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12

The British army simply didn't have enough soldiers available when the war started. Per the Wikipedia page, their total military strength was around 45,000 men, and Lord North and General Howe didn't think this was nearly enough to succeed. Toward this end, the parliament authorized the raising of 55,000 soldiers and 45,000 sailors in October of 17751. ...


10

Yes. In 1730 and again in 1789, Britain sent convict ships to Newfoundland. However, neither experiment was successful as they found that St. John's could not incorporate the scores of new residents. There were scattered instances of a handful of convicts being sent to Newfoundland for seven-year terms, but no other large-scale attempts to export convicts to ...


7

Sikhs from the Punjab and Nepalese Gurkha's were purposely recruited into the British army because these two regions were the hardest to conquer during the British Conquest. References: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikhs_in_the_British_Indian_Army https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Gurkha


6

The British Rulers of India were basically racist people. There existed hoaxes and pseudo-ethnologies. They had based the recruitments to their forces explicitly from these group of people. The Wikipedia article illustrates quite wholly the concept that existed at that time. The doctrine of 'martial races' postulated that the qualities that make a useful ...


5

In "The Bloodybacks - The British Serviceman in North America 1655-1783" Reginald Hargreaves states the British soldiers assualting Bunker Hill carried 125lb. "Every man was loaded down with his full kit, which, with knapsack, blanket and ammunition, totaled at least a dead weight of one hundred and twenty five pounds". Page 243


5

Because it suited British interests to do so. It seems you are wondering why the Poona Pact was reversed, but this should not be surprising. The Poona Pact was a compromise between Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi, designed to reconcile the Untouchables and the Hindus against British Imperialism. In contrast, the Government of India Act 1935 was an ...


5

The hexagram already appeared on the historical flag of nigeria (british colony and protectorate). Both coins date from that time, since Nigeria got independent in 1960. So, i think the question should be why the hexagram was associated with Nigeria during the epoch before 1960. Extensive information regarding this question can be found at ...


4

In 1937, the Indian Independence Movement conducted provincial elections that clearly demonstrated the will of the people. It also "wound down" an earlier campaign of armed resistance. Finally, Indians gave "qualified" support to Britain in World War II. The Indian Independence Movement showed the world that the Indians were capable of self-government. In ...


4

People talked about the British Empire, but nobody ever actually officially created a British Empire. There was no monarch of the British Empire, no prime minister of the British Empire, not cabinet of the British empire, no parliament of the British Empire, etc. There was merely the United kingdom and a bunch of colonies controlled by it with no central ...


3

To answer your question on the impact of Indian Independence movement in obtaining Indian Independence, we need to look on both British and the Indian sides simultaneously. Indian scenario before WW1: India's fight to self rule began from the time of English East India company initially in South India by Puli Thevar, Pazhasi Raja(Pychy Raja), Veerapandiya ...


3

I don't know of any such official policy. It would not have made much sense to deliberately and continuously start wars with other "great powers" of the time. If you take, for example, the 1807 attack on Copenhagen, this was specifically motivated by reports that Napoleon was pressuring the Danes to use their fleet against the British or to give it to ...


3

The Royal Sussex Regiment Brighton War Memorial notes the following timeline of deaths and activities: Barttelot, Capt. Sir Walter George: killed in action at Retief's Nek, July 23rd, 1900 (1st battalion) Bleach, Pvt. Frank - died at the Hospital, Bloemfontein, of enteric fever, on 14th March 1901. Brookshaw, Pvt. Benjamin A - At Krugersdorp, ...


3

The takeover of India, creating the British Raj, was the first step to controlling India. After the 1857 uprising, the British rewarded those who had not joined in the rebellion. It was also felt that both the princes and the large land-holders, by not joining the rebellion, had proved to be, in Lord Canning's words, "breakwaters in a storm". They ...


3

This seems to be the rulers' method of "divide and rule", and largely to prevent the Congress from getting too strong: ...ensuring that the Congress could never rule alone or gain enough seats to bring down the government.. This was done by over-representing the Princes, by giving every possible minority the right to separately vote for ...


3

Eliminating the distinctive white dome would be only one part of a camouflage plan. It's a big and delicate job and has to be done in advance. All other elements of the camouflage plan can be done when there is an air raid alert, but they're worthless if there's a big white dome showing. First thing to realize is the world looks very different at 15,000 ...


2

The reason why is that India was on a silver standard and England was on a gold standard in which pounds were denominated. To convert India to pounds sterling, you would have had to convert the whole country to a gold standard first, which was discussed occasionally, but was more or less impractical because India had no central bank like England did. To ...


2

There is no formal ritual which bestows the title "Emperor". The term doesn't have a legal meaning, there no copyright, nothing to prevent Joshua Norton from declaring himself to be the Emperor of North America. (Pedants may argue that the term derives from Imperator, which does have a formal requirement and bestowal ritual, but since the fall of Rome that ...


2

As someone who studied in Indonesia (former colony of Dutch) and Singapore (former colony of British), I can say very well the difference lies in the education investment made by the British. This simple slides (slide 21) shows very clearly the investment made by the British in their crown colony. The Dutch, however, did not do the same for its colonies ...


2

As a broad generality, Britain is a naval power, not an infantry power. Britain is protect by "wooden walls". At the time of the US war for independence, Britain had just completed the Seven Years War and was trying to demobilize the officers from that war; Britain couldn't afford to pay half pay to their retired officers let along staff up a new military ...


2

In 1776, Britain had a population of 9 million (and numerous commitments all over the world). "America" had a population of 3 million. This compares to 25 million in France, and an even larger number in "Germany" (taking into account all the German states). With "only" a three to one numerical advantage, diluted by the vast expanse of the Atlantic Ocean, ...


2

MY father was born in Hong Kong (in 1923), and he always made the distinction between a British "citizen" (born in the British Isles), and a British "subject" (born elsewhere in the Empire). It was the difference between being a British "native" or "colonial."


1

From Wikipedia: Outside the United Kingdom, the remaining Gaelic nobility of Ireland continue informally to use their archaic provincial titles. As Ireland was nominally under the overlordship of the English Crown for between the 12th and 16th centuries, the Gaelic system coexisted with the British system. A modern survivor of this coexistence is ...


1

One of the primary aims of the Government of India Act was to weaken the rising Indian governing class, specifically, the Congress Party. For instance, Burma was separated from India altogether, and a number of Indian provinces were subdivided for "gerrymandering purposes. The idea of having "separate but equal" electorates for the classes at the bottom was ...


1

You need to realize that the Government of India Act was passed by Britain, not India, since India was a British colony at the time. Whatever Gandhi worked out with the other Indians has no effect on what the Brits do unless they convinced them it's for better for British interests, which they didn't.


1

I don't think bidets were ever as popular in the UK as we believed. I've heard from a lot of people in the UK and they often say they don't have one nor do they know anyone that does have one. I think Crocodile Dundee put it in the heads of people that everyone in the UK has a bidet. Bidets are more common in the Middle East, as well as Italy. The newer ...


1

Archangelsk: they did use this route to supply Russia. The main problems were that it was only open during the Summer and even in the Summer it is dangerous for ships. Persia: This was not a viable route in 1916 due to a lack of railroads. Trans-Siberian Railway: This very long route was used during the war, however, it was unreliable and the British did ...



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