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1

This question depend on what you mean by control. Just before the Japanese invaded Manchuria, the Nationalists controlled the most territory. But usually its a local warlord pledging to obey the government, so in reality the Nanjing government doesn't really have much control over local issues. But these warlords were made generals of the government and ...


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Here's the thing. They made plans to kill Zhang too, if the communists came close to getting him. Yang was only killed after the president at the time, Li, ordered his release. So we can conclude Chiang was willing to keep them under guard, but will not tolerate letting them go alive.


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The guy above is correct. 1) Only idiots would try to conquer the entire China. It was extremely hard to maintain. For example, the Mongols had to chase the last Song emperor all the way down to the Guangdong China by a massive naval fleet. The Qing dynasty had to constantly watch out for possible secessions in western China like Tibet and Xinjiang. Do you ...


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I believe it's partly to do with coastal access. Countries and city states particularly in older times needed shipping lanes to trade and prosper. Regions further inland were highly dependent on coastal regions to provide them with access to these trade routes. Thus these regions on the coast grew wealthy and powerful, while those inland were somewhat ...


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tl;dr: There are multiple reasons for Chiang to treat them different. They differed in their culpability, their readiness to make amends, and their connections. Connections Chang Hsueh-liang had an extremely valuable connection in the person of Soong May-ling, the wife of Chiang Kai-shek. The two had met in Shanghai in 1925, and kept up a life long ...


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The maximum extent of de facto Nationalist control in China was achieved around 1946. This is after the Second Sino-Japanese War ended, and before the Second Chinese Civil War began in earnest. At this point, the Nationalist Government had recovered all of its pre-war territories (at the height of the Nanking Decade), and made several major additions ...


1

If we're talking about the Kuomintang, then what's known as the Nanking Decade was when they held maximum power. In the very early republic Yuan Shikai controlled more territory, but not for long as his inability to stop the exploitation of China by foreign powers and his general conservatism made him very unpopular. Source: China in war and revolution, by ...


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There are plenty of other good answers historically speaking, but I think right now a good example would be the construction of artificial islands in the South China Sea.


1

If you count areas occupied by China that has less than a majority of Han Chinese people, either today or at least when first claimed, then China has numerous colonies along its western borders; Sinkiang, Tibet, parts of Mongolia, etc. The reason why China is not considered "colonialist" in the usual sense of word is because historically, it has NOT had ...


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After reading the interesting explanations, it strikes me that there were at least two reasons why the western European nations, at least those with significant maritime capabilities, sought to colonize: (1) they had no significant military advantages over the other nearby nations. Colonial expansion into the neighboring countries would have been a costly ...


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In the early 15th century, China had huge junks that dwarfed the ships of their European counterparts. China's Treasure Fleet sailed throughout the eastern Pacific and northern Indian oceans. By the latter part of the 15th century, China had turned inward. Building or working on a junk with more than two masts became a capital crime. Who knows what the ...


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Notice how big China is? There's a reason for that; it's only a semantic difference between calling conquered territory a "colony" and simply part of your country. EDIT: Someone pointed out in comments that the term "colonize" means something different from "expanding borders". So I should clarify what I mean: yes the terms are different, but it's just a ...


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They did. Depending on the preferred definition of "colonies", Chinese states in fact established innumerable colonies throughout history. Certainly the most common form was overland colonies created in conquered "barbarian" territories. This processes lasts up till today; Beijing's sinicisation and settlement policies in Tibet and Xinjiang are viewed with ...


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China did have colonies. All of the islands in Asia reachable by junk have been colonized by the Chinese at one time or another: Malaysia, the Phillipines, Taiwan, etc. The far ranging colonies of the European powers made in the 1500-1800 period cannot be compared because China did not have types of sea-faring vessels necessary. Another factor is that China ...



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