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2

In theory, history should not enter into this. China signed the UNCLOS, which specifies exactly what their territorial rights are in that area. They clearly did so with enthusiasm, as they were one of the charter signers way back in 1982. If they didn't want to abide by that agreement, they shouldn't have promised to do so. The US (or history prior to 16 ...


2

Tom Au has offered a solid answer about the narrow view regarding colonial claims, but those are in 2016 mostly irrelevant. What is more relevant are claims, current and future, made under the current protocols for territorial waters of UN members and exclusive economic zones. This informs the rights to resources in seas and continental shelves. (ILOS is ...


4

The Tea Act did not involve new taxes.It was, however, designed to give the British East India Company (BEIC) a monopoly on tea trade. Prior to this, Americans drank a lot of untaxed tea from other sources (including smuggling). The monopoly given to the BEIC meant that all tea would now be taxed. The BEIC was struggling under the burden of taxes it had ...


7

Prior to 1930 (1946), actually, the U.S. had claims in this area, through its possession of the Philippines. This is because the Philippines are one of 10 so-called ASEAN (Southeast Asian) nations. Even to this day, the U.S. has certain treaty rights in the Philippines. That is to say that the U.S. retains a defensive interest in Philippine affairs, even ...


1

In typical European armies, troops were trained on a conscription basis. The training is a mix of the general background of the soldiers and what was expected of them in a battle. However, there were also volunteer armies and large-scale mercenaries, but mostly we're talking conscription. In a European conscription army, men would be called or pressed ...


6

as all battles in the period were decided by one side giving way and giving up the fight by running or fleeing, the men were not robots and morale was a very important factor and it soldiers failing to be steady and press forward or whole ground was a regular occurrence casualties in battle were often not particularly huge, the volleys often rapidly ...


-1

Most jobs in those days, farm and factory work, was nearly as dangerous as the military.In the military, young men at least got a uniform, more or less enough to eat, and a place to sleep, which was more than many migrant farm or factory workers could count on. And a few were attracted by opportunities for travel and adventure and plunder. Battles were ...


0

The question here is how did those chartered companies become defunct. While there were some spectacular failures like the South Sea Bubble - most companies would have evolved, split, consolidated, and so on as markets and legislation shifted (nationalisation, anti-monopoly, etc)... Meaning, there are probably many companies that are descendant of those ...


5

Before railways the most efficient mode of land transportation was by river - and the Ganges River system runs nearly three quarters of the way from the opium fields (in what is modern Pakistan and Afghanistan) to Calcutta. The only comparable port facility would likely have been Bombay (modern Mumbai), but without the advantage either of large scale river ...


5

Calcutta had two functions. One, it was an assembly point for opium gathered from other parts of India because many rivers flowed in that direction from near the opium fields as Pieter mentioned. Second, it was a port in the part of India (east) "nearest" to China and under British control. Third, as of 1772, Calcutta was the headquarters of the British ...


0

There is a very substantial collection of Indian war posters in the Imperial War Museum collection in London. Illiteracy doesn't mean no equation at all with the world of print, and illustration.



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