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15

I was referring to Alexei Isaev's book Antisuvorov (Russian). He lists a bunch of falsifications in the preface of his book. First example is Suvorov's quoting of colonel S. Hvalei's book (approximate translation): It happened that the division was immediately behind the frontier posts at the start of the war, meaning right next to the state border. ...


12

Pre-dating the usage of spies by the Persians is (perhaps unsurprisingly) the Ancient Egyptian use of spies and military intelligence, from at least the New Kingdom period (late 2nd milleniunm B.C.) onwards, but quite possibly even from the Old Kingdom. period (early 3rd millenium B.C.), as suggested by the reference to "early Pharaohs" in the following ...


7

Seals were less about verification of identity, and more about verification of non-tampering. As with all significant documents today, the presence (and seals or signatures) of witnesses was the most important aspect of identity- and authentication-verification. Placing the author's/authorizer's seal at the bottom of the written text was more about ...


7

The Western allies were not clueless about the Soviet espionage. However, they could not prevent it and were probably underestimating its extent. The reason they were unable to prevent it is manifold. The nature of science (and the Manhattan project was much more an open-ended research enterprise than a typical modern-style DARPA project) as understood ...


7

An early military writer to discuss the use of spies for military purposes was Sun Tzu in the "Art of War." So it's fair to say that Chinese governments were using spies on an organized basis as early as the 5th to 6th century B.C.


6

Darius I "the Great" (549-486 BC), one of the early kings of the ancient Achaemenid (Persian) Empire was well-known for employing many spies (known as the "king's ears") in his service. This well-documented usage of spies by the early Persian king is at least as early, if not earlier than Sun Tzu's mention of spies in the Chinese histories. I would also ...


6

Legends around Ninja, the category of men trained for espionage and assassination, begin around the late Heian period in the mountains around Kyoto. In the Kōga and Iga provinces, east of Lake Biwa, entire villages were established to develop this specific set of skills. Ninja were organised in three main classes: Jōnin - Commanded operations and made ...


6

The atypical and clandestine nature of the work essentially means that ranks don't make much sense for spies. KGB operatives, especially those operating outside the USSR, would need a diverse set of skills, of which rank would be the least important. Skills like general familiarity with the country they would operate in, good or even expert knowledge of the ...


5

The very breaking of Enigma - by Turing et al using Bombe and also by pinching of the German Naval codebooks - gave the British a blind spot that did nearly cost them the war. That blind spot was that German Naval Intelligence had broken the British Merchant Marine codes in 1938-9 and was reading transmissions using that code into 1944. The British never ...


5

I'm new to this topic so not a lot to offer. However, from what I've read it's the western historians who seem to dispute this theory of Hitler beating Stalin to the punch with the most verve. Some Russian historians do support Suvorov's hypothesis. In any revisionist look at WWII one must consider the political motivations of even allegedly unbiased ...


2

It could be because he pretty much laid low and took it easy during that time. I'd suggest looking over local Irish newspapers and legal documents for the period in question. Much like a geneology researcher would do. A paying account at ancestory.com might help with that. However, you do have to be careful with that site. They allow user content, but ...


2

There was lots of spying and surveillance being done by the military, producing copious amounts of often quite mundane data that was then analyzed for its military usefulness. All it took was to make it someone's job to look through that same data for evidence of war crimes.


2

Probably Cardinal Talleyrand, who had been Napoleon's foreign minister and was still on his Council of State while working with the Coalition to unseat Napoleon after 1807.


1

If early Roman history is to be believed (it isn't really true, as we know, but it's such a darn good read...), then Sextus Tarquinius would be pretty high on the list: Gabii reneged from the Latin treaty with Rome for unknown reasons. Tarquinius' son, Sextus Tarquinius, went to Gabii, pretending to be in revolt against his father and asking for ...


1

CROWCASS was initiated after the war was essentially won and the Allies had the resources of Germany and everyone in it at their disposal. They had hundreds of thousands of people in prisons and camps and gigantic interrogation teams. German officers and leaders were interned in special prisons and subjected to round the clock interrogation. Many German ...


1

Soviet intelligences officers carried "Army"-like ranks. To be sent abroad, they had to have been promoted at least twice, to Captain. They were long-standing officers who would spend the rest of their careers in intelligence. Like similar U.S. officers, they tended to "top out" at Major, but would often receive a final promotion to Lt. Col. at the end of ...


1

I have not read these books of Suvarov but I have heard several historians like Glatz scoff at his works. While I would not put anything past Stalin from a moral point of view, he was no fool and it would have been foolish for him to attack in 1941. Why? The army was in chaos by the purges in 1938 and from its terrible showing versus Finland. Reforms were ...



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