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9

Britain never saw a compelling reason to take them. On the other hand, the Faroes were strategic to Denmark, because of their supply route to Iceland and Greenland. So it was probably the fact that other countries wanted the islands much more. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Faroe_Islands The first settlers in the Faroe Islands were Celts ...


7

Yes. Only five years previous, in 1807, the British fleet burned down Copenhagen. This was a huge loss to civilization because previously to that the King of Denmark had ordered that all the old viking manuscripts in the country be collected together and brought to the capital. So, this huge wealth of history and genealogy was destroyed.


7

Prior to 1930 (1946), actually, the U.S. had claims in this area, through its possession of the Philippines. This is because the Philippines are one of 10 so-called ASEAN (Southeast Asian) nations. Even to this day, the U.S. has certain treaty rights in the Philippines. That is to say that the U.S. retains a defensive interest in Philippine affairs, even ...


6

as all battles in the period were decided by one side giving way and giving up the fight by running or fleeing, the men were not robots and morale was a very important factor and it soldiers failing to be steady and press forward or whole ground was a regular occurrence casualties in battle were often not particularly huge, the volleys often rapidly ...


5

Following the Battle of the Nile (Aboukir Bay), the bulk of the British fleet, including Nelson's flagship Vanguard, returned to the western Mediterranean (either to Gibraltar or to Naples) in order to repair and refit. Only a small covering naval force under Sir Thomas Troubridge was left to blockade the French transports in Alexandria. This small flotilla ...


5

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kohima Meanwhile, the commander of the British Fourteenth Army, Lieutenant General William Slim, belatedly realised (partly from Japanese documents that had been captured at Sangshak) that a whole Japanese division was moving towards Kohima.[15] He and his staff had originally believed that, because of the ...


5

Before railways the most efficient mode of land transportation was by river - and the Ganges River system runs nearly three quarters of the way from the opium fields (in what is modern Pakistan and Afghanistan) to Calcutta. The only comparable port facility would likely have been Bombay (modern Mumbai), but without the advantage either of large scale river ...


5

Calcutta had two functions. One, it was an assembly point for opium gathered from other parts of India because many rivers flowed in that direction from near the opium fields as Pieter mentioned. Second, it was a port in the part of India (east) "nearest" to China and under British control. Third, as of 1772, Calcutta was the headquarters of the British ...


5

The hexagram already appeared on the historical flag of nigeria (british colony and protectorate). Both coins date from that time, since Nigeria got independent in 1960. So, i think the question should be why the hexagram was associated with Nigeria during the epoch before 1960. Extensive information regarding this question can be found at http://www....


5

In 1937, the Indian Independence Movement conducted provincial elections that clearly demonstrated the will of the people. It also "wound down" an earlier campaign of armed resistance. Finally, Indians gave "qualified" support to Britain in World War II. The Indian Independence Movement showed the world that the Indians were capable of self-government. In ...


4

People talked about the British Empire, but nobody ever actually officially created a British Empire. There was no monarch of the British Empire, no prime minister of the British Empire, not cabinet of the British empire, no parliament of the British Empire, etc. There was merely the United kingdom and a bunch of colonies controlled by it with no central ...


4

The Royal Sussex Regiment Brighton War Memorial notes the following timeline of deaths and activities: Barttelot, Capt. Sir Walter George: killed in action at Retief's Nek, July 23rd, 1900 (1st battalion) Bleach, Pvt. Frank - died at the Hospital, Bloemfontein, of enteric fever, on 14th March 1901. Brookshaw, Pvt. Benjamin A - At Krugersdorp, ...


4

You don't have to know, it just happens. Its basic economics. Supply and demand are intersecting diagonal curves, the intersection of which is the market price. As supply of an item goes up, you shove its diagonal curve higher up the supply axis (to the right in the graph above). That puts the intersection between the two lower on the price axis. In short,...


3

'In perils oft': romantic biographies illustrative of the adventurous life (1886) provides three versions of Gordon's death, pp. 533-534. These are: He was slain by gunfire while on his way to the Austrian consulate He was killed on the courtyard steps of the governors palace He was shot while in his study, reading his Bible All three stories are told ...


