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40

Based on what you've told us, your teacher is most likely thinking of the Proto-Indo-European people (Note: I am NOT saying it is accurate to call the PIE people "Proto-Ukrainians"). According to the most mainstream theory, the Kurgan hypothesis, these speakers of the ancient Proto-Indo-European language emerged from the Pontic-Caspian steppes some 6-8,000 ...


12

First off, I think Semaphore's answer has it right (which is why I upvoted it). Your teacher is almost certainly thinking of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. "Proto-" is a prefix commonly used to talk about the theoretical common ancestors of several seemingly related languages. Thus "Proto-Indo-European" would refer to the ancestors of all Indo-European speakers. ...


10

Yes, your suspicion is correct. Once man had boats (no later than 40,000 years ago) and the ability to live in the arctic, the island chains strung across the Bering Straight could not have been a significant barrier. There are native peoples who traverse it regularly today using native methods. As for evidence, archeologically we know about the Thule ...


8

One theory I have read—I believe Jared Diamond—is that Europe's diversity and fragmented nature spurred innovation, while the united China was much easier to control. To explain that: China produced more Iron, better ships etc. than similarly situated European nations in the early 1600s but when the empire's bureaucracy feared the growing power of the ...


8

This is not really true because there is no such thing as "proto-Ukrainian people". Both Ukrainians and Russians were invaders who came to their current homelands between 350 AD and 1000 AD. In other words, they were relatively recent immigrants, certainly long after any invasion of India took place. When the Ukrainians originally invaded the area was ...


7

There is no good answer to this question as posed, because many Asian-American ethnicities are poorer than the U.S. general public. In fact, Asian Americans' high incomes are largely due to Indian Americans, which is not necessarily the group most Americans think of when they hear the term "Asian American." Let's look at a 2012 Pew study of "The Rise of ...


6

I recently read a book, Across Atlantic Ice: The Origin of America's Clovis Culture that purports to challenge the foot traffic in two ways - first that ancient peoples were far more handy on boats than current thought, so a foot path isn't needed for them to spread, and second that evidence for passage from the Bering area is fairly thin in the period where ...


6

What your teacher teaches you is unfortunately a complete nonsense and political propaganda. There were no "Ukrainians" until the 17 century, and the notion of "proto-Ukrainians" (as people who lived of this territory) is unscientific. This is a good example of the use of history for political propaganda. Very many different peoples lived on the territory ...


4

First of all, the name of the Muslim-Turkish state that defeated Byzantine army in the 11th century at Manzikert was Great Seljuk Empire. As its name mentioned, though a relatively short lived one, it was indeed a great empire that extends from Central Asia to Egypt. Their Sultans, most governors and a significant part of their population were Oghuz Turks, ...


3

There were in fact several encounters between Fransiscan friars and Buddhists. Whether it resulted in transfer of "mysticism" can be questioned, but as with all religions, mixing and absorption of ideas is quite likely. Willem van Ruysbroeck, a Flemish Franciscan friar, spent six months in 1254 in Karakorum. In his "Itinirarium" he describes accurately ...


2

First, you can put aside the "Well the Europeans were just cleverer", as even a cursory glance at world history will show inventions and developments from all societies at one time or another, from the Incan to the Chinese. What I think could likely be the main trouble the Chinese had with technology is that the scale of the Chinese nation was so large. In ...


2

No. However, the Han Court did try to make the Hsiung'nu subservient to the Han Emperor through marriage alliances. Nicolae Iorga might have gotten the idea of Modu Chanyu (aka Mete Khan) being a Chinese servant from their wishful thinking. In 200 B.C., Modu invaded the newly established Han China. The first Han Emperor, Liu Bang, personally led a large ...


1

I remember being told that the development of glass making was one of the key technological breakthroughs that enabled the Enlightenment in Europe. Originally used for making vessels and windows, it allowed optics such as telescopes, magnifiers, microscopes, etc to be made. Once these had been invented sciences such as astronomy, chemistry and biology could ...


1

In addition to a huge standing army of war-toughened soldiers with nothing to do, nothing to lose, and eager for adventure (excellent point!), there were also other European countries which might jump on the opportunity. So, for the Chinese (who had a relatively unified and isolated empire), the question was "do we want to do that?". For the Spanish (who ...



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