondary fact that medieval warfare tended to be more highly specialized than the classical. The increased emphasis on heavy cavalry meant a lot more emphasis on a very 'expensive' form of soldiers: ones who needed more training, supplies and support staff than either barbarian tribal levies or big masses of ...


2

Herodotus and other ancient writers claimed the Etruscans were immigrants from Asia minor, possibly from the area of Lydia. It's sometimes asserted that they came west in search of metal: they were famous in antiquity for their metalworking skills and (the theory goes) they came from a much more technoiogically advanced area to exploit the resources of the ...


7

There is some reason to believe that the Lapis Niger includes a contemporary reference to the king, and it dates from thge period associated with the monarchy. It could be argued that the use of 'rex' here is purely religious - just like in Greece the word continued in use for religious purpose long after the political institution was left heind. However ...


6

One theory is that the early kingdom period was actually a period of Etruscan domination which the Roman mythmakers (whose work is reflected in Livy) later reworked as the tale of the Tarquinian dynasty. An interesting discussion of this can be found in the book The Beginnings of Rome: Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars by Tim Cornell. ...


3

According to the Cursus Honorum, Tiberius was not eligible to be Consul until the age of 42. As he was killed at the age of only 30 (163/2 BC to 133 BC) he was a long cry from being eligible for the Consulship, even given the extreme bending of the rules that was becoming commonplace about this time. The Cursus Honorum was a succession of offices to be held ...



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