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15

Short Answer: His army was too small to either assault or securely besiege Rome Rome itself remain defended by two legions and a large, conscriptable population Marching on and laying siege to Rome was beyond his logistical capacity He cannot realistically defeat Rome while her Latin and Italian allies remained loyal The traditional analysis is that ...


1

Hannibal's troops were not numerous enough (about 40,000 after the battle) to have a hope of taking Rome, which had a very large population (somewherere around 200,000) and was well fortified (the Servian Wall).


3

Nero's mother always wanted to get power, note that she was married to emperor Claudius, he already had a son, however, Agripina convinced Claudius to actually allow her son (Nero) to be the emperor. After that Claudius died in obscure circumstances. At that time Nero was really a kid, so Agripina actually had a lot of power, as Nero became an adult, ...


10

It was probably approximately 155cm for women, and about 168cm for men. We have direct evidence for this from analysing the skeletal remains of the Romans. For example, in a study [1] of 927 adult male Roman skeletons between 500 B.C. and A.D. 500, Professor Geoffrey Kron of the University of Victoria found an average of 168cm. This is corroborated by ...


4

The division of Rome by the second triumvirate was into more than the three parts assigned to Octavian, Antony and Lepidus. For example, all of Italy was assigned to the Senate as you can see in the following map: There was no specific results of this tending towards the "fall" of the empire. In fact, the empire grew for another 200 years after this. The ...


2

I want to expand a point raised in @Semaphore's excellent answer. Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People not only mentions Rome - it gives a detailed (if garbled at times) account of Roman history, from the British perspective. Here's the beginning of the list of contents of Book I: (source) BOOK I I. Of the situation of Britain and ...


2

Discovering the opinions of uneducated, non-writing, people in times before opinion polls is inherently difficult, regardless of the topic. The best approach I can see to this question is to look at what the Church was teaching, and assume it was generally believed. For this purpose the cult of St. Alban is interesting. According to the website of the ...


1

This is not a proper answer, but more of an extended comment on other answers. I note the answers and possibly the question tend to not clearly distinguish England from Britain. [This is a common problem with sources in English.] 'Middle ages' is a broad period, so specifically calling out 800AD is helpful. At that time, Britain was populated by Scots, ...


2

The Catholic Church had a presence in Britain from 3rd Century (see St Alban who was a Roman soldier and martyr after whom the city of St Albans was named). The Church continued and grew through the centuries until now, but in medieval times the community life of the country was extremely orientated around the Church's liturgical characters. This link with ...


3

It would be quite difficult to not to know about Roman Empire in medieval Europe just because the events described in New Testament and other religious literature happened in Roman Empire. This includes for instance, the execution of Jesus as well as deeds and life of various saints. The proper question would be how did the medieval population imagine Roman ...


5

To answer the question about Hadrian's Wall directly, Gildas mentions the conquest and loss of Britain to the Romans, including the construction of the wall, in De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae ("On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain"). I am not sure exactly when it was written, but Gildas dies in roughly 570. Gildas was British and spent a great deal of ...


16

The short answer: they were very aware of the Roman empire and its past glory. Long answer: This questions gets to the problem of "What was England Like in the 9th Century?" If you can answer this question well, you can get an idea of whether the average person would known of Rome, or how much they would have known. I would suggest as a starter looking at ...


4

According to History World, the Brits interacted enough with the Holy Roman Empire on the continent to participate in their preservation of classic scrolls. Charlemagne certainly knew of the then-current Byzantine Empire, the Moorish kingdoms, and the history of Rome. The word surely reached the occasional educated British ear. This source does not refer to ...


12

The early medieval Welsh had several folktales and legends which survive in versions written down in the 12th century, but which refer to the Romans. The best known example is probably the Dream Of Emperor Macsen, whose title character is derived from Magnus Maximum, commander of the Roman army in Britain in the late 4th century.


20

Educated people in the European Middle Ages knew Latin and read the Roman classics. They were thus very well informed about the Roman Empire. Even uneducated people were keenly aware of the contents of the Bible (through sermons, passion plays, for example). The Roman Empire figures very prominently in the New Testament narrative (Caesar Augustus, Pontius ...


33

Many writings from this time period mention Roman Britain. Notable examples include the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, both of which mention Rome. These date to around the 9-12th centuries and the 8th century, respectively. There are also pseudohistorical works that speak of Rome, such as the fantastical 9th-century ...


2

Some Roman gods ramaned the integral part of Medieval mythology and arts. For instance, consider the German legend of Tannhäuser (first attested at 1430), a knight who allegedly met Venus and fell in love with her. There are multiple appearances of other classical gods in medieval epos.


7

Greco-Roman polytheism in Rome survived the 455 CE sacking but it is unclear at what point traditional roman paganism transformed into hybrid Christian heresies versus any retention of religious purity. Secret cults by virtue of being secret are both hard to track and likely to mutate in isolation over time. In so far as Roman beliefs fed back into the ...



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