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My question is, from historical view, does this (however simplistic it may be) make any sense? Would a different terrain type be more appropriate? I suspect it makes little historical sense, and it's probably not appropriate to think of it as terrain bonuses or penalties for specific unit types - or at least not with those generic types of units. For one ...


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It's probably alcohol, with tobacco (nicotine) and caffeine at distant second and third. These drugs don't directly enhance performance, but are great at maintaining morale. In the case of alcohol, although it impairs performance and is easily abused, can also increase courage - see the term Dutch Courage. Many historical militaries also practiced a "last ...


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The natural drug epinephrine (adrenaline).


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There is a (pejorative) French expression saoul comme un Polonais (drunk like a Pole). This expression comes from the Somosierra battle in 1808 where Polish light cavalry won for the French, after what the survivors were presented to Napoleon. French generals were quite jealous and mentioned that the Poles were drunk. To what Napoleon responded version ...


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Liquor (sake) was an important ingredient of preparing Japanese soldiers for suicidal Banzai Attacks. The most important of these took place in June 1944 on Saipan, which contained supplies, including liquor, for Japan's Pacific islands.


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Pearl Harbor. Sunday morning on a Navy Base. Chau Doc during the Tet Offensive.


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It is well known that Russian front line troops were given 100 gram of vodka daily. Sometimes this norm was doubled. This was introduced by Stalin's personal order during the Finnish war 1940, and the order remained in force for the Soviet-German war. This resulted in many cases of alcoholism among the Soviet soldiers. The details can be found in Russian ...


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It is rumoured that on the evening of June 15, 1815, Marechal Ney may have enjoyed too much of M. Dumont's Burgundy in Gosselies, and that his late start to Quatre Bras the following morning may be in consequence: According to local tradition Ney's first care was to have a bed prepared 'with two or three mattresses'. Then he proceeded to do honour to his ...


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This is quite small in comparison to major battles, but it still remains an interesting note on how some battles which were lost are commemorated today! Vatican State, also known as the Holy See, commemorates the Sack of Rome of May 6, 1527 with the swearing in ceremony of all new recruits of the Pontifical Swiss Guards. The Swiss Guard also happens ...


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One example, which I heard about in Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast (disclaimer, he's not a historian and sometimes prefers good story telling to historical accuracy and uncertainty), is from the siege of M√ľnster (Germany, not Ireland) in 1534. The story goes that the Prince-Bishop leading the siege planned to attack at sunrise on the morning of the ...


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It just doesn't seem plausible to my ignorant brain just to see an enemy army and shout "ATTAAACK!" without first saying something to the enemy commander, especially in a situation where it was the respective armies first encounter. That makes me think there might have been a formal and cultural way of doing it. Ideally, you'd like to shout "attack!" ...


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I have looked at the descriptions of many of the battles, especially the 100 Years' War, and most of them were preceded by negotiations, leading us to believe that it may have been customary and was at the very least common.


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Sounds like a villain in a James Bond movie. Seriously...dispatching emissaries prior to any contact with friend or foe alike was I believe it was considered normative in Roman Times especially prior to giving battle as there are no greater victories than ones that require no battle be given in the first place. This would change during Imperial Rome though. ...


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So most people look to movies when they think of War but this is the greatest lie ever told. Most War is simply the act of nothing getting done and even less happening (The Front.) World War 1 in the West is the textbook example of this...with the Battle of Virginia during the US Civil War an excellent precursor. It was quite common in the latter for Johnny ...


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The existing answers provide detail on why side attacks and real breakthroughs were impossible in practice. I want to add a theoretic level why strategists might also wouldn't want them. To answer your question with emphasize on the "accept" part, I would like to refer you to a military theorist who foresaw some developments and is thus still taught at many ...


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Generals tend to "fight the last war." That said, there are periods of defensive predominance that shape later periods of offensive predominance, and are shaped by earlier periods of offensive predominance. For instance,offensive cavalry ruled supreme between the invention of the stirrup, and the invention of defensive missile weapons such as the long bow ...


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There were no "sides" where one might perform a side-attack. After the initial German push was defeated at the First Battle of the Marne, the British and French attacked the Germans at the First Battle of the Aisne. There, both the Germans and the Entente found how effective entrenching was against attacking troops. Having failed the frontal attacks and ...


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sides got locked into relatively short lines of heavily defended trench warfare with little prospect of gains for either side. The lines on the Western Front were not by any stretch of the imagination "short". The Western Front ran all the way from Switzerland to the Atlantic Ocean. Side attacks? Well the Race to the Sea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...



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