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Primarily, in Eastern England and Western Scotland. In particular, what you might be looking for is the Danelaw. Technically, it refers to the parts of England (roughly one-third) where Scandinavian (Danish) laws applied. In geographic terms, this is a huge swathe of Northern and Eastern England conquered by invading Vikings during the 9th century. ...


3

At the time both England and France recognized the authority of the Church. Were there any attempt at having the Pope invited to adjudicate the succession amiably? At first the pope tried to arbitrate the dispute, but it didn't go anywhere. A few years after the war began, the English King Edward III allied himself with Emperor Louis IV, who named Edward ...


1

Well, Bloody Mary is generally confirmed as folklore, so any connections to any historical person is shaky. Mary I of England got that sobriquet because of hers executions of Protestants and Bloody Mary probably got that name because participants may endure the apparition of drinking their blood. However, if you look further, you could see some connections ...


9

The legal situation was not as clear as the question assumes, because neither of the reasons cited were valid at the time. While people often apply Salic Law to the dispute in 1328, this is ahistorical - Salic Law had long been defunct by then. Royal succession was not fixed in legislation, but instead shaped by customs that had evolved over the centuries. ...


8

1. Newfoundland British Colonisation of Canada began with Newfoundland, claimed by England in 1583. This early English interest was in fishing: Newfoundland contained excellent fishing grounds, and fishermen of the West Country steadily became regular visitors to the region over the ensuing decades. In addition to fishing, Newfoundland was seen as "freely" ...


3

Canada is the country that extends from British North America. Far in advance of settlers, many explorers gradually unveiled the vastness of Canada, such as John Cabot (1497) and Jacques Cartier (1535). By 1607, the British started settling at Virginia (the very first British colony), Plymouth, Massachusetts (in 1621) and what was to become known as the ...


4

The British colonization of Canada happened almost by accident. It "started" with British settlements at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621, and elsewhere in what later became the Thirteen Colonies. There were also British "maritime" colonies in the modern Newfoundland and Hudson Bay Valley. The trigger for the colonization of the ...



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