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14

According to the graph on the World Population wiki page, global population at 1000 BC was about 50 million. The vast majority of that would have been in the areas of intensive farming, which at that time means Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, and perhaps the Indus valley. So that number doesn't seem completely out of line. However, Israel is much more marginal ...


12

The largest city in Europe was Knossos in Minoan Crete, which according to Wikipedia reached as much as 100,000 people by 1600 BCE (Pendlebury & Evans 2003, p. 35). In comparison, the cities of Ur in Mesopotamia and Memphis in Egypt attained 60,000 people by 2000 BCE. The Mycenaean culture of Greece is well known to us via Greek legends. A warlike ...


11

Interesting. I'd never heard this before, so I went digging myself. It appears that Michigan's prehistory of copper working really fired some people's imaginations. If you look there are even fanciful stories about Phonecians crossing the Atlantic to get at Great Lakes copper! There's a great paper online by what appears to be a very frustrated ...


9

The transition from Bronze Age to Iron Age in Europe occurred later than the transition in the Middle East. It started in the south and gradually worked its way north. It was most certainly a period of bloodshed, but then that's been true of most of european history, hasn't it? You might imagine pitched battles of armies, one outfitted in old bronze ...


9

This is a great question, but I am finding it to be very difficult to answer. The 4th and 3rd millennia's are proving to be very challenging in terms of finding historical documentation relating to specific cities (as this timeframe is often considered Pre-History). That being said, it does seem that archaeology has provided us with some clues as to how ...


8

The problem with answering this is that Europe for the most part was illiterate at the time. We do know from the literate areas that there was tremendous upheval in Fertile Crescent at about this time. In this period the (illiterate) Dorians wiped out Mycenean civilization, plunging the Greek area into a dark age. Technically this was Europe. Then a horde ...


6

c or ca means circa, which means approximately.


5

It is entirely possible that the whole story is fabricated. Genesis of Greek myths has been analysed by Paul Veyne; the corner point is that during Antiquity, there was no real difference between history and mythology, as practised by authors. The narrative was what mattered, so a "true" story was a story that "made sense" in a literary way. In the case of ...


3

In the Three-Age System, the defining characteristic of the Bronze Age that earlier ages didn't have was the beginnings of urban civilisation. This happens to coincide with bronze and copper technology, hence the metal-based classification of "Bronze". In practice the really interesting part of a game or book exploring the Bronze Age isn't the metal in ...


2

The exact population is a bit unclear. Estimates for the time period fall in between 2 and 4 million. This area of Egypt was one of the more densely populated areas in the world at that time due to the fertility of the Nile delta. In the Biblical account, Exodus 12:30 says "for there was not a house without someone dead". Family size is also tough to nail ...


2

I would speculate that chariots weren't used as much on Greek turf due to their lack of maneuverability on hilly terrain. On the plains of Egypt they would have a deadly impact, but try to drag them though hills and orchards, let alone the mountains… Persians did try to use cavalry, but even that proved to be ineffective, and possibly had cost them defeat ...


1

Possibly the Battle of Kadesh. Check out this video.


1

I do not believe that advances in metallurgy could give some societies any crucial military advantage. This is because iron weapons are easily captured and bought. Even if a society had no iron works, it still could easily acquire iron weapons and the archaeological findings support that there are plenty of foreign-produced metal weapons (mostly produced by ...


1

The Book of Exodus, as near as scholars can tell, was written during the time of the Babylonian Exile (in the 6th Century BC). That means any actual real events depicted would have had to have been part of an oral tradition among the Jewish people for nearly 1,000 years. Expecting such a work to be historically factual is rather unreasonable. During the ...


1

According to this site the population was around 100 million and the Jewish population was 2 million people, fitting the biblical narrative. But it could be that this data was extracted solely from the bible, and not from other sources.



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