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This is extremely "flowery" language. If it was translated from a German source, that didn't help, either. Germans in the GDR attempted to overthrow the Communist rule on June 17th, 1953. GDR police and Soviet tanks suppressed this uprising. There were deaths and death sentences afterwards. Afterwards, the GDR government prohibited emigration to the FRG. (...


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It's certainly true that the Soviet Union cultivated friendly relations with India from the accession of Khrushchev onward (Stalin seems to have viewed India as basically an agent of the West, despite its independence), including significant amounts of foreign aid. Khrushchev visited India in 1955, following a visit to the Soviet Union by Nehru earlier that ...


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Two of India's enemies, China and Pakistan were allied, beginning with the Chinese invasion of the Kashmir in 1962. Later, beginning in the 1970s, the U.S. "tilted" toward China. A Soviet Union-Indian "rapprochement" was the natural counterweight. "The enemy of my enemy is my friend."


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If I remember correctly, Nehru had several communist sympathies -- or at least, was very tied into and involved with the Soviet Union. Also the U.S. had, in the post-Nixon era, greater ties with China, and hence the Soviets were open to trade with India. Of course, politically, India were quite foundational in the Non Aligned Movement, which spared it from ...


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The phrase "Third World" was first coined in 1952 by Alfred Sauvy, so asking "what were the countries in each 'world' at the end of WWII" is a bit of an anachronism. It's also a bit fraught to ask whether Poland or East Germany should have been viewed as communist countries immediately after WWII, before the Soviet-backed communist parties in each country ...


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Those are very vague terms. The original Three World Model appears to have come from a demographer in the 1950's. In his mind, it was essentially 1 - NATO, 2 - Soviet Block, 3 - Everyone else. The end of the Cold War removed almost the entire "Second World" from existence. So today I believe most people instead use the terms to separate developed nations ...


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Japan thought highly of its hypergrowth as "stable and unstoppable." One major reason was because it was directed from the top, by the "government," specifically the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MITI) that told major corporations what to produce, and how to price it (low, to penetrate foreign export markets). This actually led to the illegal trade ...


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There was a quote attributed to Mao tse-tung "What if they killed 300 million of us? We would still have many people left." It's possible that he never said that in public. But it has become part of the Chinese "lore." Statements of the sort were released during the period leading up to the 1964 announcement of the Chinese atomic bomb, and reflected the ...



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