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20

It's obviously not due to lack of talent. It's important to ask first whether the ancients even aspired to photorealistic paintings. Consider that the ancients were adept at a form of artistic representation that was even more "realistic" than a photorealistic painting: sculpture. Even the Egyptians, famous for their stylized two-dimensional art, where quite ...


13

I have dealt with this question in my article, "Nudity as a Costume in Classical Art," in American Journal of Archaeology 1989, which can be accessed either through JSTOR or through Academia.com, under my name. I am also editing a multi-author book, Nudity as a Costume in the Ancient Mediterranean, where I take up the subject of Greek nudity again. The ...


13

The first one says USSR (right below the star) The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is a socialist state of workers and peasants See http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/const/36cons01.html (constitution of the USSR), Article 1. The second one says "VKP(b)" in the top-right corner meaning All-Russian Communist Party (bolsheviks) or All-Union ...


13

According to many Hellenistic accounts, photo-realistic painting was well developed and popular at that time. The legend says that an artist made a picture of a boy with some fruits, and it was so realistic that the birds tried to peck the fruits. The artist however considered this a failure, because the birds who did recognize the fruits as real, were not ...


12

Who is the person whose face is painted in the top-right corner? Why does this person is so important that has deserved to be showed on that cover? José Martí, a Cuban national hero. Castro quoted Martí's works both as an inspiration and as justification for the revolution in his 1953 trial and called Martí the "apostle of the revolution". ...


12

The reason there are errors you can't reconcile is that this is not painted from life. This is a lady of 1850. After this the hoop skirts only get bigger. This is a gentleman of 1855, who wears trousers and a frock coat. The people you see here are from decades earlier. The gentlemen wear swallowtail coats with breeches and stockings. The women wear the ...


10

The USSR was created in 1922 so the first one for sure cannot be from 1918. The cited first article of the constitution belongs to the constitution of 1936. The image clearly attributes it to the constitution (by small font below the phrase it says "from the constitution of the Soviet Union" and the entire phrase is in the quotes. So my guess is that the ...


9

It's the same statue, the armour is removable. The statue is today kept at the Museo Nacional Del Prado: The Emperor stands over a nude figure representing Fury, which takes the form of a mature man in chains with an angry and hateful expression. Fury holds a lit torch in his right hand. The group rests on a base covered with arms and military ...


9

On very many statues from antiquity exserted parts are broken, in most cases hands, but noses are also very often. The purely mechanical reasons are evident. There are no reasons to conclude that this statue was defaced. Here is one example of the many: They say this is Cleopatra VII. I do not think anyone hated her so much as to break the nose on her ...


8

It is a bronze lasanum, a very expensive piece of equipment. The way it works is you put charcoal and some oil/wood in it and light it which makes a hot fire (as you can see flames are coming out of it). You then spit meat and put it in the lasanum to roast the meat. This particular lasanum seems to have an arch allowing it to be hung and the man is hanging ...


7

One reason for this is to connect two pieces of artwork. This is a long section, but I'm going to paste in entirety for context. The images are facing pages from a manuscript known as the Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram, or the Golden Book of St. Emmeram. Written for the Carolingian King Charles the Bald about 870, the manuscript contains the four Gospels. ...


7

Since this during a morning levée I assume it's a negligé cap. The purpose of this is to cover the head (which was typically shaved) when you did not have a wig.


7

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has a great page on this exact topic. The key ideas why there is so much male nudity are two-fold: the Greek reverence for athletic competitions, and the athletic male as the pinnacle of those athletic competitions. Because the Greeks felt that sport was such an important part of what was good about humanity, ...


7

This is a picture of King Louis XVIII of France. The coat he is wearing closely resembles that of the Gendarmes de la Maison militaire du Roi during the First Restoration (red cloth, horizontal lace and black velvet on the chest, etc.) As for why the lace and epaulets appear silver rather than the regulation gold, this is perhaps an affectation of the king, ...


6

Found it! The painting is of Perseus freeing Andromeda by Piero di Cosimo painted in 1510 or 1513.


6

After going through every Roman Emperor, I found only six who served over a year and did not have a bust or statue in known existence. Here is the list: Glycerius Anthemius Majorian Julius Nepos Libius Severus Aurelian My basic methodology for finding this list was Open every emperor Wiki page who served over one year and hope Chrome doesn't crash ...


