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24

From the article you linked: Most of Denmark was liberated from German rule in May 1945 by British forces commanded by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery; the easternmost island of Bornholm was liberated by Soviet forces, who remained there for almost a year`. Given the dates, one thinks that (like in many other parts which were not in the main road to ...


20

"Liberation" is a bit misleading. The German occupation of Denmark ended as part of the May 4 surrender of German troops in Denmark, Netherlands, and northwestern Germany. No actual combat or invasion was involved; troops under Field Marshal Montgomery walked in essentially unopposed.


10

There are many theories on why the Viking expansion occurred and there is no real consensus on which (or which combination) is the correct one. This particular explaination, that Pagan Scandinavia attacked Christian Europe in an ideological response to the Carolingian expansion, is merely yet another theory on this highly contentious topic. Although it seems ...


9

Britain never saw a compelling reason to take them. On the other hand, the Faroes were strategic to Denmark, because of their supply route to Iceland and Greenland. So it was probably the fact that other countries wanted the islands much more. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Faroe_Islands The first settlers in the Faroe Islands were Celts ...


7

Bornholm was occupied by the Soviets during 1945-1946. A second source with links for each part of Denmark Mainland: Fighting was mostly between Danes resistance/german_hilf_polizei (also Danes). Greenland: During the war protected by Britain, Canada, and USA. According to agreement with Danish ambassador Kaufmann. Iceland: From 1918 until 1944 Iceland ...


6

The reason goes back to Queen Margrethe I of Denmark. (She is to the current queen, Margrethe II, what Elizabeth I of England was to Elizabeth II). Margrethe was the Queen Consort of King Haakon of Norway-Sweden with whom she had a son, Olaf. She was also the daughter of King Valdemar of Denmark. The succession plan was to have the son take over both ...


4

Tom Au's answer above is mostly correct with regards to Norway; Albrecht actually had a formally stronger claim to the Norwegian throne, but was set aside since Margrete was so effective. As for Sweden, Albrecht had been king there since 1364, and Margrete only really came to power in Norway and Denmark in her own name in 1387/1388 (she had been regent for ...


3

The foreign policy of most north European countries, including Britain (and Norway), was directed south, that is to warmer climes. Most European countries neglected (or were blindsided by) regions to the north of them. England's interests lay in France, the Low Countries, Germany, the Mediterranean, and even New England and the 13 colonies, all of which are ...


3

I can't find any evidence of Harald being shot in the back (other than figuratively). In fact, the only roughly contemporary account of his death that I can find in some casual searching is from the Chronicon Roskildense probably written in the 12th century. Note that the Chronicon was likely the earliest "history" as opposed to "saga", although being ...


1

Denmark was mostly "liberated" by a surrender of German armed forces in the Netherlands, Northwest Germany, and Denmark to British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery This took place on May 4, 1945 at Luneberg Heath, Germany. This surrender was initiated by the Flensburg government in nearby Flensburg, Germany, under Admiral Karl Doenitz, who had been ...



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