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15

3 reasons that I know of - and the first is visible on your map: Image credit NASA Take a look at the topographical lines around Coats Land - the ascent to the Antarctic Plateau is more difficult from the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf than it is from the Ross Ice Shelf. It doesn't look that bad on the map, but there is roughly a 10,000ft (~3000m) elevation ...


11

Comintern's answer is substantially correct, but hindsight helps us identify a lot of the issues that made the Ross Sea a good idea. From a contemporary perspective, there's one really substantial factor: the Ross Sea area was relatively well understood at the time of the major 'Heroic Age' expeditions in the early twentieth century, while the Weddell was ...


4

General answer: it will probably depend what you define as "the shape". Ultimately, once landfall was made on opposite coasts (1820-1840), and land was proven to be there, it was a matter of looking at all the places a ship had sailed through without hitting anything, concluding that the coastline must be further south than that, and drawing in a dotted line ...


3

A very interesting question, as it turns out. The coast of Antarctica wasn't definitively sighted until about 1820, so no globe until then would have featured it. I found this pocket globe made by Abel Klinger in I believe 18801 that shows the barest outline of some of the coast of Antarctica. Examining some globes from the same manufacturer in 1855, I ...


1

There doesn't seem ot have been any technological advance between Ross's expeditions and later (ant)arctic and antarctic expeditions of the late 19th and early 20th century. The clothing was predominantly wool underclothes for warmth, supplemented with canvas over coats for protection from the wind. This worked surprisingly poorly, in the Antarctic ...



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