3

To answer your question on the impact of Indian Independence movement in obtaining Indian Independence, we need to look on both British and the Indian sides simultaneously. Indian scenario before WW1: India's fight to self rule began from the time of English East India company initially in South India by Puli Thevar, Pazhasi Raja(Pychy Raja), Veerapandiya ...


3

The foreign policy of most north European countries, including Britain (and Norway), was directed south, that is to warmer climes. Most European countries neglected (or were blindsided by) regions to the north of them. England's interests lay in France, the Low Countries, Germany, the Mediterranean, and even New England and the 13 colonies, all of which are ...


3

I don't know of any such official policy. It would not have made much sense to deliberately and continuously start wars with other "great powers" of the time. If you take, for example, the 1807 attack on Copenhagen, this was specifically motivated by reports that Napoleon was pressuring the Danes to use their fleet against the British or to give it to ...


3

The Tea Act did not involve new taxes.It was, however, designed to give the British East India Company (BEIC) a monopoly on tea trade. Prior to this, Americans drank a lot of untaxed tea from other sources (including smuggling). The monopoly given to the BEIC meant that all tea would now be taxed. The BEIC was struggling under the burden of taxes it had ...


2

MY father was born in Hong Kong (in 1923), and he always made the distinction between a British "citizen" (born in the British Isles), and a British "subject" (born elsewhere in the Empire). It was the difference between being a British "native" or "colonial."


2

There is no formal ritual which bestows the title "Emperor". The term doesn't have a legal meaning, there no copyright, nothing to prevent Joshua Norton from declaring himself to be the Emperor of North America. (Pedants may argue that the term derives from Imperator, which does have a formal requirement and bestowal ritual, but since the fall of Rome that ...


2

Tom Au has offered a solid answer about the narrow view regarding colonial claims, but those are in 2016 mostly irrelevant. What is more relevant are claims, current and future, made under the current protocols for territorial waters of UN members and exclusive economic zones. This informs the rights to resources in seas and continental shelves. (ILOS is ...


2

This newspaper clipping from 1895 gives more information to the whereabouts of the Europeans in Khartoum. It states that "in 1887, the prisoners include four Italian sisters, 2 priests and 2 laymen".


2

In theory, history should not enter into this. China signed the UNCLOS, which specifies exactly what their territorial rights are in that area. They clearly did so with enthusiasm, as they were one of the charter signers way back in 1982. If they didn't want to abide by that agreement, they shouldn't have promised to do so. The US (or history prior to 16 ...


1

In typical European armies, troops were trained on a conscription basis. The training is a mix of the general background of the soldiers and what was expected of them in a battle. However, there were also volunteer armies and large-scale mercenaries, but mostly we're talking conscription. In a European conscription army, men would be called or pressed ...


1

The French campaign in Egypt and Syria had ended by August of 1801, with their defeat and surrender at Alexandria. Napoleon had abandoned them two years previous, when he returned to France, and reorganized the government in a coup against the Directorate. Where did the British troops used against the French in Egypt and Syria come from? In the earlier ...


1

It is important that even though Napoleon was beginning to have land superiority in Europe after the Revolutionary wars, the extent of Royal Navy's reach was far superior than that of French Navy. Specifically, Royal Navy had a Mediterranean Fleet, with a base in Gibraltar. That should more or less answer the first question. As for the second question, it ...


1

Annihilated? British administration was beneficial for the Indian economy. After the British left, the Indian economy declined very significantly. In 1900, India was ranked the #36 country in the world by GDP per capita. Today, it is ranked #135, right below Nigeria. To put that in perspective: if India were #36 today, it would be comparable to Israel (#35)...


1

From Wikipedia: Outside the United Kingdom, the remaining Gaelic nobility of Ireland continue informally to use their archaic provincial titles. As Ireland was nominally under the overlordship of the English Crown for between the 12th and 16th centuries, the Gaelic system coexisted with the British system. A modern survivor of this coexistence is ...


1

It may be noted that although popular US history often describes Great Britain as the mightiest power in the world at the time, Britain was rather puny in the size and power of its army. The Chinese Empire and some other Asian powers had armies in the hundreds of thousands, and at least four European powers, France, Russia, Austria, and Prussia, also had ...


1

In the 38 minute Zanzibar war, the British destroyed the Sultan's palace. Does that count?



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