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8

This is still a mystery. It was probably a combination of several factors, though. The government's focus shifted. Coincidentally or not, after 1433 the Oirat Mongols emerged as a serious threat. Their chieftain, Toγan, united Mongolia under the figurehead Taisun Khan in 1434. Oirat power grew further under his son, Esen. He incorporated neighbouring ...


7

The short answer is because the Japanese government does not designate it as a public holiday. Officially, China does in fact celebrate New Year's Day (元旦) on the Western (Gregorian) 1 January. In contrast, the traditional lunar new year is a public holiday named Spring Festival (春节). Since the latter is a longer holiday, combined with ancient traditions, ...


3

I'm not an expert in either Chinese language or culture, but I know that there is discussion about whether Chinese has so many dialects or if those are different languages that share a common writing system. Prior to the spread of telecommunications (e.g., radio, television) and automobiles, there was no way to transmit audio on such a broad scale. I expect ...


1

It is not an either/or situation. In China they celebrate Gregorian New Year on 1 January and the traditional lunar New Year as well. It is the same in Vietnam.


1

The Europeans got no land but concessions from China, mostly in trade apart from signing over Hong Kong to the British which was about it. The europeans could not conduct a a land invasion into China proper, the defeats were mainly in naval engagements and even then the Qing managed to defeat the Portuguese, French and Dutch on several occasion so the idea ...



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