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2

Nobody was interested in a court case. Those who thought it was undoable had no reason for a suit, and those who wanted secession needed it as a bold stroke to rally the more undecided Southern factions to their banner. Secession had failed in 1832 and 1850 once people took the time to consider the matter. Secessionists in 1860 needed for it to be a ...


-1

And if the south won the war there magically would have been a 'right' to secede. Can't we just admit this was settled by force and force is the number one determinant in whether a secession effort is valid. If the strength of the entity seeking to split off is such that it can win territory then it deserves that territory.


1

JimZipCode wrote a long and passionate answer which tries to debunk many of the other answers here and claim that the law was settled before the Confederate states seceded. He brings up some interesting points that should be debated. However, he also clearly goes too far. His choice of quotations is selective: I could just as easily come up with dozens of ...


7

Without seeing data on salt imports versus domestic production before the war, I'm suspicious of the assertion that Wales was the primary source. If that was indeed the case, it was presumably because Welsh salt was much cheaper and/or of different quality then the salt produced domestically, for whatever reason. A lot of salt produced in the United States ...


21

Its not quite that simple. Since the process typically relies on evaporating out water from pools, it turns out you either need a somewhat reliably sunny climate to do this, or you have to set up a lot of extra large boilers. So some places are much better than others to set up shop. That being said, the South did in fact have large-scale salterns they ...


-1

I don't know, I can offer some conjecture. First, sea salt extraction is not exactly rocket science: The dilute brine of the sea was largely evaporated by the sun. In Roman areas, this was done using ceramic containers known as briquetage.[5] Workers scraped up the concentrated salt and mud slurry and washed it with clean sea water to settle impurities ...



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