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10

The Crown could not refuse assent without launching a coup d'etat against parliament in circumstances that would have produced outrage against the Crown sufficient to result in an election that would surely return a ministry bound to dismiss the existing Governor General, and, potentially, force a republic. Westminster inspired Crowns have generally sought ...


6

What about Simeon II of Bulgaria? After WW2, he was exiled: On 15 September 1946, a referendum was held in the presence of the Soviet army. It resulted in a 97% approval for republic and abolition of the monarchy. On 16 September 1946, the royal family was exiled from Bulgaria. Simeon II has never signed any abdication papers—neither at that ...


5

The definition of "democracy" used today is generally "whatever the US state department labels as a democracy". Hunter gatherer groups usually practiced some sort of democracy, but this isn't considered "democracy" in the academic sense because there is no state. If you are interested in looking into these sort of loose federations which operated on ...


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In the US, referendums are handled on a statewide basis. There's no constitutional basis for having a national one. So if you wanted to effect a national referendum, you'd need to get the same referendum put up in all 50 states for the same election. That may sound a bit daunting, but candidates for president (at least in the primaries), have to go through ...


5

The system you describe is only possible with very small population. Something like this existed in the city-states of ancient Greece, and city-states elsewhere, on their early stages. (But of course not EVERY person had a vote; women and slaves and immigrants and children of immigrants were usually excluded, and still there were officials appointed to run ...


2

It does not meet your popular revolution criterion, but an example is the current President of Nigeria Muhammadu Buhari who was head of state from 1983 to 1985 (a major-general installed by coup, removed by a different coup), and was democratically elected President in 2015, defeating the incumbent Goodluck Jonathan, after coming second in 2003, 2007 and ...


1

A comment mentioned Switzerland as a present day example. After some research, the conclusion it is more accurately a semi-direct democracy as the direct democracy is practiced in parallel with representative democracy. In essence, while they still have a parliament body, any citizen may challenge any law as well as propose modifications to the federal ...



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