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The names People's Republic (more common), Democratic Republic or Democratic People's Republic come from Marxist-Leninist ideology. The idea is that socialist states (they never claimed to have fully realized communism) serve the interest of the vast majority of the people, whereas traditional or bourgeois democracies are not really democratic and only serve ...


15

It started at least with the rule of Gaius Octavius, a.k.a. Augustus. He was a dictator (Imperator) but Rome was continued to be called republic, consuls and Senate continued to be "elected". But the supreme power became lifetime, and the Imperator appointed a heir, usually a real or adopted son. Since then, this is a custom in some dictatorships. The term ...


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The term people's republic was coined by the loyalist side in the Spanish civil war. It was intended to suggest a republic which would guarantee the welfare of all its citizens; their economic rights as well as political. It was adopted by the east European countries, as a supposed third way between bourgeois democracy and the dictatorship of the ...


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In any election that is described as "unanimous", the winner achieved 100% of the vote. George Washington was unanimously elected twice (by the electoral college), and remains the only US president to have achieved this. In 2002, Saddam Hussein claimed to have achieved all 11 million votes in a single-candidate presidential election. Other examples can be ...


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99.8 percent in Ethiopia. 100 percent, with 99.97 percent turnout in North Korea. The article explains the purpose of the NK elections, which includes accounting for defectors. Then there are cases where unopposed candidates run, even in generally democratic nations. Would you count that?


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Fran├žois "Papa Doc" Duvalier was confirmed as president for a further 6 years in the 1961 Haitian presidential referendum with 100% of the vote. The result was largely seen as fraudulent, as was the result of the 1964 referendum that made him president for life in which he "only" got 99.9% of the vote. In the 1994 Tunisian presidential election Zine El ...


2

I will try to answer, even though this question probably won't have an objective answer. Can you keep a dictatorship indefinitely? My answer is "practically impossible." The reason is, in my opinion, that there is only one thing that will keep a government afloat, democracy or dictatorship, and that is legitimacy. If you cannot explain your legitimacy, why ...


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It sounds a lot like you are looking for The Arab Tyrant's Manual. Its observational, but contains a lot of real-world strategy tips for dealing with pesky democratic agitators at all levels. There's also of course the classic The Prince, by Machiavelli. It was arguably a bit more serious, however, it didn't have to deal so much with competition from ...


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Speaking about "external democracy threat", if you can't defeat your enemy you should make friends with him. Although monarchy is not really the same as dictatorship but Saudi Arabia can serve as a good example for any non-democratic state trying to survive in the modern world.


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Yes, Saddam Hussein, previously had had got circa 98 % of the votes, then in his last election he improved and got 100%. No surprise both elections were rigged.I remember debating that at university and people saying it was their Iraqi culture, people can be so fool in the West. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/2331951.stm


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I'm actually not sure about the premise of the question. The main safeguard isn't Constitutional in the first place, but simply the memory of people who experienced the dictatorships. As far as Constitutional guarantees go, the Grundgesetz is actually fairly weak compared with the US Constitution. The main safeguard is a separation of powers, mostly modeled ...



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