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The number of great scientists in a country strongly correlates with periods of vigorous economic development of the nation. Examples: England since 17th century and later. Netherlands in 17th century. France in 18th and early 19th centuries. Japan and US in 20th century. Germany unified (and thus became a nation) in the second part of 19th century and a ...


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Note: much of this is source from the German Wikipedia, which doesn't have English equivalents for some of the quoted articles. This can be traced even further back to the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, when the German nations (there wasn't a single one yet) considered itself das Land der Dichter und Denker, as literary historian Wolfgang Menzel ...


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It is worth refuting the assumption made by OP that the European money supply in 1763 was solely specie, quoting from the conclusion of The Seven Years War and the Old Regime In France: The Economic and Financial Toll, by James C. Riley. It is true that this war, like other old regime wars, temporarily reversed the flow of specie and changed the ...


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I would recommend e.g. this page for a fair review of the dropping unemployment figures. Before Hitler took over, the Weimar Republic's body of unemployed citizens peaked at 6 million people. The figure was dramatically decreasing down to the figure of only 300,000 people (a decrease by a factor of 20) in 1939. However, that doesn't mean that this decrease ...



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