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8

Premise: I do not have Buxton's book, so my objections are based on other sources. The origin of this claim are to be traced in a series of references. These include: Children of inferior parents, and of the better, when they chance to be deformed, will be put away in some mysterious, unknown place, as they should be. Plato, The Republic, 461 C As ...


7

The Peloponnesian War (431 to 404 BC) was a testing time for the Athenian judicial system, every victory brought forth new heroes and every loss new scapegoats. The Athenians had lost their strongest asset, the leadership of Pericles, when the plague hit the city in the first year of the war, the lack of an experienced successor and the physical and mental ...


6

The third book of Aristotle's Politics is focused on citizenship and its merits, and from early on it provides enlightening information about the benefits of citizenship: [Aristot. Pol. 3.1274b] But a state is a composite thing, in the same sense as any other of the things that are wholes but consist of many parts; it is therefore clear that we must ...


6

This is a complicated issue. One thing seems certain - there was no law against exposure of infants anywhere in Greece, in particular in Athens. (Unlike, say, in the late Roman Empire where such a law was promulgated in 374). It was certainly done occasionally, but whether this was a prevalent or a fringe practice in Athens is a matter of much scholarly ...


5

Michael's answer is a very good one but I'd like to add a couple of details. First, Athenian citizens were not always as enthusiastic about voting as you'd think: voting required a whole day which meant they'd be missing out on one day of revenue from labor. To compensate for this, Athenians were paid (type f3 and search for paid) about as much as the daily ...


5

First of all, less than 20% of Athenians were citizens, so comparing to the total population voter turnout in the USA may actually be higher. Second, because of the smaller size of Attica as compared to USA the decisions the citizens would vote for had direct consequences to each of them. Third, the voting class was also the class with most citizenship ...


4

I am unsure if this is the first mention of Thucydides' 'history of the Peloponnesian war' but this is Thomas Hobbes' first sentence, thirteenth paragraph of the section titled 'On the life and history of Thucydides' from "History of the Peloponnesian War, Thomas Hobbes, Ed." It comes from the 1843 translation of his 1628 version. To this I say, that ...


2

I believe this question puts the cart before the horse. It is not that (aspects of) Athenian democracy somehow motivated its citizens to great political activity; but that the highly motivated political activity of Athenian citizens created and sustained Athens' democracy. A people always get the government they deserve, and the citizens of ancient ...


2

I found this interview with historian Josiah Ober on the economy of ancient Greece, particularly Athens, interesting on many counts. From the transcript: Athenians, would be called in the center of the main city of Athens. And at that point any citizen -- that is free adult male native of Athens over age 18 -- could come to the assembly, typically ...


2

You were paid for participating in assemblies. You could marry Athenian citizens.



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