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-1

Oil. http://www.investopedia.com/university/strength/strength4.asp Bond yields are correlated with long run expectations of energy prices. A momentary spike in real energy price - such as occurred in the early 30s or late 2000s - will correspond with a small spike in yields, while a more lasting increase as in the 70s and early 80s will be more noticeable....


11

One important fear after World War II was renewed deflation, because of the "wind down" of government spending after the war, and a fear of rising unemployment with the return of the soldiers to the U.S. economy. Such fears were a major depressant on interest rates. The thing that the deflationists had overlooked was the 25% national savings rate during the ...


1

Of course there's the whole growth of manufacturing in the North as others have stated. Moreover, the farther south you go, the more labor intensive the act of yielding the commodities (rice, indigo, sugar, tobacco) are. The South and the West Indies kept slaves because indentured servants (who were mostly white immigrants from England) were not immune to ...


2

The answer is mainly that the South is where cotton grows , also this and this. Cotton was a very valuable cash crop, contributing about 2/3 of U.S. export value by 1840. It's also labor intensive. Cotton production really took off after short staple cotton became profitable (due to the invention of the cotton gin). The cotton belt is essentially the ...


4

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source: Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7. Quoting from the source, emphasis mine: With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German ...


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If you're comparing states with significant amounts of representative action (historially very few) vs those ruled by oligarchies or monarchies, the answer is clearly that prosperity is nearly guaranteed during and after the periods of higher representation. In comparison, oligarchies and monarchies almost always lead to long periods of stagnation. At best,...


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No, individuals didn't have and couldn't have electricity for free. It's clear that if there were just a limit on the maximum consumption of electricity (or water or anything else), most people would saturate it and the production wouldn't be sufficient. The prices only followed the template of "total regulation" and "permanent monopoly", so they were ...


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You don't have to know, it just happens. Its basic economics. Supply and demand are intersecting diagonal curves, the intersection of which is the market price. As supply of an item goes up, you shove its diagonal curve higher up the supply axis (to the right in the graph above). That puts the intersection between the two lower on the price axis. In short,...


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Nazi Germany was a command economy run via expropriation. Nothing was "paid for" in the rational sense of a physical currency but instead was basically looted from occupied countries. That included labor. The Nazi economy had a very serious inflation problem going into 1939 and in fact 1938 as well. (Just read up on your Albert Speer...both his testimony ...



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