Hot answers tagged

10

Yes. In 1730 and again in 1789, Britain sent convict ships to Newfoundland. However, neither experiment was successful as they found that St. John's could not incorporate the scores of new residents. There were scattered instances of a handful of convicts being sent to Newfoundland for seven-year terms, but no other large-scale attempts to export convicts to ...


7

Sikhs from the Punjab and Nepalese Gurkha's were purposely recruited into the British army because these two regions were the hardest to conquer during the British Conquest. References: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikhs_in_the_British_Indian_Army https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Gurkha


6

The British Rulers of India were basically racist people. There existed hoaxes and pseudo-ethnologies. They had based the recruitments to their forces explicitly from these group of people. The Wikipedia article illustrates quite wholly the concept that existed at that time. The doctrine of 'martial races' postulated that the qualities that make a useful ...


5

The hexagram already appeared on the historical flag of nigeria (british colony and protectorate). Both coins date from that time, since Nigeria got independent in 1960. So, i think the question should be why the hexagram was associated with Nigeria during the epoch before 1960. Extensive information regarding this question can be found at ...


5

In 1937, the Indian Independence Movement conducted provincial elections that clearly demonstrated the will of the people. It also "wound down" an earlier campaign of armed resistance. Finally, Indians gave "qualified" support to Britain in World War II. The Indian Independence Movement showed the world that the Indians were capable of self-government. In ...


4

People talked about the British Empire, but nobody ever actually officially created a British Empire. There was no monarch of the British Empire, no prime minister of the British Empire, not cabinet of the British empire, no parliament of the British Empire, etc. There was merely the United kingdom and a bunch of colonies controlled by it with no central ...


3

To answer your question on the impact of Indian Independence movement in obtaining Indian Independence, we need to look on both British and the Indian sides simultaneously. Indian scenario before WW1: India's fight to self rule began from the time of English East India company initially in South India by Puli Thevar, Pazhasi Raja(Pychy Raja), Veerapandiya ...


3

The foreign policy of most north European countries, including Britain (and Norway), was directed south, that is to warmer climes. Most European countries neglected (or were blindsided by) regions to the north of them. England's interests lay in France, the Low Countries, Germany, the Mediterranean, and even New England and the 13 colonies, all of which are ...


3

I don't know of any such official policy. It would not have made much sense to deliberately and continuously start wars with other "great powers" of the time. If you take, for example, the 1807 attack on Copenhagen, this was specifically motivated by reports that Napoleon was pressuring the Danes to use their fleet against the British or to give it to ...


3

The Royal Sussex Regiment Brighton War Memorial notes the following timeline of deaths and activities: Barttelot, Capt. Sir Walter George: killed in action at Retief's Nek, July 23rd, 1900 (1st battalion) Bleach, Pvt. Frank - died at the Hospital, Bloemfontein, of enteric fever, on 14th March 1901. Brookshaw, Pvt. Benjamin A - At Krugersdorp, ...


2

There is no formal ritual which bestows the title "Emperor". The term doesn't have a legal meaning, there no copyright, nothing to prevent Joshua Norton from declaring himself to be the Emperor of North America. (Pedants may argue that the term derives from Imperator, which does have a formal requirement and bestowal ritual, but since the fall of Rome that ...


2

MY father was born in Hong Kong (in 1923), and he always made the distinction between a British "citizen" (born in the British Isles), and a British "subject" (born elsewhere in the Empire). It was the difference between being a British "native" or "colonial."


1

From Wikipedia: Outside the United Kingdom, the remaining Gaelic nobility of Ireland continue informally to use their archaic provincial titles. As Ireland was nominally under the overlordship of the English Crown for between the 12th and 16th centuries, the Gaelic system coexisted with the British system. A modern survivor of this coexistence is ...


1

In the 38 minute Zanzibar war, the British destroyed the Sultan's palace. Does that count?


1

I hope, On 2nd August 1858 the Parliament passed a bill to take over the administration of India from the East Indian Company by the British Crown. The title of Viceroy was introduced for the supreme representation of the British Government in India. The provision of this bill called for the dissolution of the British East India Company that was ruling ...


1

I don't think bidets were ever as popular in the UK as we believed. I've heard from a lot of people in the UK and they often say they don't have one nor do they know anyone that does have one. I think Crocodile Dundee put it in the heads of people that everyone in the UK has a bidet. Bidets are more common in the Middle East, as well as Italy. The newer ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible