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12

Basically, the Pseudohistory Channel or whoever you heard this from is simply wrong. Rather than a gold standard, the framers of the US Constitution tried to introduce a bimetallic standard - that is, a monetary standard based on both gold and silver. The Constitution states: No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters ...


10

The first set is a Japanese 10-yen banknote issued in 1946, during Allied occupation of Japan. The second set is a one peso banknote issued in 1943 in occupied Philippines by the Japanese government. The third set is a 1 shilling Oceanian Pound banknote issued in 1942, also by the Japanese government, and intended for use in various occupied British and ...


9

It would be inadequate if there weren't so much data collected over the centuries. The Roman Empire is a very well documented period. There are detailed price lists on what the Romans thought was essential, very similar to ours. There is also plenty of information on how much they had to pay for lodging; clothes; books; as well as horses, private houses, and ...


8

The value of a currency at any time is measured by a figure called the Consumer Price Index: this takes into account the price of lots of different things and comes up with a single figure for that currency. This can then be compared between eg the dollar now and the pound now, or the pound now and the pound 5 years ago, or, a defunct currency. One way ...


7

Note that for the time period of interest there was no single German state, as we are talking not only long before the German unification of the mid Nineteenth Century but also well before the simplification of German states that occurred during the Napoleonic period. Consequently: Up to that time [1871] several dozen independent German States and ...


6

There is a book on the subject of the Rhineland subjugation called "From Reich to State: The Rhineland in the Revolutionary Age, 1780-1830" by Michael Rowe. On p. 203 of this book it says that many currencies, including the Franc, continued to be used. The main impact of the takeover was that the Franc became the only currency in which taxes could be paid, ...


5

There are some great pages on roman coinage, e.g. the formidable Roman Coins Database with more than 500 entries for roman early imperial coins. Additionally, Doug Smith's page on ancient coins has some info on roman coins from the early empire.


4

According to Jamila's Coins and Notes Collection blog, this is a modern iraqi coin from 1981. Here's a photo showing the front and back of that coin: I've found it on on Jamila's blog, with an overview of iraqi coins. There, it's described as follows: IRAQ - 10 Fils (Year 1981) (AH 1401) Description: Under President: Saddam Hussein (16 Jul 1979 ...


4

You don't have to know, it just happens. Its basic economics. Supply and demand are intersecting diagonal curves, the intersection of which is the market price. As supply of an item goes up, you shove its diagonal curve higher up the supply axis (to the right in the graph above). That puts the intersection between the two lower on the price axis. In short,...


2

If with Mesopotamia you mean the ancient civilisations in Babylonia and Assyria before the Persian conquest (that is: before 535 BC), then we need to say that there were no coins at all. In a Mesopotamian context, a shekel is a unit of weight, not a struck coin. The first coins in the world were minted in Lydia around 600 BC. In Babylonia, coins began to ...


1

Yes, denominational coinage, by definition, has a set relationship between the units and that relationship will not be exactly the same as the relative value of the metals involved. For example, the Roman denarius was originally denominated to be worth 10 asses. That's why it is called a "denarius" which means thing of ten. This does normally cause a ...


1

This refers to the French pound, the livre. French money was in common use in Germany, Italy and many other places during the 1700s. The livre was worth about $12 - $25. There were 24 silver livres in a Louis, which was the gold coin.



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