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30

The Korean War and the Vietnam War are fundamentally very different conflicts. With the former, South Korea was unambiguously invaded by North Korea in an explicit war of conquest. Due to lucky political circumstances, United Nations was able to sanction a military operation to defend South Korea. The Security Council, Having determined that the ...


23

In Greece in 1946-1949 there was a bloody civil war between the West-supported right-wing monarchist dictatorship and the Communist rebels of Democratic Army of Greece (DSE). The government won the war and harsh repressions followed. The Communist party was outlawed and Greece entered NATO. It should be noted that due to Soviet-Western war-time agreements ...


19

The original source for the stories you heard is apparently the book "Scorpion Down" by Ed Offley. The book's statements are questionable to say the least and this book review makes a good point. I checked what the Russian sources say about K-129. This 2008 interview with Viktor A. Dygalo, the commander of the division that K-129 belonged to, covers this ...


18

According to a 1999 article by Mark A. Bradley in Proceedings, the U.S. Naval Institute's professional journal ("Why They Called the Scorpion "Scrapiron," July 1998), on May 20, 1968, the Scorpion was ordered to intercept a Soviet flotilla near the Azores that included one Echo-II-class nuclear-propelled submarine, a submarine rescue vessel, two ...


17

TL; DR: Landing on the moon was covered in the Soviet press, and was well known in the Soviet Union. It received much less attention than Soviet space missions, though. Just to add something factual to previous answers. NASA on U.S.S.R. reaction NASA's Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1969 (15 MB PDF file) contains some useful information on press coverage ...


15

No! The Cold War was the standoff between the Capitalistic USA and Communistic USSR. Communism lost. What remains is corruption within the former communist country (Russia). The War in Ossetia was over oil (a distinctly capitalistic move) not ideology (spreading Communism) as it would have been were the Cold War still ongoing.


15

Sometimes it deliberately wasn't kept secret from the enemy. This is from William Taubman's Khrushchev: The Man and His Era, about the Cuban missile crisis in 1962: At 10:00 A.M., Washington time, when the quarantine went into full effect, the U.S. strategic Command moved from Defense Condition 3 to DEFCON 2, one level below that of general war. For ...


14

In fact, the U.S. did do a lot of work on AA missile systems, chiefly the Nike program. This included the Nike Ajax, Nike Hercules, and Nike Zeus. The latter was expected to counter ICBM launches. The program was scrapped in 1965 when it was determined that Soviet ICBMs would ultimately overwhelm any defenses, and that the only real defense was the MAD (...


14

There weren't "countless" border crossings between East and West. The checkpoints Alpha, Bravo and Charlie were the designated checkpoints for use by allied forces personnel (there were others which only West Berlin citizens could use). Alpha and Bravo are less famous because Alpha was the main crossing for the "inner German border" dividing East and West ...


14

Finland was kind of a special case. They weren't a Warsaw Pact country, but geography put them in a position where if their Russian neighbor wanted to invade, no power on earth would really be capable of stopping them. Due to this reality, the country adopted a policy of not doing anything whatsoever that might prod the USSR in that direction. They signed a ...


14

Your assumption is wrong, there was the Uprising of 1953 in East Germany And the Fall of the Iron Curtain was also initiated by the East German mass protests.


14

In 1947, Cominform, an association of communist parties was founded. Cominform was supposedly an association of communist parties founded with a goal of mutual economic aid, but through Cominform, Stalin actually wanted to get control over the other communist countries. Josip Broz Tito was opposed to that idea. He wanted Yugoslavia to be independent in its ...


14

The Soviets did not know they were supplying the CIA, because Americans are adept at corporate shenanigans. From the book Skunk Works: A Personal Memoir of my Years at Lockheed: Our supplier, Titanium Metals Corporation, had only limited reserves of the precious alloy, so the CIA conducted a worldwide search and using third parties and dummy ...


13

India never joined the Soviet pole or the Soviet bloc though India and the Soviet Union (USSR) enjoyed a strong strategic, military, economic and diplomatic relationship. After independence both India and Pakistan were backward and needed support from stronger nations. Pakistan joined the Western bloc by signing SEATO and CENTO. India developed closed ties ...


13

Let me add a few details to Semaphore's answer. One is that the Vietnam war actually ended with the North Vietnam invasion of South Vietnam. This happened soon after the US withdrawal, and in violation of the peace treaty. The UN Security Council could not react properly because the Soviets had the right of veto in it. (As it could not react in 2014 on the ...


