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5

To get all the way to India would take several steps. At the turn of the century there were three cables from Aden to Bombay. So, if you needed to wire Madras from London, the message would first have to be sent to Aden, then to Bombay, then on to Madras. In general, most of the long line pre-WW2 cables were single conductor only (one channel). Here is a ...


3

The component is called a speaker or a loudspeaker and Alexander Graham Bell was indeed the person who invented this component in 1876. A current goes to a coil which acts like a magnet and depending on the magnitude of the current, it attracts or repels a static magnet that is attached to a piece of paper. In this way, the oscillations of the electric ...


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All this is described in many books on the history of laying the first transatlantic cable. For example, in J. S. Gordon, A thread across the ocean, Walker, NY, 2002. The story is too long ans exciting to tell it here but some of your questions can be answered shortly. The early cables handled one message at a time. Moreover, the transmission was very slow....


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Tom Reiss, in his biography of Kurban Said, provided an example of this. Central Asian nomads would leave caches of bread in the desert; how much was eaten would communicate to other passing nomads information about who had travelled through, etc. Edit: It's page 58-59. Some points to consider: It only says that Nussimbaum (said's real name) speculated ...


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There is little doubt that until 19s century most people could communicate and socialize only with those in close proximity to them. Travel was slow, expensive and dangerous. But regular mail service was also not available to everyone in most places, most of the time. When we read in the history of mail that such and such emperor "established mail service", ...



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