Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Oxford English Dictionary confirms that "corrour" is related to the modern "courier," and in fact corrour was used to refer to running messengers as early as 1382 in Wycliffe's Bible. However, corrour also has a secondary meaning as "a light horseman acting as a scout or skirmisher." OED provides examples of this usage from 1523-1603, after which English ...


2

The Fashoda Incident was the culmination of Britain's North-South expansion through Africa colliding with France's East-West expansion. As Germany was increasing its dominance in Europe, England had to grab a major ally in Europe and their choices were either Germany or France. The Boer wars largely arose from Britain's mismanagement in Africa and since ...


-2

O_o Weird theory... Roman empire fell apart after Attila enter French Gaule while Alaric was destroying Italy Army. From that moment Romain kept failing to win important battle and Wisigoth freed Gaule from Roman troup until 472. It was then the beginning of a new King Clovis and the bond cut of Gaule with Roman Antique Empire. Same issue arrise in ...


7

In german history lessons (as I remember them) the main reasons are listed like this: Great Britain had a policy called "two force standard" for its military fleet, which means GB's fleet should be not only the strongest but as strong as the second and third. Germany increased military ship production in a way that threatened to make this policy ...


1

Britain tended to ally with the second strongest country on the Continent against the FIRST. This was often for balance of power reasons. For many of those "close to 1000 years," France (with the best climate and largest population in western Europe) was the strongest country, and the greatest threat to Britain, and Britain would ally with others (e.g. small ...


20

I agree with much of Semaphore's answer, which shows that actually Britain and France were not in a state of perpetual war. But I think your question really relates to "What changed?" so I'll try to answer that. Firstly, the end of the Napoleonic era. The Battle of Waterloo and following months were the end of the Napoleonic wars, and the end of the "Big" ...


29

British policy on the continent has traditionally been to maintain the balance of power (this is also really a general European thing). This amounted to shifting alliances all over the continent. Though France and Britain are "traditional" enemies (as neighbours were wont to be in Europe), they certainly hadn't been at war for anywhere near "close to 1000 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included