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3

I would recommend e.g. this page for a fair review of the dropping unemployment figures. Before Hitler took over, the Weimar Republic's body of unemployed citizens peaked at 6 million people. The figure was dramatically decreasing down to the figure of only 300,000 people (a decrease by a factor of 20) in 1939. However, that doesn't mean that this decrease ...


8

To answer this question, from the outset there has to be a distinction between the German zones occupied by the Western allies and the Soviet occupied zone, i.e the parts that first became the Tri-Zone then the Federal Republic of German and the German Democratic Republic, respectively. The source I'm using is Greif zur Kamera, Kumpel!: Die Geschichte der ...


1

I'd like to add this as "anecdotal" answer, not as definite but as additional data point: In some cases entire new towns were created, especially for the "ethnically cleansed" as they're now called. Meaning the refugees and those driven from their original homes in Silesia and the Sudetenland, which fell to Poland and Czechia, respectively. One such town ...


0

In my answer to What was the price of a horse in 1750? I provided some actual prices for horses and oxen from early Detroit, dated 1807 and 1825. If you look at the values given you find that a team of horses is worth double a team of oxen. If you look at the inventories you will also find the price of land: 40 acres is worth about the value of a team of ...


5

The people who invented this proverb had somewhat different lifestyle from yours. And lived in different environment. They worked the land. For them a horse was not a liability but an asset. And these people were the majority of population. So even if one of them had no grass to feed a horse, or no desire to work with it, s/he would easily sell it. Even if ...


4

Between the start of the middle ages, until the Industrial revolution (Which majorly changed the revenue a horse could reek), what was on average the burden of owning an horse (Cost vs Income)? The answer to both sides, cost and income, is "it depends". Do you have a lot of land for the horse to graze on? Do you already own other horses and thus ...


3

A horse's teeth is one way to determine its age. So you should look at the teeth if you're buying it. If it's a gift, free, then there's no point in looking. You won't lose anything if it's old, and the giver might get offended and retract his offer.


6

Prices are occasionally mentioned in mid-18th century journals; for example, David Zeisberger's journals, available here: Diary of David Zeisberger : a Moravian missionary among the Indians of Ohio. In this one you will discover that a buck skin is worth a dollar, which is repeated in various frontier sources between 1750 and 1800 that I have read; this is ...


2

This list of medieval prices indicates the price of a draught horse in the 13th century to be between 10s and 20s,, while this estimate of global inflation shows prices in 1750 being 8 or 9 times what they were 500 years earlier. I note that the steady inflation from the early modern era is due to the influx of American silver into the European economy by ...


2

During the Great Depression, arguably the most important problem was unemployment, which at its peak reached nearly 25% of the work force, or 11 million people. The start of World War II, solved that problem. By 1944-45, the U.S. armed forces reached 11-12 million in strength, roughly matching the maximum number of unemployed cited in the previous ...



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