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19

Well there were a few reasons They pretty much had all they needed resource-wise in the country, trade was not a prerogative and even though Zheng He did go out exploring they were not interested in colonies or mercantilism. Mercantilism was pretty much frowned upon within the Confucian system, merchants did not produce goods they moved them around and ...


15

Because China was actually pretty far from India. For most of the past millennia, China and India were not "neighbouring countries" in any meaningful sense of the word. Most Chinese empires did not actually stretch all the way to the Indian subcontinent. It seems you're considering China and India based on their modern borders, but that is misleading: ...


13

This is a good question that must come to many people's minds when they see the two very similarly sized (Taiwan only slightly larger) islands. The similarities are a even more numerous than the visual. They were both long at the margins of power in Chinese empires, had significant minorities who vigorously defended their autonomy (in Hainan it was the ...


11

Another Wikipedia article might hold your answer. News of Japan's surrender didn't reach everyone all at once (as you'd expect), though it is surprising how many Japanese soldiers were still holding out for years. According to that article, the following number of soldiers surrendered or were killed (by decade): 1940s: 85 1950s: 34 1960s: 2 1970s: 4 As ...


11

Your question assumes that some kind of a formal decision was made and that most countries explicitly agree that there is an official demarcation. As this boundary is mostly cartographical, no country has ever, to the best of my knowledge, made an issue out of this location. It's been the practice to just use whatever demarcation that other cartographers ...


10

Kind of, but not as such. The closest to what you're probably thinking of is the nihonjin-machi that began to form in the Pacific around the same time as Europe's Renaissance. These were primarily mercantile communities, but later also housed significant numbers of samurais, Christians and other exiles from Japan. None of them survived after the early modern ...


8

They are tibetan buddhist prayer flags. More info here.


7

The Sri Lankan Civil War was a war where the Sri Lankan government fought the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, who were lead by Velupillai Prabhakaran. Velupillai Prabhakaran was killed on May 19 (or 18 depending on your sources), 2009, the Tigers of Tamil Eelam admitted defeat on May 17th, 2009, and the government declared the Civil War over on May 19th, ...


5

"Europe" can mean different things depending on context. To geologists, there is no such thing as a distinct European land-mass since it is inseparable from Asia (hence Eurasia). Politically, Europe might mean the member states of the EU or the EEC. In sporting terms, Israel and Kazakhstan are in Europe. According to Turkey, country is entirely in Europe, ...


5

Well, written language was, at the time, an economic tool primarily. It was used to record business, political and liturgical transactions, and to cary on a conversation at a distance through correspondance. The things we use it for, instructive texts (such as language instruction courses) and recreational reading, developed much, much later. But! There ...


5

Good Fences Make Good Neighboors The answer consists of 1 word - Himalayas. Okay, let me add the second word: Tibet. Basically, the two cultures have been completely separated by an insurmountable barrier (not to mention that the fact that India and China share a border today is an artifact of the 20th century, when China annexed Tibet).


4

20 Baluch with some tanks had secured the area immediately around the cantonment in the morning. This is the 26th of March during Operation Searchlight, the start of the war. As I suspected, they had tanks and used them from the beginning.


4

Fukuyama's Origins of Political Order examines that question in depth. I don't have a copy handy, but from memory, a strong state is one that can carry out a policy effectively. There are many examples in history of weak states that cannot implement policies due to the interference of domestic or external stakeholders. (also I'm not sure that there is a ...


3

If you look at the map, you can see that there are highly mountainous regions covering northeastern India and Southwest China. So even if you draw a boundary line somewhere through these mountains, you can see that the desirability and likelihood of moving or fighting across these mountains is pretty slim (at least until 1962). They acted as a buffer zone ...


2

In the 1971 Bangladesh war in the eastern theaters pakistan had 1 armored regiment which consist of 75 US made M24 Chaffee tanks. Tanks was used in Dakha during operation searchlite on March 25th. Chittagong also saw some tank actions dring the same operation. During the operation searchlite which started on March 25 to April 10 Pakistani Army used Tanks ...


2

One must consider both the strength of Goguryeo and the weakness of its surrounding states. Strength of Goguryeo Goguryeo had seen severe military setbacks during the reign of Gogugwon at the hands of the Earlier Yan polity and Baekje— Gogugwon was killed in battle by Geungusu, crown prince of the latter. Geungusu failed to follow up on the victory and ...


2

According to Wikipedia, this division was first put forward in the 18th century by Philip Johan von Strahlenberg. It's best if I just quote the passage in full: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasia#History_of_the_Europe_and_Asia_division In ancient times, the Greeks classified Europe (derived from the mythological Phoenician princess Europa) and Asia ...


2

I would like to emphasize the role that the Chinese mindset played. As MichaelF mentioned, the attitude of the rulers dictated the direction of China's advancements. Belief that China was "perfect" and had everything necessary was reinforced by Confucian notions of harmony and society. Signs of political and military weakness that appeared near the end of ...


2

The assumption may not be correct mathematically. This is discussed in vivid detail in the book "The Spoils of Partition: Bengal and India". It was not that the West was predominantly Hindu by a large margin or the east conversely Muslim. But the politicians who wanted to have a more homogenous and therefore more controllable state did their ...


1

The current Wikipedia entry for the Yue-chi depicts them as being mostly friendly trading partners with the Chinese. The (likely Turkish) Xiongnu empire built by the victorious Modu Chanyu (aka: Mete Khan, or "Brave Khan" in Turkish), was anything but. It wouldn't be too surprising to find that histories sourced mostly from the victorious Turks are a bit ...


1

This argument only makes sense if the war in Vietnam drew away money, manpower and attention from the other regional Communist fights - in other words, did volunteer brigades from Singapore and Malaysia and the Phillipines take up the fight for North Vietnam? Did communists in those countries lend significant aid to the NVA or Viet Cong that stalled their ...


1

In Western Part of Bengal Shri Chaitanaya Mahaprabhu started a religious movement in the beginning of starting of Muslim age, which did not much affect the Eastern parts. As a result less number of Hindus in Western part converted to Islam or again converted back to Hinduism. It did not happen in Eastern Bengal where majority of Hindu population had ...


1

There does not have to be an identifiable reason for these things at all. But it is possible that east Bengal was more Muslim than west Bengal because the Mamluk sultanate and the Khilji dynasty both ruled over more easterly parts of Bengal. The Khilji dynasty was also effective in converting people to Islam. Although these dynasties probably didn't create ...



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