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15

Kind of, but not as such. The closest to what you're probably thinking of is the nihonjin-machi that began to form in the Pacific around the same time as Europe's Renaissance. These were primarily mercantile communities, but later also housed significant numbers of samurais, Christians and other exiles from Japan. None of them survived after the early modern ...


10

First of all, Hong Kong is now China (from 1997), based off your question, I wasn't sure if you knew. India and Hong Kong were very different stories. India was most definitely hurt by Great Britain. For example, Great Britain had a total monopoly on Indian salt. That meant that the Indians produced salt, and then, the British took it and sold it back to ...


8

Scotland was "ruled" by Edward Long Shanks, then under Robert the Bruce became free. In 1707, Scotland opted to join with England. The group chosen to discus the acts of union were chosen by a pro union Duke of Queensberry, and were mostly pro union. Another case I remember reading was about Eadric Streona. He was a traitor for both the English and the ...


8

The Australian experiment was different because it started as a penal colony -- the convicts and their overseers were the initial seed population of new arrivals. There was no settler class already extant to offer the convicts to as indentured labour. The early years of the colony came close to ending in disaster -- amongst other things failed crops led to ...


6

Here's one example: The dutch colony of New Amsterdam (on Manhattan Island, it's New York now) was captured by four English frigates sailing into its harbour. The British are on the other side of this one, but the point stands. Here's one out of the time scale but the Battle of Nassau deserves a mention as the US marines' first amphibious landing.


6

In Indian political thought there were two basic competing organizing theories, rather simply called The Two Nation Theory and the single Indian nation theory (or Greater India). The basic idea behind the single nation theory is that Muslims and Hindus and many other religous communities as well are all intertwined alongside various languages and religous ...


4

IN THEORY, if you assumed that India had very skilled political leaders, they might have pushed for "one man one vote" within the British Commonwealth, and taken over "Britain" in a "reverse takeover" by the sheer weight of numbers. In practice, it's very hard for two culturally different and widely separated populations to be administered on an equitable ...


4

Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, and Saba are Netherlands Antilles islands which have rejoined the Netherlands following the breakup of the Netherlands Antilles as a country. The other 3 Antilles islands have opted for nationhood, although still as part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.


3

First off, thank you for making me read a law review article on shipwrecks. That was probably one of the few interesting law review articles I've read. Now on to your question. Short Answer: No Long Answer: Still no. The biggest issue is that former colonies trying to assert ownership of a sunken treasure galleon might not have standing in a case, because ...


3

A textbook example of this occurred in Zimbabwe/Rhodesia in 1979. The country had been effectively independent for 14 years. A whites-only government had unilaterally declared independence from Britain in 1965. But in December 1979, as part of the deal by which transition to majority rule was to take place, the Rhodesian parliament voted itself out of ...


3

Some time after the unification of China by Qin, Ren Xiao and Zhao Tuo were sent to colonise the barbarian region of Nanyue around present day Guangzhou. Zhao Tuo succeeded Ren Xiao around the time when revolts began to occur against Qin, eventually signalling Nanyue's independence by declaring himself King and raiding surrounding provinces. When Liu Bang ...


2

Honestly, even if the Indians had trusted the British, the British themselves would have refused this. Many countries had tried to convert their colonies into integral provinces (such as French Algeria), but could not retain them. Moreover, India's leaders had by 1929 publicly asked for complete independence. The British Indian Army itself was unwilling to ...


2

Early Japan had close relations with early Korea. In eras before the dawn of really good and accurate history, those relations may have involved at least one Korean conquest of at least some parts of Japan and/or at least one Japanese conquest or colonization or overlordship over at least one part of Korea. Naturally, nationalistic Korean and Japanese ...


1

From WIKI - Basically, the English took the good ones, and kept them from recapturing the ones riven by slave revolt (Haiti). Some recovery of the French colonial empire was made during the French intervention in the American Revolution, with Saint Lucia being returned to France by the Treaty of Paris in 1783, but not nearly as much as had been hoped for ...


1

I don't think we should give full credit to the British for the 'divide and rule' policy. They could very well have been giving in to the popular demand those days. For e.g. This was Sir Syed Ahmed Khan's speech in 1888 Now, suppose that all English, and the whole English army, were to leave India, taking with them all their cannon and their splendid ...


1

Muhammad Ali Jinnah was the founder of Pakistan. He started of as a strong Indian Nationalist. However he was disturbed by the comparative backwardness of Muslims in Big Business. Jinnah, like the Turkish economist Timur Kuran, identified the cause of as Islam's Inheritance Law. His own community was exempt from it and had done well. If reforming the ...



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