Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Not slaves, or jews come to think of it. This Discovery Link had some info from archaeology about who built the pyramids. This pretty much sums it up "the pyramids were built by skilled workers and bureaucrats (who lived there all year long) and farmers (who provided seasonal labour during the inundation when they could not work on their farms)". ...


8

First and foremost, you've got to understand what it is that ancient historians mean by "records" of ancient Egypt. We do not, by and large, have accounting ledgers or encyclopedias from that time. They may have existed (well, probably not in the case of the latter) but they are gone to us. What we have instead are the objects that were left behind: ...


7

Egypt remained "special" throughout the period of rule from Rome (through at least 395, in some respects through 640), and there is no indication that the Augustan restrictions were ever lifted. Dio recounts in the Roman History 51.17 that [Octavian] made Egypt tributary and gave it in charge of Cornelius Gallus. For in view of the populousness of both ...


7

There are no known contemporary opinions— perhaps because there was no such event to form an opinion about. Entire books have been written on the loss of the library, but I would first note that most historians reject this story as scurrilous. In fact, the orientalist Bernard Lewis, not ordinarily considered a propagandist for Islam, wrote an essay entitled ...


6

Egypt did not recognise Israel as a country until 1979. Till then, it effectively considered Israel to be enemy-occupied Palestine. (A number of Muslim-majority countries still do.) Consequently, it did not deem Israeli shipping to be legitimate and therefore contended that the blockade did not contravene any agreements. Israeli shipping in the Suez had ...


6

It is a shadow to show the vertical displacement of the Grand Gallery.


6

Funny story, that. It all starts with the Suez Canal. Shipping things between the far east and Europe the long way around Africa was certainly doable, but very very time-consuming and expensive. Once built, the canal was half owned by the French and half owned by Egypt. However, Egypt's finances were your typical third world despotic mess, so in 1875 the ...


5

Actually, England had no part in the building of the Suez canal. That was all France. Here's what happened: Napoleon took his troops on a little excursion through Egypt at the turn of the 19th century. This got a lot of Frenchmen associating the country with romance and adventure. At the time, France had probably the best Civil Engineering schooling ...


5

At about 80 million people, Egypt has about as many people as the rest of the Arab nations combined, and by far the strongest military in the region. Leaving it out of an "Arab League" is just plain unsustainable. According to Syria and the Middle East Peace Process, the sticking point on getting Egypt back was Syria. Particularly Asad. In the wake of the ...


5

Reasons for Arabs starting the war during Ramadan: Arab attacked Israel on October 6, 1973. That year, October was the month of Ramadan. But the main reason for attack on this day was Yom Kippur festival, which was on this day. Yom Kippur also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people. Arabs were defeated in all ...


4

Very good, interesting question: The obelisk form is indeed ancient and ubiquitous - pre-Columbian American civilizations, ancient Egypt, Asian civilizations of long ago antiquity all were enamored with the obelisk and placed it at the center of their ritual and symbolic places of gathering. (See Paul Devereux's works) Some have postulated that this ...


4

Bonaparte's biographer Vincent Cronin's mentions the British naval blockade but no further preventive countermeasures (that I could find upon brief reconsultation). Perhaps this is because this is a one-volume biography of a (in some ways :) big subject. As to Sidney Smith's role (he is also mentioned in the Wikipedia article), his biographer Tom Pocock ...


4

There were undoubtably numerous plots that made it to various stages. Where such a plot progresses to qualifying as an "attempt" is probably mostly up to the speaker. For example if it was the security services speaking, they'd have incentive to make themselves look good by being a bit generous as to what qualifies as an attempt. On the other hand, someone ...


4

In "Ptolemy's map of Ireland: a modern decoding,"* R. Darcy and William Flynn discuss Claudius Ptolemy's Geographia, a map (among many other things) mentioning what is believed to be Ireland, dating back to the early second century. Wiki says 140 AD but I could find no other source to corroborate that claim-- but logic suggests Ptolemy made Geographia in his ...


3

In Libya they completely ousted the regime and they are in an intermediate phase towards implementing democracy. In Egypt they namely ousted the official dictator, but de facto nothing changed: the military are still in power and are oppressing the people much more than before. The protesters must certainly hope to somehow remove the military from power.


