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14

India never joined the Soviet pole or the Soviet bloc though India and the Soviet Union (USSR) enjoyed a strong strategic, military, economic and diplomatic relationship. After independence both India and Pakistan were backward and needed support from stronger nations. Pakistan joined the Western bloc by signing SEATO and CENTO. India developed closed ties ...


13

Your assumption is wrong, there was the Uprising of 1953 in East Germany And the Fall of the Iron Curtain was also initiated by the East German mass protests.


10

Ballistic missile delivery depends very much on knowing exactly where you are launching from. Early SLBM launch platforms had typical positional uncertainties of 100's of metres. As the missile and any MIRV warheads were just unguided projectiles launch positional errors magnified and the resultant destination error could be very wide. Land based missiles ...


8

Finland was kind of a special case. They weren't a Warsaw Pact country, but geography put them in a position where if their Russian neighbor wanted to invade, no power on earth would really be capable of stopping them. Due to this reality, the country adopted a policy of not doing anything whatsoever that might prod the USSR in that direction. They signed a ...


6

See the description of the hashing applied to Finland "countries in the Soviet political economic and strategic block". While nominally independent, Finland was economically subservient to the USSR because of their losing out in the wars between the countries which happened in parallel to WW2 (the Soviet invasion of Finland led to Finland aligning with ...


5

As knut's answer points out, it's strange that your list of Eastern Bloc uprisings omits the events of 1953. So, no, East Germans were not as a general rule more passive or acquiescent to the imposition of soviet rule than any of the other populations of Eastern Europe. Churches, small businesses, non-communist political parties, independently minded ...


5

The cold war started even before the end of WW2, in fact the distrust between the USSR and the western powers predates WW2 and can be traced back to the Russian civil war where the western powers favoured the whites rather than the eventually victorious reds. They were allies of necessity, not love, and even in the 1920s and '30s there was an active ...


5

India didn't "officially" join the Soviet bloc in the sense of being a signatory to the Warsaw Pact in Eastern Europe. India DID unofficially "align" with the Soviet Union in Asia. This was to create a counterweight to the Chinese-Pakistani "understanding" that originated in 1962 over the Kashmir (China invaded India on Pakistan's behalf). The need for ...


5

Castro make the cuban medical system the showcase of socialist success. He prepared the educational system to make more medical. See chart at the end source. In fact the export of cuban medical is a one of the big business Castro made. For example in the case of Angola and Venezuela where you can find a big amount of cuban medical the gov of these country ...


5

Yes, SU did its best to make sure that its satellites were controlled as tightly as possible. No, SU did not stunt their growth intentionally, but it might have done it as a side effect of the general economic policy (priority was given to heavy industry which could be mobilized for war production) SU wanted to have as much leverage over the satellites to ...


4

This is unfortunately the only source I could find which describes COMECON's imperialist tendencies in great detail. The article was written in Albania in 1981, so one should take it with a grain of salt as Albania was not in the Soviet camp but the Chinese, and it was not so long ago that China and the USSR experienced a massive deterioration of relations. ...


4

Under the so-called "Percentages Agreement" proposed by Churchill and accepted by Stalin, Greece was the only country in the Balkans with less than 50% Soviet influence (10% to be exact). The other main Balkan countries, Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and Hungary all had 50% or more Soviet influence. Although Greek Communists started a civil war, it might ...


4

It is clear that Stalin supported the creation of Israel. From the Wiki: For Soviet foreign policy decision-makers, pragmatism took precedence over ideology. Without changing its official anti-Zionist stance, from late 1944, until 1948 and even later, Joseph Stalin adopted a pro-Zionist foreign policy, apparently believing that the new country would be ...


4

I have found a source, "Intelligence Estimates of the Warsaw Pact" from "Studies in Intelligence Vol. 51, No 4 (Extracts-December 2007)", which is an academic paper that covers Western intelligence estimates of the reliability of Non-Soviet Warsaw Pact forces. Fortunately, it also contains several quotes from Warsaw Pact Generals. It covers estimates from ...


3

This is a good question. So many encyclopedia entries, passing mentions in books, etc. pass up the issue of ending the blockade, as if the motivation for dropping it was obvious. Daniel Harrington, in a mid-1980s round up and revisit of the arguments over the crisis, gives a typical example of this, "By mid-March, with the worst of the winter behind him, ...


3

The history.com article says: in April 1949, planes were landing in the city every minute. Tensions were high during the airlift, and three groups of U.S. strategic bombers were sent as reinforcements to Britain while the Soviet army presence in eastern Germany increased dramatically. The Soviets made no major effort to disrupt the airlift. As a ...


3

Actually , given the dire situation in Korea when the US entered the war, with only a shrinking beachhead around Pusan left in South Korean hands, I venture that the US did win the Korean War. We are misled by the hopes that MacArthur engendered with his amazing landing at Inchon. Unfortunately MacArthur's complete mismanagement of both supplies and his ...


2

In World War II, the United States had the assistance of the Soviet Union and China, countries with two of the largest armies in the world, that tied down large numbers of Axis troops while the U.S. administered the coup de grace. In Korea, the United States was fighting both China and the Soviet Union, the former, "officially," the latter, tacitly, who ...


2

The opinions amongst historians amateur and professional range from economic and military to accusations of conspiracy. 'Traditional' Capitalist Interpretation Economic Liberals argue that the fall of the USSR is purely economic and is yet another piece of evidence that Communism does not work as an economic model. They cite the failure of the collectives, ...


2

What does win mean? Did you achieve what you originally aimed to do? Then maybe U.S. and allied forces did "Win" as they achieved the mandate of Security Council Resolution 84 to "furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea as may be necessary to repel the attack". References 1. UN Security Council, Resolution 84 (1950) of 7 July 1950, 7 July 1950, ...


2

As an addendum to knut - and I'm lifting a quote from an answer I gave to another question - There is a quote from a Russian General about fighting East Germans that comes to mind for this particular question. Penkovskly, for instance, cited Gen. Kupin, the Commander of the Soviet Tank Army in Dresden and others stationed in East Germany as asserting ...


1

Turkey remained neutral through the Second World War, and so was not part of the Balkans discussion between Churchill and Stalin at the Fourth Moscow Conference (as discussed in my answer here). As I note in that answer: Although minority percentages were actually set in the all cases other than Yugoslavia, it is clear that Stalin regarded these ...


1

Possibly this may be relevant. This map shows the vote share of the party Die Linke ("The Left", former Socialist United Party, the ruling party of the GDR) at the German elections in 2009: As you can see, the former SUP received a high share of votes in East Germany, sometimes exceeding 30%, much more than in West Germany. If you compare this to Poland ...


1

Your question is very broad, as it concerns large territory, and this is difficult to answer how large morale was. Even if eg. soldiers did not want to fight, we don't know how would they if they had to. In my opinion it is then a kind of a "what if" question. As I understand my answer is not what you expect ("documentation") I can share my notices from ...


1

How much influence did the Soviet Union have over the other Warsaw Pact countries? From complete to none, this was contested or accepted in varying periods by the parties and other social groups within the Warsaw Pact countries. Did Moscow directly control them, and direct what they did? No, and yes. Late in WWII there was a request from a ...


1

I believe others have greatly underestimated the extent to which the Arms Race, and the Space Race, bankrupted the USSR by forcing it to spend an ever greater proportion of its scarce GDP on military technology. Then the Afghan War revealed that the emperor had no clothes, while simultaneously Reagan's Star Wars threat pumped up the pressure again. I ...



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