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-1

I guess, people look for fixed cycles in nature. the cycle of the moon, the wandering of the shadow on its surface takes 28 days, divide the horizontal axis of the moon into 4 equal parts you get for each part 7 days.


3

The solar year and the lunar month (and the solar day) are obvious, natural cycles of time. Since none of them is an integer multiple of another, a wide range of calendars have been created to reconcile them. They tend to still be in use because they've got a great deal of inertia (and often, religious tradition) behind them. There are no natural ...


2

In the Sinitic culture sphere, the seven day week as we know it became popularised with the adoption of the Gregorian calendar. However, prior to the modern era, these countries had an notion of seven days corresponding to the Seven Lights (七曜): Venus, Jupiter, Mercury, Mars, Saturn, Moon, Sun. In other words, the Far Eastern seven day week was inspired by ...


11

We have an enormous amount of evidence for the ancient Babylonian calendar, but no evidence at all for a seven-day week in ancient Babylonia. In the ancient world there were two forms of the seven-day week. First, the Jewish week (eventually adopted by Christians and Muslims) has numbered days from one (Sunday) to six (Friday) and the Sabbath on the seventh ...


4

The seven day week is not necessarily universal, although it has spread through most of the world as certain cultures have dominated the globe. The Romans and then the Christians more or less pressed certain cultural elements on everyone. Why 7 days? The easiest explanation is probably that there are roughly 28 days in a lunar cycle and so, dividing that ...



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