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16

The names People's Republic (more common), Democratic Republic or Democratic People's Republic come from Marxist-Leninist ideology. The idea is that socialist states (they never claimed to have fully realized communism) serve the interest of the vast majority of the people, whereas traditional or bourgeois democracies are not really democratic and only serve ...


15

It started at least with the rule of Gaius Octavius, a.k.a. Augustus. He was a dictator (Imperator) but Rome was continued to be called republic, consuls and Senate continued to be "elected". But the supreme power became lifetime, and the Imperator appointed a heir, usually a real or adopted son. Since then, this is a custom in some dictatorships. The term ...


12

As you have correctly implied, you can NOT equate these terms. Among other reasons, because the first couple are economic systems and the latter are political. There are certain correllations and causations betwene them, however. Just as a note, your question is nearly impossible to answer for 4 reasons: You don't actually define what democracy or ...


12

Beria I think it would be extremely instructive to consider the anti-Beria coup. The conspirators discussed the plans in secret and Beria was arrested by Marshal Georgy Zhukov himself. This plan required an absolute devotion of participants since any leak to a Beria agent was deadly. This is why only high-level people were involved - a Marshal(!!) making an ...


9

What do you mean, 'legal mechanisms'? Putting "how tyrants hold power" and "legal or moral mechanism" in the same sentence is completely missing the point. Stalin didn't have power because being chairman of Politburo, but he was chairman of Politburo because he had power. I'm not completely sure, but I believe that legally the Politburo decisions actually ...


8

The term people's republic was coined by the loyalist side in the Spanish civil war. It was intended to suggest a republic which would guarantee the welfare of all its citizens; their economic rights as well as political. It was adopted by the east European countries, as a supposed third way between bourgeois democracy and the dictatorship of the ...


5

In any election that is described as "unanimous", the winner achieved 100% of the vote. George Washington was unanimously elected twice (by the electoral college), and remains the only US president to have achieved this. In 2002, Saddam Hussein claimed to have achieved all 11 million votes in a single-candidate presidential election. Other examples can be ...


4

Batista had already started losing control of the military months prior to Granma's landing. In early April 1956, recently promoted General Ramón Barquín lead a coup to remove Batista from power. The coup failed, and Batista purged the military of Barquín's supporters, and hundreds of officers were hastily replaced by less experienced ones. This would prove ...


4

There are several safeguards against the Chancellor - or any other part of the government - acquiring too great powers. mart already mentioned Article 1, ang Gangnus mentioned the direct applicability, namely, Article 3. The core meaning of the first articles is: Human dignity is inviolable. The state should do everything in its power to honor and protect ...


4

99.8 percent in Ethiopia. 100 percent, with 99.97 percent turnout in North Korea. The article explains the purpose of the NK elections, which includes accounting for defectors. Then there are cases where unopposed candidates run, even in generally democratic nations. Would you count that?


4

Some considerations you may consider. Stalin was extremely popular with the people, and after the war he was seen as the leader of the victorious side in WWII. There was a huge personality cult. Any move against him would be very much suspicious of treachery even if formally legal. Mafia-style rule. As you know many of the mafia leaders in Russia are of ...


4

1.) Germany, before WWI, was a very successful capitalist autocracy - they only became democratic at (literal) gunpoint. The rulers were hereditary - it was an imperial monarchy. Ditto Austria-Hungary. 2.) Spain spent most of the 20th Century as a capitalist power-house under Franco's dictatorship, something like the 8th largest economy. Portugal lasted ...


3

François "Papa Doc" Duvalier was confirmed as president for a further 6 years in the 1961 Haitian presidential referendum with 100% of the vote. The result was largely seen as fraudulent, as was the result of the 1964 referendum that made him president for life in which he "only" got 99.9% of the vote. In the 1994 Tunisian presidential election Zine El ...


3

I hesitate to call fear of death, beatings or imprisonment a moral mechanism. These are what kept Stalin's grip on power. The basic calculus of an omnipresent secret police force watching for transgressions and the fact that anyone you discussed overthrowing Stalin could turn you in meant that possible dissident elements were completely isolated from each ...