12

The Panama Canal was closed to Soviet warships for the duration of the Cold War. On December 6, 2008, the destroyer *Admiral Chabanenko" became the first Russian or Soviet military vessel to transit the Canal since 1944. Soviet-flagged civilian vessels seem to have been permitted, at least for a while. A Canberra Times article from 22 April 1948 reports ...


12

Ballistic missile delivery depends very much on knowing exactly where you are launching from. Early SLBM launch platforms had typical positional uncertainties of 100's of metres. As the missile and any MIRV warheads were just unguided projectiles launch positional errors magnified and the resultant destination error could be very wide. Land based missiles ...


12

It is clear that Stalin supported the creation of Israel. From the Wiki: For Soviet foreign policy decision-makers, pragmatism took precedence over ideology. Without changing its official anti-Zionist stance, from late 1944, until 1948 and even later, Joseph Stalin adopted a pro-Zionist foreign policy, apparently believing that the new country would be ...


12

This is a good question. So many encyclopedia entries, passing mentions in books, etc. pass up the issue of ending the blockade, as if the motivation for dropping it was obvious. Daniel Harrington, in a mid-1980s round up and revisit of the arguments over the crisis, gives a typical example of this, "By mid-March, with the worst of the winter behind him, ...


11

Part of the story is probably the Percentages agreement between Churchill and Stalin, from the Moscow Conference in 1944. According to Wikipedia, Churchill's account of the incident is the following: Churchill suggested that the Soviet Union should have 90 percent influence in Romania and 75 percent in Bulgaria; the United Kingdom should have 90 ...


11

See the description of the hashing applied to Finland "countries in the Soviet political economic and strategic block". While nominally independent, Finland was economically subservient to the USSR because of their losing out in the wars between the countries which happened in parallel to WW2 (the Soviet invasion of Finland led to Finland aligning with ...


11

Well, the USSR did not conceal the event from the public. The official position can be described as follows: The landing once more time confirms the materialistic worldview. The landing shows the extent which a human can reach with labor and technological progress, it shows that people can not only visit but also work on the other space bodies. The ...


11

Probably Abraham Lincoln. While the specific "quote" is almost certainly manufactured, the core idea could easily have been taken from Lincoln's Lyceum Address. In that speech, Lincoln warned that the mortal danger to the United States was not foreign but domestic: At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer. If it ever reach ...


10

The Review Article, Antony Kalashnikov (2012) "Differing Interpretations: Causes of the Collapse of the Soviet Union" Constellations: "there is a correlation between mediums of writing and the "factor of collapse" they tend to espouse." "that the historiography is best classified by "factors for collapse", and that these are: economic, nationalities, ...


10

The obvious interpretation is your point that the position of Vienna was similar to that of Berlin: both were in the eastern part of the country, surrounded by the Soviet occupation zone, even if the position within the city itself was different. So if you drew a line across Europe showing the areas controlled by the Soviet Red Army or by local ...


10

There was direct migration from Finland to the USSR during the depression era. Presumably similar proportions of the Polish, Romanian and Baltic state populations did likewise. Similarly, several thousands of Finnish-Americans went to the USSR in the 1920s... but more generally countries that didn't border the USSR saw uprisings (and successful revolutions ...


9

The UN resolution you refer to includes the following clause (8c): [States are to] declare as an offence punishable by law all dissemination of ideas based on racial superiority or hatred. The US constitution includes this clause (in the 1st amendment): Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press... In the ...


9

There were none. Likewise, the U.S. never scored any military victories over the Soviet Union. The Cold War was war by proxy. One superpower was a combatant in Afghanistan, Korea, and Vietnam, but the other did not send troops to the other side— partly out of fear of escalation into global conflict. Rather, they provided support to their allied local ...


9

The Indochine war began after negotiations were suspended between the Viet-Minh and the French Republic in 1946 (the date is often the insurecction on the 19th december, but in fact, the French bombed Haiphong on the 23th november, some even trace it to the leave of General Leclerc, the military administrator, in 1946). The US involvement only began in 1954 ...


8

First, I don't believe the text of Kennedy's original letter has ever been released. The original news story by Tim Sebastian (former Moscow correspondent for the BBC), published in The Sunday Times on 2 February 1992, covers a memo written in 1983 by Victor Chebrikov, the text of which is nowadays freely circulated, and available among other places in the ...



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