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7

The Titanic was sunk because the iceberg hit the ship along the side, opening the first 6 compartments to the sea. If the ship had made no attempt to avoid the iceberg, but instead simply hit it head-on, it would have suffered extensive damage to its forward compartments, but would most likely have avoided opening more than a few compartments to the sea. ...


7

Yes, the origin of the phrase "Oh, the humanity" was introduced into popular culture by WLS Chicago announcer Herbert Morrison as he was describing the Hindenburg disaster while watching it unfold. From Wiki: Morrison's description has been dubbed onto the newsreel film of the crash, giving the impression of a modern television-style broadcast. ...


6

There would have been problems with people from the Titanic trying to climb on to the iceberg that resulting in the ship sinking. To begin with, ice is slippery and from the picture you linked to, the iceberg looked like it had steep sides. Getting onto a steep sided slippery iceberg would be very difficult to do. Staying on the cold, wet, slippery sides ...


6

All of the activities of the airship were considered interesting by the newspapers. The New York Times had 5 or 6 articles on the Hindenburg in April alone. The Hindenburg was by far the fastest way for a passenger to cross the Atlantic at the time, taking only about 70 hours (3 days) compared to regular ships which took about a week, twice as long. It's ...


5

Another remark beside the problems of climbing an iceberg: A quote from Wikipedia: Hit an iceberg 11:40 p.m. (ship's time) 14 April 1912 on her maiden voyage and sank 2 h 40 min later After 1 hour the grade of the ship was 5°, an hour later the grade didn't change a lot (from in German Wikipedia). There was no obvious reason of a danger in the begin ...


5

The Titantic tragedy was at least PARTLY avoidable, whether or not the collision was. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic First, there were only enough lifeboats for half of the ship's passengers, meaning that at least half of the passengers "had to" drown. Nowadays, ships carry enough lifeboats for all passengers, following changes in maritime law. ...


3

The Avellino eruption may slightly predate the Minoan catastrophe. It caused diverse climatic disturbances in the following years and brought us several archaeological remnants from the beginning of the Bronze Age in Italy.


2

Wikipedia's History of Firefighting includes the following snippet: The first Roman fire brigade of which we have any substantial history was created by Marcus Licinius Crassus. Marcus Licinius Crassus was born into a wealthy Roman family around the year 115 BC, and acquired an enormous fortune through (in the words of Plutarch) "fire and rapine." One of ...


2

A more general answer can be given. Transatlantic flights of airships were rare events. No comparison with modern airplane fights, and with regular ships crossings at that time. So it is not surprising that they had attention of the media. And they were available mostly to the "rich and famous", and these people always have attention of the media whatever ...


1

In this first paragraph I will discuss what occurred at Hiroshima, in the second paragraph I will discuss what occurred at Nagasaki. At Hiroshima, relief efforts began immediately after the bombing in an unorganized manner, but by the next day they had become organized. A joint public-private meeting was held at 10 AM, the day after the bombing where it was ...


1

Mark Kozak-Holland argues that it was quite avoidable. Although popular history has it that the ship was designed to remain afloat with 4 compartments flooded (hat tip to @GWLlosa), the truth is somewhat more discouraging - cost cutting measures by the company during construction actually transformed those resiliency features into one of the causes for the ...



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