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After reading the interesting explanations, it strikes me that there were at least two reasons why the western European nations, at least those with significant maritime capabilities, sought to colonize: (1) they had no significant military advantages over the other nearby nations. Colonial expansion into the neighboring countries would have been a costly ...


1

In the early 15th century, China had huge junks that dwarfed the ships of their European counterparts. China's Treasure Fleet sailed throughout the eastern Pacific and northern Indian oceans. By the latter part of the 15th century, China had turned inward. Building or working on a junk with more than two masts became a capital crime. Who knows what the ...


6

Notice how big China is? There's a reason for that; it's only a semantic difference between calling conquered territory a "colony" and simply part of your country. EDIT: Someone pointed out in comments that the term "colonize" means something different from "expanding borders". So I should clarify what I mean: yes the terms are different, but it's just a ...


52

They did. Depending on the preferred definition of "colonies", Chinese states in fact established innumerable colonies throughout history. Certainly the most common form was overland colonies created in conquered "barbarian" territories. This processes lasts up till today; Beijing's sinicisation and settlement policies in Tibet and Xinjiang are viewed with ...


5

China did have colonies. All of the islands in Asia reachable by junk have been colonized by the Chinese at one time or another: Malaysia, the Phillipines, Taiwan, etc. The far ranging colonies of the European powers made in the 1500-1800 period cannot be compared because China did not have types of sea-faring vessels necessary. Another factor is that China ...


0

Despite appearances the “Han Chinese” don’t really conform to the stereotype of an ethnic group. The fact that they speak diverse local languages is just one aspect of this. South-central China can be divided into a number of regional systems, each typically centered around the drainage basin of a major river, that do not correspond to administrative ...


0

The first cannon the Chinese had, according to the Portuguese were three (3) cannons, presumably ship cannon, manned by Portuguese crews which the emperor specifically requested of them in 1621. Three cannons are not enough to affect a war in which there are many thousands fighting over vast distances. Also, ship cannons use carriages which are not effective ...


-2

China earned her place in UN by heroic D-day first wave assaults, some 5000 soldiers from Chinese 52nd army died on beaches of Normandy securing allied forces landing. 52nd army ( 29,000 men strong ) lost a total of some 10,000 casualty, 9000 wounded at the end of European campaign. This WWII piece of military history was sealed off for publication by then ...


4

I'm not an expert in either Chinese language or culture, but I know that there is discussion about whether Chinese has so many dialects or if those are different languages that share a common writing system. Prior to the spread of telecommunications (e.g., radio, television) and automobiles, there was no way to transmit audio on such a broad scale. I expect ...


1

The Europeans got no land but concessions from China, mostly in trade apart from signing over Hong Kong to the British which was about it. The europeans could not conduct a a land invasion into China proper, the defeats were mainly in naval engagements and even then the Qing managed to defeat the Portuguese, French and Dutch on several occasion so the idea ...


8

This is still a mystery. It was probably a combination of several factors, though. The government's focus shifted. Coincidentally or not, after 1433 the Oirat Mongols emerged as a serious threat. Their chieftain, Toγan, united Mongolia under the figurehead Taisun Khan in 1434. Oirat power grew further under his son, Esen. He incorporated neighbouring ...


-4

Firstly, weapon technology is difficult to research because it is usually secret and gunpowder is no exception, so most important evidence is purely indirect; you have infer the invention from other evidence, such as metallurgical evidence. Secondly the idea that gunpowder came by the "silk road" or that it originated in China, Mongolia, Arabia or other ...


7

The short answer is because the Japanese government does not designate it as a public holiday. Officially, China does in fact celebrate New Year's Day (元旦) on the Western (Gregorian) 1 January. In contrast, the traditional lunar new year is a public holiday named Spring Festival (春节). Since the latter is a longer holiday, combined with ancient traditions, ...


1

It is not an either/or situation. In China they celebrate Gregorian New Year on 1 January and the traditional lunar New Year as well. It is the same in Vietnam.


-1

Trotsky was denounced as a hate figure within the Chinese communist party as early as the Sino-Japanese War. Rana Mitta in China's War With Japan, describes purges taking place within the CCP even while they're battling the Japanese (and their Nationalist "allies"): Wang Shiwei was one of those who feel victim ... first posters appeared denouncing him. ...



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