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2

Baby-Name Books Down the ages, these mainly did not exist because, down the ages, most people were unable to read a book, and so couldn't use one. Now, it has been suggested that the Bible was a baby-name book. However, a baby-name book (BNB) can be defined as one which exists for people to name their babies out of. I think both the Old and New Testament ...


0

It's just another trend. Through most of history, short hair was the mark of a slave. Today, it's mostly because of the industrial revolution and the Second World War. In reality, long hair doesn't get in the way if you know how to. That applies to machinery and warfare. Just another dumb trend accepted by dumb people.


5

It would be interesting to make a list of principal ancient texts and how each of them reached us. And make a statistics. (Perhaps someone knows such a list?) Many of the texts that I know exist in both Arabic and Greek medieval versions. Before this list is made, I want to express my doubts about Tyler Durden answer. He only gives examples of literary work ...


5

The "Greco-Roman" culture did not depend on Arabs to preserve it. Relatively few Roman works of science and literature are known only from Arab sources/translations. The literature of Greece and Rome was transmitted, as you said by the Byzantines, but also by many other sources including the Irish, the churches of Asia Minor and the Levant, the Romans ...


19

This modern tradition has its roots in the First World War, when Japan entered on the side of the Allies following the Anglo-Japanese Alliance. Japan's entry carried an initial, overt goal of restoring the German Kiautschou Bay Concession to Chinese sovereignty. The Siege of Tsingtao, the administrative centre of the German concession, ended in the ...


1

According to Ancient American (No. 68), this "Zodiac Plate" is a grid of fifty-six symbols which are embossed on a 51x13 inch oblong sheet of unoxidized copper alloy. Fell Barry considered this a Paphian script which accompanying the corresponding Zodiac sings. References: Fell, Barry, 1985, Perietal Inscriptions of the Anubis Caves, Epigraphic Society ...


2

I don't see anything definitive about this. So yes, it appears to be true that there is no consensus on the plates. One likelihood is of course that they are a hoax (sadly, its been known to happen). If they end up being authentic, given where they were found, my conjecture would be that they are the only known exemplars of a proto-Incan writing system ...


8

It's obvious that having short or long hair is an identity sign for men and women respectively, more or less worldwide. No, it's not obvious, especially not in history. You may be mistaking a Western, Roman Catholic, modern behavior for something universal. The Romans were a little strange in their belief that men should shave and wear their hair ...


-4

There are a few universal signs that have been true across time and societies as symbols of male and female appearance. They are built in and can't really be emulated by the other gender, and they can be perceived at a distance. Women tend to have wide hips, visible breasts and abundantly thick hair. As a tendency, they usually let it grow out at least to a ...


3

Just a thought but before World War One men generally had longer hair and beards. However, short hair on men has often been enforced as a mean of control, in police, military and other forces that require obedience and discipline. Slaves and defeated armies were often required to shave their heads. There may be some sort of connection there. As the men in ...


1

This is much older than the first world war. Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 11:14 "Does not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man has long hair, it is a shame unto him?" This shows that at least in the Hebraic world in the Roman period it was expected that men have short hair.


29

The First World War is often identified as a turning point in men's hair length. Prior to the war, both men and women commonly kept long hair, at least in western societies (and the Far East). This became problematic during the Great War, where armies encountered severe hygiene issues fighting in the trenches. Under the unsanitary conditions of the front, ...


4

So I think these kinds of questions are problematic since they rely on a very specific definition that seems to exclude other traditions. As an easterner I find such claims in Wikipedia that the University is a "European institution par excellence" myopic and rooted in a misguided tradition of them v.s us, rather than seeing world history as one common ...



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