5

The man in the top right corner is Philip II of Macedon. According to legend, Zeus took to the serpent form and seduced and had coitus with his wife Olimpias and fathered Alexander the Great (or Alessandro Magno in Italian). This is why Zeus is shown in the half serpent form. The legend also says that Philip caught a glimpse of this and hence one day would ...


5

Although Euclid is renowned for his compilation of the axioms and theorems of plane geometry, most if not all of this material had been known for centuries. With these mathematical tools, and the use of strings and simple pedometers and protractors, remarkably accurate maps could be drawn by the ancients for territories that were relatively level and ...


5

It is probably a statue of Antinous. (Or Hermes) In fact it is probably this one here (notice the object behind his leg): It is located in the Capitoline musuem in Rome. It is supposed to be Antinous in the shape of the Greek god Hermes. See more here. (There is a debate on whether the statue is in fact a Roman copy of a Greek statue of Hermes)


4

There is yet another reason why the male nude was common in Greece. The Greeks were obsessed with perfect proportions in all of their art, for they saw these proportions as a sign of the divine cosmos. Perhaps the most notable of these monuments is the Parthenon and its Golden Mean ratios, a temple dedicated to Athena which, very clearly links perfect ...


4

This is the best I could find on this type of profane theatre. I found a lot on religious theatre, so I get the impression (rightly or wrongly) that much of the theatre was religious at the time and consequently (I'm assuming) not very erotic. If you start reading from p200 it talks about nudity in Byzantine media. It seems that "nude images were associated ...


4

"Anthropocentrism" is a bit more than portraying humans in art: it's considering humans central to Life and Universe, to the point of believing that Universe was created with humans in mind. From that point of view Medieval times were pretty much anthropocentric, with Earth located in the centre of the Universe that was created by a human-looking God that ...


4

Razie’s answer is somewhat too simplistic. People in the Roman Empire greatly admired artefacts from Greek antiquity. Roman aristocrats filled their villas with Greek vases which were then already 400 years or more old, and treasured them as works of art, not as practical objects. There is a long tradition of collecting ancient works of art in China too.


4

A more likely possibility than General Colbert is King William IV with his (much younger) wife Adelaide. They married in July 1818. Even after his ascension in 1830 William was known to walk around London and Brighton unaccompanied by guards , as here. However the issue of the sash being worn on the wrong shoulder occurs again, and whether he was in the ...


3

Reason 1 The Dark Ages was a period in which all of society revolved around self-contained agriculture, with the land being owned by the three upper classes (the nobility, the clergy, and, so to speak, the "Crown"). It was based upon a very strict hierarchy, with mobility reduced to a minimum. Those at the top could not maintain this de facto state without ...


3

There's really a few questions being asked and it would be better to separate them. Why didn't Europeans in the Middle Ages appreciate "antiquities?" First, because archeology hadn't been invented yet and two because it was the Dark Ages. Now, the Coliseum was scavenged because so much knowledge was lost after the collapse of the Roman Empire, the people ...


3

The museum in the movie is "Galleria d'Arte di Roma", a museum that doesn't actually exist. The figure itself is a rather generic good-looking curly haired figure of renaissance Italy, and is in looks fairly similar to for example Michalengalo's David, although it's clearly not that statue, nor a copy of it. So the answer is most likely: It's not really ...


3

World does not know much about this topic, but we for sure know that Nazi flag was created by Adolf Hitler himself: In 1920, Adolf Hitler decided that the Nazi Party needed its own insignia and flag. For Hitler, the new flag had to be "a symbol of our own struggle" as well as "highly effective as a poster." (Mein Kampf, pg. 495). Nazi Germany flag that was ...


3

Indeed, such pictures are very hard to find (excluding modern movies). I've found this picture (unknown date) showing "Marco Polo presenting pepper to a King" (story here), however I don't know who the king is (Venice was a republic). You may try to contact the blog author to get more information. On this picture Vasco da Gama presents gifts to the king of ...


3

The term "art criticism", as well as the first attempt to formulate what it entails, seems to have been created by English painter Jonathan Richardson in 1719, in his essay on the Whole Art of Criticism as it Relates to Painting and an Argument in Behalf of the Science of a Connoisseur. This seems to coincide with the first large-scale public exhibitions of ...



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