3

The Faddan More Psalter, dating from around 800 AD, found in a bog in Ireland, is lined with papyrus, leading to suggestions of links between the early Irish Christian Church and the Middle Eastern Coptic Church.


3

This is a homework-style question and should be tagged as such. That said, comparing the wiki articles for the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and the Russian Revolution, we can come up with a few basic differences. One key difference is the scale and scope of the results. For instance, Wikipedia notes some of the concessions given in 2011: Ouster of President ...


3

While there are many similarities in the causes (high unemployment, poverty, a feeling of opression from the regime etc.), the mechanics are somewhat different. I would say that in the Russian revolution of 1917, the people had a leader, an elite, and an ideology of how the state should be after the revolution. While it is true, in hindsight, that the ...


2

Compare and contrast these two images*: Cleopatra - 3D Generated extrapolation of various sources. 2008 Cleopatra's sister Arsinoe (maybe) - 3D generation extrapolation from DNA. 2013 * Hyperlinks due to probable copyright.


2

Here is some info on travel restrictions in a very specific period. During the 1948–1959 All-Palestine Government Period (a puppet state of Egypt controlling Gaza) 14,000 All-Palestine passports were issued, mostly to Gazan notables and businessmen, with any Palestinians being eligible (including residents of the Jordanian controlled West Bank). It's hard ...


2

Mubarak was ousted but the corrupt military are still in charge, even more openly than before. The Russian Revolution managed to completely change the state.


2

I haven't heard of a connection between Ireland and Egypt, but I have heard of Vikings making it to Greece closer to 1200 BC. I didn't see much about it on Wikipedia, but this article by Ellis Peterson is pretty reflective of what I had heard in a history class several years ago. He describes a Viking invasion at a time when the Greeks were weak. If the ...


2

The major causes of the Bolshevik revolution can be seen in their two most popular slogans "All power to the Soviets" and "Peace, Bread, and Land". The Russian revolution was in some ways a conclusion of previous revolutions in Russia (1898, 1905, the March 1917 revolution) in that the peasants still did not have control over their land and the industrial ...


2

The main difference is that we know more than 300% of information on the Russian revolution and its consequences. (Everything in 3 or more versions). And we know nothing about the Egyptian revolution and its consequences. Hmm.. One little problem. In Russia in 1917 there were two revolutions. Absolutely different, nothing in common. Which one are you ...


2

The exact population is a bit unclear. Estimates for the time period fall in between 2 and 4 million. This area of Egypt was one of the more densely populated areas in the world at that time due to the fertility of the Nile delta. In the Biblical account, Exodus 12:30 says "for there was not a house without someone dead". Family size is also tough to nail ...


2

In 1882, Ahmed Urabi, an Egyptian general, led a rebellion against the Egyptian Khedive, a viceroy to the Ottoman Empire, as at the time Egypt was an Ottoman vassal. The British had strong interests in Egypt, due to among many other things, the Suez Canal, and so, supported the Khedive. At about this time, the Khedive asked the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire ...


2

the state security service is the one who foiled the assassinations attempts. I think they are four attempts (may be there are more attempts) 1) the most famous one was in 27 june 1995 In the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. Mustafa Hamza, a member of the Al Qaeda organization is the main suspect in the assassination attempt on Mubarak in Addis Ababa.But ...


1

The short answer is: no. Egypt formally became a British protectorate only in 1914, but de facto already in 1882. It's all (briefly) told here.


1

The Book of Exodus, as near as scholars can tell, was written during the time of the Babylonian Exile (in the 6th Century BC). That means any actual real events depicted would have had to have been part of an oral tradition among the Jewish people for nearly 1,000 years. Expecting such a work to be historically factual is rather unreasonable. During the ...


1

Libya: Gaddafi was ousted from power and killed. Most of his sons (heirs) are in captivity or dead. Right now, the interim government is still trying to find its place. There are still conflicts going on. Libya is a tribal country, and there are reports of cells of Gaddafi loyalists still fighting on. The situation there is still very fragile and hard to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible