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1

The convention of assuming the first of the year to be assigned to March 25 in 1155 (the ascension of Henry II) is due to Bond's "Handy-Book of Rules and Tables for verifying Dates". This convention is just an approximation. In England various conventions were used, sometimes simultaneously by different people. In general, the church in England gradually ...


-4

I doubt that William could write. In the Saxon Chronicle, the coronation is listed as one of the events of "An. MLXVI." This is what it says exactly: Translated from Saxon, what this says: Then, on midwinter's day Aeldred blessed him as king at Westminster... In medieval manuscripts everything is dated relative to feasts or specific days, so it ...


7

Despite Lives of the Twelve Caesars there were far more emperors than months to name after them. it is not certain to me that Gaius Julius Caesar and Augustus ordered months named after themselves. It is possible that those honors ere decreed posthumously by the senate (allegedly without being prodded by the heir) - you should look it up. The senate was ...


13

Actually several did: Caligula renamed September to Germanicus (Suetonius, Caligula, 15) in memory of his father. Nero renamed April to Neronium (Suetonius, Nero, 55).


24

Suetonius has this to report about Tiberius, the second emperor and the third Caesar: [H]e at first played a most unassuming part, almost humbler than that of a private citizen. Of many high honours he accepted only a few of the more modest. He barely consented to allow his birthday, which came at the time of the Plebeian games in the Circus, to be ...



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