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England had won its big battles against France in the Hundred Years' War (Crecy, Poitiers, Agincourt etc.), typically outnumbered 2 to 1 or even 3 to 1. Likewise, Portugal had a lower population than Spain and was "always" outnumbered by Spain. This was particularly true in this battle because some of the Portuguese had defected to the Spanish side. In ...


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according to bayeaux, pretty tight: The shield wall tactics are not entitled only to roman origins, almost any culture that develops heavy shields will develop a close formation to take advantage of them. Taking in count the influences of roman military in Brittania, and that during the late empire ( ~400) those tactics were still used and adapted to ...


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The question here is how did those chartered companies become defunct. While there were some spectacular failures like the South Sea Bubble - most companies would have evolved, split, consolidated, and so on as markets and legislation shifted (nationalisation, anti-monopoly, etc)... Meaning, there are probably many companies that are descendant of those ...


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Joan of Arc entered during the Siege of Orleans, in which the French already had the advantage by defending a well fortified position. Her assault on Paris failed and the city was only taken by diplomatic means. Besides this, there were two major battles in the final stage of the war: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Formigny https://en.m....



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