3

In the opinion of Milovan Ðilas, the society level policy apparatus of soviet-style societies--the party elites, the elite state bureaucracy, the elite firm and industry managers--form a "new class" which has a greater interest in maintaining its class rule than it does for the lives of its individual members. Ðilas claims that this new class goes through ...


3

Stalin's first important position was being elected to the Politburo (the main policy-making and executive board) of the Central Committee (the highest body of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, directing all Party and government activities), in May 1917. He remained a member of the Politburo for the rest of his life. During the Russian Civil War (...


3

I can offer some points of the constitution that I remebember beeing implemented esp. as a safeguard: "Human dignity shall be inviolable" (1.1 here) - is the first article, and is meant as a safeguard against legal torture, inhuman punishment and the like No use of the army in the interior Separation of police and secret services "The privacy of ...


3

Jamahiriya translated is a state of the masses. The way that Gaddafi explained it was that the state was governed by the populace through local councils, and he was the designated leader of the people. In reality, it was an authoritarian state with Gaddafi in sole power. In practice, the government was organized into "people's committees", which were local ...


2

The 1997-2006 flag (your third flag) is the first flag (1960-1963) of independent Congo, then known as Congo-Léopoldville. While it's true that it's design is reminiscent of the Belgian Congo flag, I imagine the symbolism of being the first flag of independent Congo was a major factor in choosing it over any other design. The 1963-1971 design (your first ...


2

Gaddafi spent Libyas oil millions on his own image, self importance, family and military whilst his population were suppressed, imprisoned, tortured and left to starve. I don't think the West's view of Gaddafi is distorted at all. Whether it was right for the West to interfere in a country that was not their concern is a different issue and question.


2

I think in Russia we had little knowledge about Libya and Gaddafi before this war. Some people remember that he was a Soviet ally in 1970s and also that he was accused in supporting terrorism. Our impression of him as a dictator stems mostly from his pompous uniform which is stereotypical for dictators (i.e. some guy in a gold-knitted uniform->he is, ...


2

I will try to answer, even though this question probably won't have an objective answer. Can you keep a dictatorship indefinitely? My answer is "practically impossible." The reason is, in my opinion, that there is only one thing that will keep a government afloat, democracy or dictatorship, and that is legitimacy. If you cannot explain your legitimacy, why ...


1

It sounds a lot like you are looking for The Arab Tyrant's Manual. Its observational, but contains a lot of real-world strategy tips for dealing with pesky democratic agitators at all levels. There's also of course the classic The Prince, by Machiavelli. It was arguably a bit more serious, however, it didn't have to deal so much with competition from ...


1

Speaking about "external democracy threat", if you can't defeat your enemy you should make friends with him. Although monarchy is not really the same as dictatorship but Saudi Arabia can serve as a good example for any non-democratic state trying to survive in the modern world.


1

Yes, Saddam Hussein, previously had had got circa 98 % of the votes, then in his last election he improved and got 100%. No surprise both elections were rigged.I remember debating that at university and people saying it was their Iraqi culture, people can be so fool in the West. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/2331951.stm


1

{I'm curious, since you suggest that Hitler was somehow "legal", do you think a dictatorship might happen in the US as well? Do you think those odds are big? Hitler wasn't really "legal"} To address your question: Aside from this question being largely based on wrong assumptions, it also shows a somewhat superficial understanding of the workings of a ...


1

I'm actually not sure about the premise of the question. The main safeguard isn't Constitutional in the first place, but simply the memory of people who experienced the dictatorships. As far as Constitutional guarantees go, the Grundgesetz is actually fairly weak compared with the US Constitution. The main safeguard is a separation of powers, mostly modeled ...


1

The only true defence or safeguard against any sort of authoritarianism is the vigilance of the citizenry: the refusal of the citizenry to either advocate, or submit to, arbitrary measures. Great Britain has no constitution, and the U.S.S.R. had a wonderful constitution - the non-existence of one and the existence of the other had absolutely no effect on ...



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